Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

What is Chlamydia?

Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydia is quite dangerous because it may cause irreversible damage if not treated.

How is Chlamydia acquired?

Chlamydia can be acquired through vaginal, anal, and oral sex and can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby during vaginal childbirth.

What are the symptoms of Chlamydia?


The biggest problem with Chlamydia is that it is usually asymptomatic (has no symptoms) and this is exactly what makes it so dangerous. Even if you do not have the symptoms you can still pass the infection to your partner.
If symptoms do occur, they usually appear within 1 to 3 weeks after exposure.
In women, the infection first attacks the cervix and urethra. The symptoms that may appear are abnormal vaginal discharge or a burning sensation when urinating. If the infection spreads to the uterus and fallopian tubes, it can still be asymptomatic or cause problems like lower abdominal pain, low back pain, nausea, fever, pain during sex, and bleeding between menstrual periods.
Men who do experience signs or symptoms may have a discharge from their penises, burning and itching around the opening of the penis or a burning sensation during urination. Those who engage in anal sex may acquire Chlamydia infection in the rectum, which can cause rectal pain, discharge, or bleeding. Infection of the cervix can also spread to the rectum. Chlamydia can also be found in the throats of women and men having oral sex with an infected partner.

Passing Chlamydia from mother to a baby


Babies born to infected mothers during vaginal delivery can get Chlamydia infections in their eyes and respiratory tracts. Chlamydia can cause infant pneumonia and conjunctivitis (pink eye) in newborns. There is some evidence that Chlamydia could lead to premature births.

Who’s at the biggest risk of contracting Chlamydia?

Anybody sexually active can get infected with Chlamydia. The greater the number of sex partners, the greater the risk of infection. Young girls and women are especially at risk because their cervix is not fully matured.

Chlamydia tests and treatments

Laboratory tests are used to diagnose Chlamydia. They may involve getting a sample from an infected site (cervix or penis) but a urine test can also tell if you have the bacteria. A Pap test is not suitable for testing for Chlamydia.
It is crucial that all sex partners get evaluated, tested, and treated.
Luckily, Chlamydia is easily treated and cured with antibiotics. A single dose of azithromycin or a week of doxycycline (twice daily) are the most commonly used treatments. While on treatment, the infected should refrain from engaging in sexual intercourses until their and their sex partners’ infections are completed cleared. Otherwise, re-infection is possible. Retesting is advised for women three to four months after treatment.


What happens if you don’t get Chlamydia treated?


If untreated, Chlamydia infections can progress to serious reproductive and other health problems. In women, Chlamydia can spread to the uterus or fallopian tubes and cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This disease may further lead to permanent damage of the fallopian tubes, uterus, and surrounding tissues and cause chronic pelvic pain, infertility, and potentially fatal ectopic pregnancy.
Although rare, complications in men involve bacteria spreading to the epididymis (a tube that carries sperm from the testis), causing pain, fever, and, rarely, sterility.

How to reduce the risk of contracting Chlamydia?

The risk of transmission of Chlamydia can be reduced by abstaining from sexual contact or by the use of latex condoms. Other methods of birth control, like birth control pills, shots, implants, or diaphragms, will not protect you from Chlamydia or other STDs.

Here are some Chlamydia related topics:

Is chlamydia most common to women or men
Could I have gotten Chlamydia again?
Bleeding with Chlamydia
Does Chlamydia make it harder to conceive?
Protected sex whilst on treatment of Chlamydia
Chlamydia still hasnt gone!

or use our Search Button for more topics

Loading...

I need to say that "getting a sample from... penis" through uretral finding is dangerous.

I had a terrible inflammation after a fine stick was inserted the uretra and later, a radio found out that the uretra was "laminated".

Better resort to a serology.

Cordially, Sigi
Reply

Loading...

my boyfriend is currently being tested for chlamydia and we are both concerned that i will have it as well. it is difficult for me to visit a doctor though because of financial trouble. i have a bottle of doxycyline left over from a previous use (not chlamydia) and was wondering how much i should take if his test is positive, just to make sure that i won't have it. They are 100mg tablets. i know this can't stand in the place of a doctors visit, but it's going to be difficult to go see anyone soon. and i would like this taken care of before it gets bad
Reply

Loading...

if your boyfriend has it you really should see a dr. and you should not take medication without a doctors order.
if you do choose to take doxycycline that you have left over make sure to check for an expiration date and make sure it has been stored in a light resistant container. the normal dosage for an average adult would be one 100mg tab twice the first day and one 100mg tab once per day for the next 6 days. but again you really should see a dr before taking any medication
Reply

Loading...

Hi,

Is it possible for symptoms of Chlamydia to appear 3 days after sex with someone infected?
Reply

Loading...

I read up on this and yes it is possible to show signs that early. Some people go almost a year with out any symptoms at all and then BAM, they have every symptom imaginable all at once.
Reply

Loading...

I have been have weird discharge that smells. I had blood spotting 2 days after my period end. Sometime an itching feeling. I have never had unprotected sex, i only sleep with 1 person and we use a condom all the time. But one time the condom came off and got lost in me. We stopped put on another condom. I scared that i may have and STD or something. I was wondering if i should go to the doctor or is this something i can fix at home?
Reply

Loading...

Can this cause zits or pimples in those areas at all?
Reply

Loading...

