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Hello!

So, I've been suffering from a problem that has been happening since I was fifteen years old. My body for whatever reason gets extremely itchy whenever it heats up from hot showers or just a natural hot day outside.  The itching gets to the point where it feels like I'm being stung by a bee and it drives me crazy sometimes when I have to walk around outside during a normal day.  Th itching is so severe to the point where it happens like crazy all over my body. The only way to fix the problem is that I have to go to a colder area.

I'm pretty sure it has to relate to sweating somehow because of what happens when your body heats up. Does anybody have any good ideas what exactly I'm going through..? I'm having a very hard time finding any info about this :/

Thank you so much!

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Hi...this has happened to me twice in my life ( I'm about 40 ) where the itching would start after heat of some sort such as working out or a shower..the first time was after getting some injections for when I went on holiday...the second time was after I had a tetanus booster after being bit by a dog...so I just put it down to some sort of reaction to the injections...I found taking claritin tablets helped a lot or any other sort of allergy relief...
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You might be suffering a condition called Urticaria (Hives). I've been having this for about 1 year now. I recommend you take Zyrtec, it is an over-the-counter medication used to relieve symptoms of seasonal allergies. Zyrtec is the brand name for the drug cetirizine. It is available for adults and children over 2 years old. Zyrtec helps control those intense prickly hot itchy flashes through my body that sometimes make my scalp itch like crazy. I suggest you stop taking hot showers and take cool ones instead. Try to stay away from Spicy food. Also exercise might aggravate urticaria. Yea i know it sucks, once i finish exercising i try to cool off as soon as possible. Here is a link so that you could know more about this Skin Reaction: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001848/


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