Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

I am curious:

1) whether you've done multiple half or full marathons, what did you do differently for subsequent ones than the first and why?

2) what additions to your overall training methodology have given you huge returns? the least?

3) what's your favorite part of your training program? least?

I'm currently reflective and see things I do now that I didn't then, and vice versa. Looking for different perspectives.

Loading...

1) After my first marathon I worked on reducing my time and trying to qualify for Boston. Went from 4:25 marthon time down to 3:50. But since then have been stuck around the 4 hour mark, primarily because I've decided I like running the half and full marathons strictly for my health and travel, particularly for racing. Thus, I use walk breaks more often in my full marathons and enjoy them a little more. My goals have changed from being concerned so much about Boston to being able to run distance runs into my 60's injury free, which are still 9 years away but getting closer.

2)For the marathons the walk breaks have given me the biggest returns letting me finish marathons without looking and feeling really sick and nauseous nor enjoying the race. I don't use walk breaks in my half marathons and below so there I work more on my speed drills. The least - probably too much time on chasing every philosophy from Jeff Galloway to Pfitzinger, Daniels and numberous internet articles. You can drive yourself insane trying to find the one "right" training method.

3) I love the training cycle for my marathons. They force me to stay in shape and keep up with my doctor to make sure my heart and blood pressure stay in check. Least is occasionally having to cancel a race I've already paid for.

Reply

Loading...

El, my answer in short to your questios are
1) A steady overall increase in consistant mileage.
Why? I wanted to run good marathons and realised that a slow build up without injury was best.
2) No additions as such, a general, and I stress flexible running program with short term and long term goals. The majority of my running is, on natural ground tracks, paddocks, beach. I believe this is what has kept me running until today (nearing the big 60) avoid roads like the plague. When I was younger I was more specific about the type of training, it depends on your goals. I also learn't the value of REST.
3)Favourite training? No favourite's. Any training that is moving you closer to your goal and is specific to your event.
In fact training is a joy and a race is just the cream on the cake
Reply

Loading...

Your avatar offends me. It needs to have a "wannabe" in front of it.

Since the only thing I qualify for is the multiple halfs, and I don't train for them, as evidenced by my blazing times, I can't give you much insight that means a thing.

As I train for marathon #3, I think the increased base mileage and speed work has really helped. My past 3 long runs of 18, 21, and 20 have seemed easy. Easy as in very little recovery time, as well as feeling I could continue running. Of course, I've yet to run the race, so I can't back any of this up with race results.

I love everything about training for a marathon. I gripe and complain about doing Yassos, but secretly, I enjoy it once I get started. I much prefer training over racing.
Reply

Loading...

My favorite part is the self coaching. The self discovery and "experiment of one". Knowing what works and what doesn't physiologically is an amazing trip. Few in this world get the understanding of their own body as a self coached endurance athlete do.
My least favorite... probably the time commitment. Life is so short and if there was a way to compress hours of training even more, I'd be there.
Reply

Loading...

1) more miles. period.

2) learning that every run has a purpose and staying within that purpose. If the purpose is easy then stay at an easy pace.....don't drop it down to sub 7's "because I can". I learned to run slow in training to run fast on race day. The best addition to my marathon training---marathon-paced runs and threshold runs. least---intervals (but I do them once in awhile to remember why I'm a marathoner and NOT a 5k runner)

3)favorite? I love, love, love my long runs. There are days that you find that pace and you know you could run it all day. Least? Marathon-paced runs. They are tough mentally to prepare for. It's a test of your training.
(I have one in a few days :puke: )
Reply

Loading...

