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Hi, folks. Several years ago I was stung by wasp and I had some severe allergic reaction. Since I am allergic to wasp stings, I would like to know if I am allergic to bee stings also. I would appreciate if someone could answer my question. It will really help me.

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Hello. I think you should be careful from bee stings as well. Both these species inject venom. It is a substance that contains a lot of proteins. People who are allergic to insect stings are in fact allergic to venom. Venom is a powerful allergen. Allergy manifestation can be mild, but it can be also severe. Anaphylactic shock can be lethal. That is why I recommend you to take precaution measures just in case. I hope everything will be all right. Bye!
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Yes, you will be allergic. Wasps sting with about 0.5 to 15 micrograms of venom where as a Bee's sting is 50 micrograms, yes, that's right, 50 micrograms.
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Guest wrote:

jerrold745 wrote:

Hi, folks. Several years ago I was stung by wasp and I had some severe allergic reaction. Since I am allergic to wasp stings, I would like to know if I am allergic to bee stings also. I would appreciate if someone could answer my question. It will really help me.




Yes, you will be allergic. Wasps sting with about 0.5 to 15 micrograms of venom where as a Bee's sting is 50 micrograms, yes, that's right, 50 micrograms.


I am allergic to wasp stings, but not bee stings or yellow jacket stings. Sorry, but it's true. I swell up like a balloon only to wasps.
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I used to get stung by bees and I wasn't allergic until one day I got stung I had an allergic reaction. Today I got stung by a wasp or a yellow jacket but I had no allergic reaction at all. So I guess I'm allergic to bees but not wasps?
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FYI...my son went through full (and painful) allergy testing when he was about 6. He was found to be allergice to wasp and yellow jacket stings, but not bee stings. Obviously, better safe than sorry, but this does tell you that you can be allergic to any combination- but bot necessarily all of them. Because he was such a young age and not likely to be able to tell the difference between the 3 when he gets stung (didn't see it or maybe too scared and in pain) I taught him to tell someone anytime he was stung. We were told by his allergist to administer Benadryl first and if swelling crosses over to next joint (if stung on hand- ok to wrist, but not ok past elbow) then use Epi-Pen .
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Hi all. As far as i understand a wasp and a bee both have venim in their stings the venim contains a protein and in the protein is an enzyme which the body see as a threat this is believed to be the cause of the allergic reaction. Hope that helps

Steve 

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I have a severe alafletic reaction to wasp, hornets, and yellow jackets and need to carry an epipen everywhere I go. However I have no life threatening allergys to honey bee's or bumble bee's although I do react a little worse then honey bee's. Also though in my case I have 3 to 5 minutes to get my epipen after being stung before I'm risking death which I know is a very severe allergy I'm not sure how a less or equally sever allergy would be in somebody elses body I'm assuming very similair though, but I'm always catious even with honey bees and I would say to be catious around any of them.
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Bee and wasps do NOT have the same venom and it is very possible to be allergic to only one as me myself is . Wasps are my allergy bee stings do not bother me
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I had an anaphylactic reaction to a bee sting 4 years ago and last week was stung by a wasp. I assumed I would have the same reaction, so my boyfriend and I started to drive to hospital. We waited for 10, 20, 40 minutes and no reaction. I kept feeling little jabs of pain, on and off
for about 3 hours. My arm had a white bump, but no swelling or redness. I put rubbing alcohol on it and after 3-4 hours, I had no pain or any reaction, so fingers crossed, I will never react to a wasp sting should it happen again.
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It is true, although from the same family, bees and wasps have a slightly different protein. Proteins are from DNA and to have exactly the same, they'd be the same. This isn't to say the part that is the same in the venom isn't the culprit, so you should be tested to know for sure. I am allergic to both, and know because my stings have been witnessed. Luckily, the one time I didn't know, I had taken Benadryl for seasonal allergies 10- 15 minutes prior to being stung. (I was pregnant and taken of Rx allergy meds). The problem is one usually does not know what stung them unless someone else witnessed it. The woman who had her son tested is on the right path getting him tested. I am a nurse who has worked urgent care and emergency care, the drs will tell you to carry an epipen and use it if you're not sure and you feel odd within 2-3 minutes. The allergist I worked for for a couple months while his nurse was on maternity leave said if you try Benadryl before the pen, make sure it's liquid or injectable because pills may take too long to break down and work in these cases. Same if allergic to any insects, foods, or meds for that matter. Also, Benadryl cream is absorbed right into the blood stream through the skin. It does not administer a high enough does to prevent a reaction, but it can slow it down. Apply to the affected area. I hope this helps. The bottom line is to be careful and enjoy life!
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Yellow Jackets and Hornets, European and Bald/White Faced, are all wasps with very similar venom. If you're allergic to one, you'll very likely react the same way to the other's venom. Bees have a different venom. Just because you react to a wasp or bee sting does not mean you will react to the other. Here's the scary thing about allergies though, one never knows if there is an allergy until the reaction occurs the first time. A reaction will never occur the very first time you're stung because there are no existing antibodies to stimulate the reaction. On the first exposure or maybe the 50th exposure, your body will recognize an agent as foreign and offensive, why I can't answer. Your body will form antibodies against the perceived offending agent but no outward symptoms will be noticed. The next time you're exposed to the same offending agent, those previously formed antibodies will recognize the agent as an unwanted guest and symptoms of a reaction will happen. As an old ER nurse, we were taught that every time you experience an allergic reaction it tends to be more severe than the last.
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I swell up real bad and get woosy from yellow jackets. But, I've been stung twice by 2 types of paper wasps. No reaction at all. Like a skeeter bite.
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I'm the same way.
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The first response about dosage of venom, is completely irrelevant. A snake can deliver 1.5ml, Which would be 1,500mg....also has nothing to do with bee venom... Venom means something toxic injected by an animal/insect. Nothing to do with what's in it. So a lot of something you're not allergic to, versus a little of what you are allergic to. There isn't any correlation.

On to your actual answer.
Bees, typically honey bees (allergies to bumblebees are rare) contain hospholipase A2 and mellitin. Waps, which as far as family goes, means hornets, yellow jackets, paper wasps, contain antigen 5. It's very rare that you'd be allergic to both allergens. The one caveat, that is also rare, is that both venoms contain hyaluronidases. If you're allergic to that, then you'd be allergic to both, but allergic reactions to that are usually pretty mild.

After the science, the bottom line answer is, no, just because you're allergic to bees, does not mean you're allergic to wasps. You might be, but it's not because of your bee allergy.

-Wendel- AZ
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