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Can lung transplant help my grandchild in a fight against cystic fibrosis? She was diagnosed with this illness when she was only two weeks old, and we have been trying to find the way for her to feel better since then. Even though doctors said that there is no concrete cure, only medicaments for keeping it under control, we are not giving up. Is there someone who knows something about cystic fibrosis and lung transplant?

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Lung transplant is something like the last line of defense. You have to be aware that there is a solid percentage of possibility that your granddaughter's body will reject the replacement organ. If that happens, the outcome is tragic. But, if the operation is successful, then the little one has a fair chance not to defeat the illness, but to live longer and a bit healthier and easier.
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I am 35 years old in March. I was born with cystic fibrosis. My parents found out right at birth. I had a blockage in my intestine and needed surgery the day I was born. Through my teen years I spent a lot of time in the hospital. It got to the point I needed IV meds at home also O2 24 hours a day. I tried my hardest to be who I always had been and through God's help I got through it. In 98 I had my lung transplant and I wouldn't change it for the world. My mom and aunt were my donors, and that makes it that more special to me . So if your grandchild is at the point where every breath is like the hardest thing to do, or even as the easiest things in life are hard then I would check it out. I know I kept how I felt to myself cuz I wanted to deal with a lot on my own and they (mom and dad) dealt with enough. So remember that too. It's not a fun life for anyone but you can get through it. God Bless.
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I am a 26 year old female and I was transplanted 3 years ago. At seven months old, my parents were informed that I had Cystic Fibrosis and told that the life expectancy at the time was 13 years old. I never knew that transplant was an option for me, until I graduated high school and my lung capacity had dropped considerably. After reading your question about what to say to your grandson, my suggestion is this... Don't put all your hope in one day receiving a transplant. There are so many new drugs now and research is being done to develop and discover many new medicines to help patients with CF. CF life expectancy is about 37 years old due to the advances of medicine over the past 15 years. I did the study for Tobi, a common drug now, and I truly believe that is why I lasted as long as I did before needing my transplant. Who knows what could still be discovered.

Transplantation isn't a cure or the answer. Its like trading diseases. I'm currently on 23 medications and still have to do a breathing machine, not to mention all the blood draws and doctors visits I'll have to do for the rest of my life. Before I was transplanted, I was on oxygen 24/7 and couldn't even climb a flight of stairs without stopping midway to catch my breathe. I lost all motivation to continue. At that point in a CF patients life, yeah, I'd say go for a transplant. But by getting a transplant you are risking A LOT. You are worried constantly that you may get sick (a common cold is guaranteed 5 days in the hospital) and have to deal with the side effects of a lot of new drugs.

With all this to say, if a transplant is necessary, it is also the greatest gift you will ever receive. Although I was at a point that I didn't care if I lived or not, even 6 months out of surgery was worth all my pain. The day after my transplant, I had rosey cheeks and a huge smile. At the time, I broke a hospital record and was out in 6 days. I have been able to travel, work full time, and the best of all, I recently got married. I feel like I've had a second chance at life. So my final advice, live the life you have to the fullest. Although transplant seems like an easy thing to do or look forward to, it should still be a last resort.
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