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I have problem that I sleep for a while, two or three hours and then a nightmare seizes me in its grip. I know very well that I am lying down and that I am asleep, but still it is scary. I am also aware that somebody is coming up to me, kneeling on my chest, taking me by the throat and squeezing. I wonder if anyone have this problem or I am the only one who is crazy with this thoughts. Could it be narcolepsy, because I have read something similar happens with this disorder?

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I have so similar problem, with trouble sleeping and terrible nightmares. I am struggle, but I am tied down by that dreadful feeling of helplessness, which paralyzes us in our dreams. I want to cry out but I cannot even cry when this is happening to me. I want to move, but cannot do it as well, so I try gasping for breath, to turn on my side, to throw off a creature who is crushing me and choking me but I cannot. Then I usually wake up, panic-stricken, covered in sweat. I have friend who told me doctor might help me so I visited his not so long time ago. He diagnosed me with narcolepsy, so I believe it could be your problem as well. He told me there is some HO methods may also help those with narcolepsy, as well to help patients with some other types of sleep problems. I believe in this case, an earlier bedtime remains the best option. The cells that produce the small peptides, HO, reside in the hypothalamus, which is an area deep in the brain. Recent rodent studies indicate that these cells connect to brain regions that are involved in sleep and wakefulness. These evidences suggest that HO helps the sleep and wakefulness areas carry out their jobs, so HO-related abnormalities may impair their function, such as narcolepsy is.
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This sounds a bit like sleep paralysis (sp), which i suffer from. it is the sense of being aware that one is unable to move or speak while falling asleep or waking up. Sleep paralysis is sometimes associated with narcolepsy. This is a neurological condition in which a sufferer sleeps uncontrollably. There are also many people who experience Sleep Paralysis without having signs of narcolepsy. Usually, the sufferer of an episode of Sleep Paralysis will report that they felt an inability to move any part of their body whilst falling asleep, or immediately upon waking up - the whole body feels paralysed. The sufferer is fully aware that they are awake, but have great difficulty moving. The experience can produce great anxiety and fear, as the sufferer will struggle to "wake up".
As well as the inability to move, many people have reported hallucinations during nighttime paralysis. These often seem to take the form of someone else being in the bedroom. Sleep paralysis can affect different people in many different ways. Knowing what to expect and how it can affect you can make symptoms much easier to cope with. Individual experiences vary, but some symptoms can include: overwhelming feelings of evil entities watching you, an intruder in your room, alien abductions, rape, an "old bag lady" or "old hag" attacking or suffocating you in your sleep, and many other frightening experiences that always take place while in a paralyzed state.
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