So i was recently diagnosed with chlamydia and they gave me doxycycline and that made my symptoms a little better for a day or so the a few day they my symptoms got a lot worse, my symptoms are burning while urination and pain in the abdomen. So i went to urgent care and they said that i have pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). So they have me a shot of something i cant remember the name of and a one time 8 dose of azithromycin That same night i got really nauseated and diarrhea. I woke up at 2 in the morning in a lot of pain. I went to the bathroom and found blood. The pain im feeling is like my normal cramps but the blood is a little clotty and when i pee the burning is back again and pain in my stomach. Can i be on my period and that made the meds not work or should i go to the doctors??????
Reply

Loading...

Jenny wrote:

What is Chlamydia?

Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydia is quite dangerous because it may cause irreversible damage if not treated.

How is Chlamydia acquired?

Chlamydia can be acquired through vaginal, anal, and oral sex and can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby during vaginal childbirth.

What are the symptoms of Chlamydia?


The biggest problem with Chlamydia is that it is usually asymptomatic (has no symptoms) and this is exactly what makes it so dangerous. Even if you do not have the symptoms you can still pass the infection to your partner.
If symptoms do occur, they usually appear within 1 to 3 weeks after exposure.
In women, the infection first attacks the cervix and urethra. The symptoms that may appear are abnormal vaginal discharge or a burning sensation when urinating. If the infection spreads to the uterus and fallopian tubes, it can still be asymptomatic or cause problems like lower abdominal pain, low back pain, nausea, fever, pain during sex, and bleeding between menstrual periods.
Men who do experience signs or symptoms may have a discharge from their penises, burning and itching around the opening of the penis or a burning sensation during urination. Those who engage in anal sex may acquire Chlamydia infection in the rectum, which can cause rectal pain, discharge, or bleeding. Infection of the cervix can also spread to the rectum. Chlamydia can also be found in the throats of women and men having oral sex with an infected partner.

Passing Chlamydia from mother to a baby


Babies born to infected mothers during vaginal delivery can get Chlamydia infections in their eyes and respiratory tracts. Chlamydia can cause infant pneumonia and conjunctivitis (pink eye) in newborns. There is some evidence that Chlamydia could lead to premature births.

Who’s at the biggest risk of contracting Chlamydia?

Anybody sexually active can get infected with Chlamydia. The greater the number of sex partners, the greater the risk of infection. Young girls and women are especially at risk because their cervix is not fully matured.

Chlamydia tests and treatments

Laboratory tests are used to diagnose Chlamydia. They may involve getting a sample from an infected site (cervix or penis) but a urine test can also tell if you have the bacteria. A Pap test is not suitable for testing for Chlamydia.
It is crucial that all sex partners get evaluated, tested, and treated.
Luckily, Chlamydia is easily treated and cured with antibiotics. A single dose of azithromycin or a week of doxycycline (twice daily) are the most commonly used treatments. While on treatment, the infected should refrain from engaging in sexual intercourses until their and their sex partners’ infections are completed cleared. Otherwise, re-infection is possible. Retesting is advised for women three to four months after treatment.


What happens if you don’t get Chlamydia treated?


If untreated, Chlamydia infections can progress to serious reproductive and other health problems. In women, Chlamydia can spread to the uterus or fallopian tubes and cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This disease may further lead to permanent damage of the fallopian tubes, uterus, and surrounding tissues and cause chronic pelvic pain, infertility, and potentially fatal ectopic pregnancy.
Although rare, complications in men involve bacteria spreading to the epididymis (a tube that carries sperm from the testis), causing pain, fever, and, rarely, sterility.

How to reduce the risk of contracting Chlamydia?

The risk of transmission of Chlamydia can be reduced by abstaining from sexual contact or by the use of latex condoms. Other methods of birth control, like birth control pills, shots, implants, or diaphragms, will not protect you from Chlamydia or other STDs.

Here are some Chlamydia related topics:

Quote:

Is chlamydia most common to women or men
Could I have gotten Chlamydia again?
Bleeding with Chlamydia
Does Chlamydia make it harder to conceive?
Protected sex whilst on treatment of Chlamydia
Chlamydia still hasnt gone!

or use our Search Button for more topics


what are the risk of chlamydia being passed on through unprotected oral sex?
Reply

Loading...

hi my name is krystal and i a question can i still get pregant if i been havinq clamida for more then a year i recently found out my fiance has it when we were broken up :-(
Reply

Loading...

Can you catch an STD if you wear a condom? And how often is the discharge everyone is mentioning? Constant or sporadic?
Reply

Loading...

well the doc gave me meds i had to take two pills a day for 7 days...
and saturdaywas my last day to take the pill..
but i stil have discharge..
does that mean that i still have it and the pills didnt work?
i no i stil have to go bk in a week r two for a check up but im jus wondering because people say that
the symptoms usaly go away in a week.. is that a week after the meds or  the week during the meds?
im so scared n confused =(...
idk wat to doo 
Reply

Loading...

How long can Chlamydia live outside the body and on sex toys made of firm rubber? Becuase I am worried I might have re-infected myself despite cleaning it with soap and warm water and not using the product for 10 days.
Reply

Loading...

I think i have it, it is hard to distinguish it from gon/thrush and etc :(
Reply

Loading...