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I'm quite into my cycling but recently have taken up running (easier to get a quick work out with running) - and i was wondering whether my cycling fitness will give me a headstart with building my running fitness. What do you think?

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i am sure it will... they are both cardio exercises and i believe if you have cycling endurance it should help with running...

any results yet?
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I believe these two activities will certainly help each other, by virtue of the fact that both target your legs, and are cardio exercises. So also, good for your heart.
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I'm a mountain biker who has taken up running for a year now.

I found that running helped improved my cycling as I don't feel struggle for breath as much before.

It doesn't feel like the cycling helped my running in terms of giving an advantage.

I wonder what the views are of a runner who has recently taken up cycling.
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I'm a runner who started taking up cycling and i found that my wall wasn't set by how hard i was breathing but more by my muscles not being use to being worked so hard (the lactic acid got to me).
I think it's safe to conclude that biking builds up your muscles leaving your lungs behind and running focuses on your cardio leaving your muscles behind.
I believe that is why running helps with biking and biking doesn't help as much with running. Running doesn't require the muscles you get from biking but more the cardio which biking doesn't help with as much, while going from running to biking you just don't have the muscles that are use to so much lactate acid.
I wonder how biking helps with sprints...
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I've been cycle commuting for awhile and also am transitioning to running as well, and I agree with Swax6302's perspective.
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It should definitely help! The motion is very similar, and you're working your heart and lugs just fine.

The only thing I would be careful about is keeping a higher cadence. If you do a low cadence (80s and below), that will mean you are using your leg muscles more than your cardio. This could result in gaining some mass in your legs. Depending on your current body type, this could be detrimental to your running.

I do both, and I think they compliment each other well. Just keep that cadence around 90-100!
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yes, i think it will
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I'm sure it will help.
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As a longtime runner who takes training seriously, I started mountain biking a year ago to rehab a stress fracture. I started with strong cardio and low quad endurance. I trained hard and my cycling fitness quickly improved. I thought my run times would improve as well due to the cross training but they didn't. I'm a much better cyclist now but the same runner. Go figure. I found running benefits cyclists much more than cycling benefits runners.
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