Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

Hello. My name is Ellie and I am 47 years old. I have problem with aortic valve and I need to have the surgery as well. My doctor told me that I need to repair it. But I also have some other health condition and one of them is diabetes as well. And now I am scared because of it. So, I really want to know one thing - which patients can undergo aortic valve repair? Can I? If I can't what are the best option for it and are there any other options? Tnx in advance and I hope that you will answer me. 

Loading...

Hello there dear guest. I suppose that your doctor should tell you more about this. Have you even asked him what do you want to know? Well here are some good news. According to some research and some experiences a lot of doctors made a conclusion that most patients can go under very successful aortic valve surgery, with minimal morbidity and mortality rates. Those patients remain at risk for the development of recurrent aortic insufficiency and most of the will require definitive valve replacement. It looks like that you have a very good luck, but don’t bother your doctor with asking for more information. Good luck.

Reply

Loading...

Hello everyone. Yes, this is pretty much safe procedure and the mortality rate is very, very low. But in case if you have a diabetes, I don't know what to tell you. Diabetes can only make things worse for the patient when it comes to any disease. So it is very important to consult your doctor and ask him a couple of questions about this. I am not sure what the procedure is for the patients who are dealing with aortic valve repair. I am sure that there is an explanation and some good way, but I believe that it is risky.  

Reply

Loading...

Good day. Yes, I am aware that my diabetes can be a huge problem for me. I know that it was extremely big problem in every part of my life as well. I just don't know how to explain you how I feel because of it. I feel - weird. That is why I am extremely scared to have any kind of the surgery. Especially when it comes to arotic valve repair. And sure that I am going to ask my doctor about this, I will ask him how big problem my diabetes is and I will see what he is going to tell me. But also, I want to know what can go wrong because of it?
Reply

Loading...

I don't know, I don't think that diabetes should present a problem here. Usually, age is the most important thing when having heart surgeries, but since people who have aortic valve repair are usually older than 65, it doesn't represent a risk here.

I'm not sure, your doctor will tell you like you already concluded above, but I think that you won't have any trouble with undergoing aortic valve repair because of your diabetes. It shouldn't be connected with anything regarding this procedure and therefore you should be okay, unless you have any other severe heart conditions, which I honestly doubt you do.

Reply

Loading...

Bee is right, age is not a problem here, and neither is diabetes. Your age shouldn't stop you from having valve replacement surgery.

There are other health problems that may increase the risks of surgery, though. These include coronary artery disease, heart failure, advanced cancer, and brain problems because of a stroke. If you have other serious health problems, it's important to think about whether surgery will improve your quality of life and your chances of living a longer life. Your doctor is going to evaluate your situation the best, I mean, I'm guessing that he already did so if he told you to undergo aortic valve repair, you should be fine.
Reply

Loading...

Hey Guest,

Basically, valve replacement surgery has a high rate of success and a low risk of causing other problems if you are otherwise healthy.

In people who do not have left ventricular heart failure, the risk of death from surgery ranges from 2% to 5%. That means that out of 100 people who have the surgery, 2 to 5 people will die and 95 to 98 people will live.

The risk is lower for people who have the surgery when they are younger than 70. Out of 100 of these people, 1 will die and 99 will live. The risk of death is higher in people who have left ventricular heart failure and other signs that their heart is not working well.
Reply

Loading...

Well, even if valve replacement surgery is a success, you may have problems after surgery, such as an increased risk of blood clots. 

These can break off and cause a stroke or heart attack. To reduce the risk of blood clots, you will take a blood-thinning medicine. You may need another replacement valve. This will depend on the type of valve you get and how long you live after you have the surgery. You may have incomplete relief from symptoms. Some types of valves do not have openings as wide as a normal valve for a person your size. This can limit how well the valve works to relieve your symptoms.

Reply

Loading...