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Hello everyone,

I have a brother who is working abroad. He is doing fine, he made a good life for himself and he is sending us some money from time to time since he has bunch of it now.

Anyway, he had to see his doctor a few days ago and he told me that he is supposed to have this Ross procedure done. I don't know anything about it and he wouldn't tell me more, probably because he didn't want me to worry about it.

I was wondering if anyone can tell me what are the most common complications and risks of Ross procedure?

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Hello Stradivarius,

The Ross Procedure is a type of specialized aortic valve surgery where the patient's diseased aortic valve is replaced with his or her own pulmonary valve. The pulmonary valve is then replaced with cryopreserved cadaveric pulmonary valve. In children and young adults, or older particularly active patients, this procedure offers several advantages over traditional aortic valve replacement with manufactured prostheses.

This procedure involves some risk, like all other procedures, but I wouldn't worry much about it since these cases in which risks occur are very rare. However, it would be good if someone who knows about these risks could tell you more.

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Hey Stradivarius,

Although questionable durability has tempered enthusiasm for the Ross procedure in the last decade, the perioperative risks of the Ross procedure relative to conventional aortic valve replacement are not well described.

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database was used to review all Ross procedures performed between 1994 and 2010. The utilization of the procedure in the database was assessed. Then the preoperative comorbidities, patient demographics, and risk factors were reviewed, as were intraoperative and perioperative outcomes.

The data suggests that the Ross procedure is associated with greater perioperative morbidity and mortality risks compared with conventional aortic valve replacement. Recognition of these risks along with durability concerns have resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of Ross procedures performed in North America in the last decade.
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Wow, I didn't expect this to be such a dangerous procedure. You really do sound like an enciclopedia, mate.

I'll be sure to tell my brother about how this Ross procedure is dangerous and that he probably shouldn't do it, there have to be other procedures that can be done in order to help him. I mean, do you know if there are any other procedures which would be able to help him? I mean, if there are, why would his doctor recommend him to do this Ross procedure, does he want him to die or something? Please give me some more info.

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Hello there! Ross procedure was worst experience in my life. I just don’t want to remember it. Actually, the Ross Procedure is technically much more demanding than conventional aortic valve replacement. This is important in patients who are older and have other health conditions. There is an increased risk of completing the surgery in the short term, and there is less benefit to the long term outcomes when compared to young individuals. For this reason, not all patients are a candidate for the Ross Procedure. I am pretty sure that I was not one of those candidates. But who knows…
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Complications can occur, that is for sure. My maid of honor had a lot complications after Ross procedure and I believe that she still feels some uncomfortable things and that she is feeling a little bit weird about it. She could not explain to me. I don’t know a lot about it since all that I  have heard that the Ross Procedure is a more technically challenging surgery for the cardiac surgeon to perform. Also, we all have to remember that in the Ross Procedure both the pulmonary and aortic valves are removed. I believe that this is one reason why it is complicated. 

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Good day guys. I do agree that bleeding is the most common complication during and after ross procedure. It can happen to everyone and I think that my doctor mentioned me that bleeding usually happens in 97 percent of the patient after the surgery. That is pretty normal and it goes away really soon, so I think that you don't have to be scared. My cousin recovered really fast from it and he was bleeding as well. So I suppose that everything is going to be OK with you as well. Keep up with positive mind. Have a nice day.

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Hey there. You should know that nothing is perfect after some procedure and that you can expect to have a lot complications after and during certain procedure. I found this fact online recently - Other procedures, such as replacement of the ascending aorta for aneurysm, mitral valve surgery, and atrial septal defect (19 patients total) have more to do with the patients' cardiovascular pathology than the fact that they had a previous Ross procedure. In spite of these complex and extensive reoperative procedures, only one patient died–a remarkably low operative mortality of only 1.8%. It is really good how they get those statistics but they are so true.
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Hello,

My husband, who is in his early 30's, had the Ross procedure as a teen. It was a severely traumatic experience. He bled excessively and so the surgeon had to go back and re-operate immediately (as the anasthesia was wearing off, might I add). Due to the rushed nature of this second operation he developed an infection and had to be operated on again three weeks later. He recently received a TAVR to replace the aortic valve which was experiencing stenosis. The TAVR (which is generally reserved for high risk patients at the moment) went great. Nearly everything that could have gone wrong (besides death) did with the Ross. Check out US News for top hospitals for heart surgery and get a second opinion. Find one that is fairly convenient to travel to that is highly ranked. We did for the TAVR and we are very pleased with the outcome. Not all hospitals and heart surgeons are the same.
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Hi
My 22 year old daughter had her 'Ross procedure' on 1st March and seems to be doing great so far apart from the expected aches and pains,
I just stumbled across this page and wondered if your brother had his procedure and how did it go?
My daughter was discharged only 5 days after her procedure which really concerned me as the doctors said that one of her lungs hadn't reinflated yet after the surgery which was causing a lot of pain
The statistics given to her beforehand all appeared to be positive stating that some patients had gone anything from 10 to 30 years without needing any more surgery but I supposed that would depend on each individual
My daughter was told that due to her age a mechanical valve would not be any good especially if she was planning on having children in the future,, they also steered her against having a tissue valve as due to her age it would only maybe last 5 years and then she would need a mechanical valve so rather than put herself through another surgery so soon she opted for the Ross
As we're less than a fortnight in since the procedure it's hard to tell how things will pan out but fingers crossed she will start to have a better quality of life than she did before the op
As your post is from 12 months ago I would really love to hear how your brother is doing now?
Kind regards
Helen
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