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Hello im 25 years old my dad is 50 and has been on a methadone maintenance program for the past 8 years before that he was a heroin addict for about 12-15 years the past year me and my family have been trying to convince my father to kick the methadone he always says how its a deadly withdraw and when he does taper down he always goes back up sometime higher than he was before which really makes me think he just like the way it makes him feel (gets him high for free) recently my mother has went with him to his program and talked with counselors about him getting off my father has hepatitis nd he was always a thin man ever since the methadone his stomach has gotta very large i feel the methadone is killing my father i need help

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Hey youngking. This is probably something you don't want to hear, but sometimes it's just best to stay on a 'maintenance' prescription. As your dad has mentioned in the past he had tried to reduce ending up returning to methadone and even at a higher dose than he was previously taking. Longer term users sometimes seem to manage best when they stay on a maintained does. It's nothing to do with wanting a 'free legal/prescribed high' as the amount of methadone prescribed is not usually enough to have euphoric effects especially if you have been on the dose for many years, then it is just a case of taking to avoid the inevitable withdrawal they will have if they don't take their daily dose. 

Why is it you want your dad to stop taking the medication?  If it is an amount where he has managed to stop using illegal drugs and not become involved with the crime that often goes hand in hand with funding an expensive habit why risk possibly having that situation arise again.   If your dad was at a stage where he wanted to reduce the drug service would or should work with him to reduce by an amount he is comfortable with and halt the reduction or even up the dosage again of problems arise.  Detoxes are only ever really successful when the user is ready or wants to come off either the drugs they are/were using or the medication used to substitute them.  There are however alternatives to methadone, not all patients are able to take these due to various reasons for example their current dose may be too high or they may use other prescribed medication that would interact with these drugs, but for many users it is becoming a preferred alternative ,  and maybe something worth looking into if your dad is happy to switch.

I'm not sure of the prescribing name other than in the UK but 'subutex' a name for 'buprenorphine' has been used in the UK for a few years now.  It can help users totally stop using opiates as the use of any on top of this medication sends the user into withdrawal, as you have learned this is something any drug user wants to avoid.  Users often say they feel more clear headed on this medication and are able to reduce more easier.  I'm not sure on it's usage for 'maintenance' as I think it is more so used for shorter term, but it may be something to consider.  If this is not possible or your dad can't reduce at this time is it really such an issue.  Many people are reliant on medication daily for other ailments.  An older person with insomnia for example may be prescribed Valium.  No body questions this or looks down on it, yet it is also responsible for causing addiction and can be misused.  Because it has been issued by a Dr to an older person with a 'socially acceptable' reason nobody bats an eyelid and no one would try to convince the older person to trade off their Valium for a glass of warm milk and a hot bath.  Are the two situations really that dis similar?

You mentioned your dad's stomach was larger since using methadone.  Although methadone can cause some weight increase,  mainly due to an ex heroin user who has had a poor diet starting to eat well again.  It is unlikely to effect one area.  Is it possible this is related to his Hep?  Perhaps this is something a G.P could look into, or if it's too costly when he next attends a visit with his key worker he could mention it.  I'm not sure again how things work in other countries but sometimes the key-worker can have the prescribing Dr take a look, or has the professional level of access to suggest other medical centers that may have reduced fees of free consultations.

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Youngking, Like your father I'm in my 50's but I've been on methadone for 31 years non stop and it literally saved my life. Now I'm addicted legally but for me the only alternative is going back to the heroin scene or jail or death. I simply cannot deal with the drug craving that results when you try to detox off opiates(methadone,heroin,oxys,dilaudid,etc). My daily dose of methadone has risen over the years but not that much. There is no high really for me, it just keeps me settled down and satisfied, so I can work and deal with normal things that are a part of this life. Don't be too hard on your pa, I bet he would change if he could, but sometimes the addiction is just too strong. That's the danger with these drugs that cause physical addiction. Your body dictates your behaviour and you just have to do the best you can to control it. Its a b***h. It really is. Good luck to you and your dad.
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