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Hi, I'm 48 years old and I have been diagnosed with thyroid gland cancer about 6 months ago. I have tried radiotherapy and chemotherapy to try to reduce the tumor but it didn’t work. The tumor has begun growing during the last month, so the doctor scheduled a surgery to remove it. I have a surgery scheduled for the next week. I'm already taking some hormone blocker to prepare me for the surgery. I'm very anxious about this whole issue and I'm very interested in side effects and complications that can happen after the surgery. I’d be grateful for any useful information. Thanks.

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There are two ways in performing the thyroidectomy, the first one is called invasive thyreidectomy and the other is endoscopic thyroidectomy. The difference between those two is the size of the incision made during the surgery, in invasive method a big incision is made, and that method is usually used for removing the whole gland, endoscopic method is used when only a small part of the gland needs to be removed and the difference is that a few small incisions are made big enough to put the endoscope and other instruments into the working area. The complications of thyreidectomy are typical for any surgery, but there is less possibility of them occurring if non invasive method is used. If total thyreidectomy is performed there is a risk of removing so called parathyroid glands which are located on the rear side of the thyroid gland. Since they are small a surgeon may hurt them or remove them by accident and that can cause major functional disorders allover the body. Parathyroid glands produce a very important hormone called PTH (parathyroid hormone) whose main role in the organism is control of calcium methabolism. If the PTH is missing the level of Ca++ in the blood decreases causing uncontrolled muscular spasm and can lead to death. That is the most common complication of thyroidectomy, but if the trained and experienced surgeon is performing it there should be no problems.
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i had mine removed in novemebr of last year and it was no big deal until now.I was never told of theafter effects so I will tell you.You will be very anxious after surgery,expect not to be able to swallow normal for a while,and after the surgery i had no pain,now i am having pain and some serious voice issues that they are trying to figure out.have the surgery and good luck
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was wondering how the surgery went and what went on with that , i am sceduled for operation in the morining.kg
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Hello! My mother had thyroidectomy done a month ago. It was to remove cancer she was found. Besides removing the thyroid, they removed some lymph nodes from both sides of the neck as well.

After the surgery she was in a lot of pain and was taking painkillers, she had problems with her voice but they said that was a normal post op thing. Then she started having some strange muscle spasms in the feet and hands and had problems breathing and got us all worried. She was monitored for calcium, magnesium and phosphorus and was found to have low levels of calcium and had to take some supplements.

Again, they told us this was normal and transient and that only rarely a person ends up with permanent low calcium levels.

What I don’t like about the whole thing is her low mood but I guess that is due to hypothyroid. She is still saying how down she is and I have never heard her saying things like that. She is about to see a doc to check the thyroid levels and see if she needs dose adjustment.
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I had a total Thyroidectomy done about two years ago and it's been an interesting life ever since. My mood swings are fantastic as is the weight I gained and can't for some reason shed. She needs to keep up on her lab work every 6 weeks like clock work. If her Doc. orders just the TSH levels to be checked, ask that the Free T3's and T4's get checked as well. Always ask for copies of the lab work too. That way, if something doesn't seem right, she can turn to that and question the Doc.

Depression, mood swings and weight gain are unfortunately part of living life without a Thyroid. It's difficult at times to function while other times, she can be full of energy. If her body's telling her that something's not right, don't let her question it and take her to a Doc. Her levels could be off. Even if her levels are off just a little bit, it could make a big impact on her overall physical, mental and emotional well being.
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My wife had her thyroid completely removed a little over a year ago when it was discovered that she had cancer. I was just trying to determine how difficult it is to get pregnant and if she does get pregnant what possible compliccations are due to the lack of a thyroid.
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my mother had surgery on the rest of her thyroid because of a possible goiter about a week ago, it was invasive surgery, shes still having trouble, she can eat scambled eggs and drink liguids, soups, she was able to drink a choc shake also, the goiter as they called it was cutting her airway 50%, after surgery the doc (general practitioner) told us it didn't look good, the goiter we'll call it, is growing into and not around which may suggest cancer, say goiter usally grow around, anyway shes having pain in the back of her neck on the left side, kinda right where the muscle goes into the upper part of the head, worried it might be something serious, they sent the mass to a place in california, and were in florida, anyone have any pains in the back of the neck after something like this???? much help appriciated _[removed]_
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I am 52 years old and had my entire thyroid removed 7months ago. The post-opt radioactive iodine treatment was not fun. I was lethargic and my legs felt like lead weights. However, I resumed working soon after. Except for weight gain during that phase, I have felt fine ever since. The cancer scared the hell out of me and I have been vigilant with diet and exercise. I look better than ever and have 15 more lbs. left to my goal. People tell me I look better now than before the surgery. I did not have any hair loss although constipation was a problem. My moods are fine as is my marriage--best it's ever been. We are going to Paris for our 25th.
This does not have to wreck your life.
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I had a thyroidectomy 1 week ago for thyroid cancer. I feel okay but I've heard of people complaining of excessive weight gain and other bad side effects from surgery like mood swings and depression. I'm on thyroid pills and I hope that will help with these side effects. Can someone let me know if there was any good side effects from thyroid surgery and how to deal with the weight gain etc.
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The doctors never warned me about my calcium levels and I had the same problems with the spasms. It feel like your whole body has needles and pinns and like there is a corsette around your waist pulling tighter & tighter. It has been a year and 7 months since the op. and I still have problems with my calcium. As soon as my period starts, it worstens. I do suffer from mood swings, hardened skin around my fingernails and I have no sexual urges anymore. I used to weigh 55-58 kg, now I way a wopping 84 kgs and I don't know how to get ridd of it. Everybody tells me to eat this or try that, but what they don't understand is that I have now metabolism. I do suffer from depression and I am so scared of chasing everybody Icare about away from me. Luckely I have a wonderfull boyfriend that stands by me every step of the way. If anybody can give me sound advice I would really like for them to contact me 'cause I don't know what to do anymore! 0760771700 South Africa Klerksdorp :'(
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I had a total thyroidectomy 2 weeks ago. I was started on full replacement dose (175 mcg) immediately afterwards. Hopefully this will help me skip the "hypothyroid" period and weight gain. I had hypothyroid before surgery and was taking 100 mcg. In about 2 weeks im going to have rai ablation with thyrogen shots. So I wont have to go off my medicine at all.
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I was told today that I need to have my thyroid completely removed. Although my biopsy was negative, my thyroglobulin was almost triple what it should be and the Dr. said this is a marker for cancer. Now, however, after doing research on the Internet, I couldn't find anything about this and after reading the nightmare posts of complications after surgery, I am thinking I should refuse to have this surgery. Does anyone know anything about thyroglobulin? Also, is there another way to diagnose cancer of the thyroid? More biopsies are not feasible because although I only have 5 or 6 large masses, I have many, many smaller ones.

Thanks,
Trish
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If your wife has an endocrinologist she should see him/her in the planning process. I am in the same position and have been told by my endo that once the levels are regulated you can have a normal pregnancy. BUt that you remain on your medication and it needs to be adjusted throughout the pregnancy. Hope this helps!!
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Not to worry I was in surgery for an hour and a half. My throat was a little sore didn't need medicine for pain. Came home the day after. we ate on the way home. No problem swallowing everything went well. I did more waiting before surgery I went to Pittsburgh for my surgery. I had a very good Dr. and a lot of prayer. Take care and don't worry.''
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