1) whether you've done multiple half or full marathons, what did you do differently for subsequent ones than the first and why? Trained a little different. My focus on subsequent ones was on the event, not my self. I did my 2nd and 3rd marathons for charity. 4th and 5th were with my brother. 4th to get him finished, so I focused on him finishing. 5th one was one to help him fine tune his running. I also was very poorly trained, I decided to run only 8 weeks prior, and it was when Abby was still very sick. 2) what additions to your overall training methodology have given you huge returns? the least? nutrition, (vitamins, in race fueling and post race recovery) has been the best. clothing, high tech fabrics make me more comfortable hrm, has really helped my pace least speed work for marathon training. 3) what's your favorite part of your training program? least? I love the long run, the planning, and seeing how close to the plan I actually stay. I love planing the whole thing. least is the amount of time it takes, I wish I had more time to train but due a lot of demands on me because of Abby, I cannot devote that kind of time to run and train I'm currently reflective and see things I do now that I didn't then, and vice versa. Looking for different perspective. Perspective is the key word. The first is usually about yourself. Subsequent ones are reassuring yourself. I became more focused and knew I did not have to prove anything anymore. les than .5 % of people in this country have finished a marathon. It says a lot about the person who finishes. My time does not matter it never will. Reflect on why you want to continue, is there a selfish reason or are you trying to beat a demon? Trying to show someome up? Want to tackle the next mountain. If you do that, you will never be happy. I am okay with challenging yourself (not you Lori, anyone) but do not become obsessed with it. There are people that training for big events take you away from. Time is precious, use it wisely.
Reply

Loading...

While I have done multiple marathons, the things I've done differently were as much bad as good as referenced by my times - 3:53, 2:49, 5:25, DNF (in that order!). I was actually in better shape each time, just the races themselves went badly. So, thinking more in terms of half marathons:

The biggest change has been more mileage. The difference between running a half off of 30 mpw and 90 mpw is huge. This is even more of a difference with marathon. Now I look at 70 mile weeks and think "I need to up my mileage to get ready for a half."

Another major change related to upping the mileage is running doubles. I only do them on weekdays, but it makes a big difference. When split between 12 runs per week, the high mileage doesn't seem bad at all.

My favorite part of the training program is obviously racing. This doesn't just mean the goal race(s), but also throwing in some low key ones as well. The actual workouts I enjoy most are timed tempo runs and long intervals, mostly because these are the closest training runs to actual racing. I really can't stand the long runs, which is why I don't do them unless specifically training for a marathon.
Reply

Loading...

5:25????? uh....were you unconscious for awhile??? I would think that if you ran a 10k and then walked the next 20.....you'd beat that time
that said. I had a friend that took two naps during an ironman.
Reply

Loading...

:fubby:
My wise and always witty marathoning roommate contends there needs to be an untimed nap and snack time at around mile 13 or 14 of a marathon, then resume. Sounds like a great idea to me
Nothing to add here...continue....
Reply

Loading...

Hopefully not during the swimming part!
Reply

Loading...

Well, not unconscious, but I did spend an hour in a medical van. That made that mile split 1 hour an 20 minutes! I think my half splits were 1:21 and 4:04 which has to be the worst splits ever. I tried to drop out at 18 miles, but they had no transportation so I was forced to walk. The shortest route was the course itself, so officially I finished but I consider it more of a DNF.
Reply

Loading...

1) whether you've done multiple half or full marathons, what did you do differently for subsequent ones than the first and why?

I've only run 3 1/2 marathons. # 1 was excellent, setting the PR record of course!
# 2 was disapointing. However, it was ran right in the middle of training for the marathon, there was no taper (I think one day) and I think the no-taper and weather played into me not hitting my goals.
#3 was excellent. I think, since this 1/2 marathon was "just a training run" in the marathon training plan, it turned out so well. A few things about #3:
1. My foot hurt so I actually didn't run for 3 days prior to the 1/2, so mini- taper in effect;
2. Due to marathon training, I had 3-5 runs longer than the 1/2
marathon already done (didn't have this for 1/2 # 2). Running 13.1 seemed much more easy after a few 18 or so milers in!
3. Weather. Weather was beautiful for the run, lower temps.


2) what additions to your overall training methodology have given you huge returns? the least?

Long runs. Getting the miles in. The least? I haven't been a runner long enough to tell. Right now, everything helps.

3) what's your favorite part of your training program? least?
I love my long runs. I like races that are 5 miles long.
Least favorite? Injuries.
Reply

Loading...