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Hello, dear parents. I am writing this to you because I am really worried about my son. He is 27 years old and I think that he is now into some bad company. I don't like his friends and whenever I tell this to him, we run into a huge fight. He is former lymphoma patient and I am scared for his health. A lot. He is drinking alcohol with his friends almost every night, especially he does this often now when his girl dumped him. He complains about the chest pain and whenever I tell him that this is because of alcohol, he gets mad at me. I don't know what to do. 

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Hi there. I really don't want to pretend to be a doctor, because I am not the one. I would like to suggest you go with him at his doctor as soon as possible. I am pretty sure that alcohol drinking has also been associated with reduced risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, so that is why I believe that this chest pain after drinking alcohol has nothing to do with it. I know that this is terrifying, and that is why you should visit a doctor. Anyway, I am against alcohol all the time, I am not drinking it so I would recommend anyone to stay away from it...

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Good day!

Here is what is going on when you are drinking alcohol. About half of people with lymphoma or who had this as well,  will have enlarged lymph nodes. Now, it doesn't have to be a case, but in some people, the affected lymph nodes can become painful after drinking alcohol. That is what happened to him. Even if he is a former patient, drinking alcohol stimulates the kidneys and it can cause them to excrete more fluid from the body. Anyway, I would suggest him to stay away from alcohol, because it can't help him at all. Good luck! 

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Don't know much about this and I may sound like a coward to you, but I would not drink any type of alcohol with this type of diagnose. I see that you are aware of how this serious can be, and I also see that you can't help your son because, for some reasons, he wants to drink alcohol. He is 27 years old and I still do believe that in those years you can be mature and be aware of some facts that can put your life in danger. So, I think that you should really talk to him that way - tell him very honest what can happen to him. It can lead to even more serious issues, trust me.
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It is a huge risk, I agree. You have reasons to be worried about your son. He was a lymphoma patient, but drinking alcohol can make him have this problem again. Why? Well, because excessive drinking and drinking during and even after some diagnose, that can be serious or less serious, has a negative social and health impact. According to that, it is very difficult to define what is moderate and what is excessive, but I would say that this is exactly this situation - when someone who is healed from something like this issue continues to drink alcohol. It is not good for him and his health. 

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I know folks, but it continues. I have tried to talk to him, but it doesn't make a sense at all. He continues to do whatever he wants, he is drinking ( I am not saying that he is drinking every night, he is drinking on the weekly basis) but I am scared for him. A lot. We run into a huge fight about this issue, he told me that he is fine, that he is healthy and that I jinx everything all the time. He doesn't want to talk to me about this, according to his words he is totally recovered. I talked to his doctor and he told me that he needs to be careful because this issue can return. Because of the alcohol impact. Is that really true?
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I understand that is difficult to explain to your kids that you really want what is best for them. In some part of their life, they just don't understand this, but I agree that he has enough years to understand it. I know that you are worried, but you see that your words only have a counter and there is nothing you can do about it. Tell his doctor that the next time, when your son goes to see him, he tells him about all the dangers that can happen if he continues to consume alcohol. Maybe he will believe doctors words. 

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Look, smoking and heavy alcohol consumption actually reduce survival in non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and I really don't think that it is matter are we talking about former patients or current patients. I think that their destiny is pretty much the same. When you are diagnosed with a certain issue, there are huge chances that you can get this issue back again, no matter are you healed or not.  I see your reason to be worried about this, but I also want to say that it doesn't have to be all that black. Maybe he is not drinking that much, maybe those are just his words because he wants to be accepted in his company again. 

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