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I have a friend who said that postural tachycardia syndrome has been proposed as a mechanism for symptoms of the chronic fatigue syndrome. He said it usually happens in a series of adult patients. Two of those may share a common pathophysiology particularly in the young that was what my friend said. Now I am interested and want to know if it is true in those patients, it is reported loss of heart rate. I would like to hear what you could tell me about postural tachycardia syndrome.

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Upright posture is a fundamental human activity requiring rapid and effective circulatory and neurologic compensations. It could happen in order to maintain blood pressure and consciousness. The orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is a disabling disease state is the most common reason for referral for chronic orthostatic intolerance. Patients are often unable to hold jobs or attend schools because of their postural tachycardia syndrome. An operational definition of the syndrome for postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome includes symptoms of orthostatic intolerance. This is associated with an increase in heart rate from the supine to upright position of more than 30 beats per minute. In some cases, heart rate could be greater than 120 beats per minute within 10 minutes of head-up tilt. An exaggerated increase in heart rate at postural tachycardia syndrome is often accompanied by hypotension in association with dizziness, nausea, palpitations, heat and fatigue. This is reported just in the upright position, and has been described under some other names. The most common names are the hyperadrenergic syndrome of Streeten, and idiopathic hypovolemia of Fouad et al, etc. POTS is common, affecting an undisclosed number of patients mostly in the age range of 12 to 50 years, and mostly female.
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