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Hi everyone,

I've been talking to a good friend of mine last night. We were chatting about nothing important and while at it, he mentioned Rheumatic heart disease and I was like, this disease is more common in children than in adults, and he didn't agree with me. I'm almost sure that I'm right, am I?

I could swear that I read it somewhere back when I was interested in medicine, and I think that I read this information. Can anyone tell me this for sure, does anyone know? I would really appreciate it, I want to know it for two things; so I can know that I am right, and that I can show him that I'm right.

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Hey Alan,

As far as I know, you are definitely right.

This condition can occur in people at any age, but it mostly occurs in children who are between 5 and 15 years old. So I guess that you can tell to your friend that you were right.

I also remember (if I remember well) that this is caused by a strep throat. My younger sister had a strep throat when the two of us were younger and her doctor told her that it's better that she came to visit him on time, because this can cause rheumatic heart disease which can be quite dangerous.

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Hi everyone,

I'm actually a doctor in one small hospital in a village near my town. I don't have a lot of experience since I've recently started working and I'm also in charge of only small problems that people have with their health, like flues, they come to me so I can redirect them where they need to go.

However, I did learn a lot about rheumatic heart disease in the time of my studies and I can as well tell you that you are right. This is the disease which mostly occurs in children who are around 9 years old, few years more or less, and it is rarely seen in older people.

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Hey guys,

Thank you for your replies, I'm glad that I was right. I mean, if I wasn't, it would mean that I have learned something new, I didn't actually benefit from this in any way but still, it's good to know that you are right.

I'm going to tell this to my friend the first time we see each other. He is kind of a friend who would brag about him being right and you being wrong. It's not in a bad way, it's more for fun, but I don't like it anyway. Now I'm going to brag about me being right.

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Hello there. It is true that it is more common in children in many countries of the world, especially in developing countries and especially lately. The global burden of disease caused by rheumatic fever currently falls disproportionately on children living in the developing world, especially where poverty is widespread.  To cut long story short, it is actually a chronic heart condition caused by rheumatic fever that can be prevented and controlled. Rheumatic fever is caused by a preceding group A streptococcal infection. Treating strep throat with antibiotics can prevent rheumatic fever. I really do hate when something is more common in children, I am very sad about it.

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Unfortunately, it is. Symptoms of rheumatic fever may include: fever, joint swelling, tenderness, redness over multiple joints, very small bumps or nodules under the skin, rash, weight loss, tiredness, stomach pain, etc. Rheumatic fever may cause serious, permanent damage to the valves of the heart of the children. Very often it damages the mitral valve, aortic valve or even both of them. These valves act like doors in the heart that allow blood to pass between or out of the chambers on the left side of the heart. If the valves are damaged by rheumatic fever, they may not be able to open fully.

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Good day there. Like everyone already told you, it is true. It is very important that people with this problem have the treatment immediately.  Medical therapy in rheumatic heart disease includes attempts to prevent rheumatic fever and some other rheumatic disease. In patients who develop rheumatic heart disease, therapy is directed toward eliminating the group A streptococcal pharyngitis suppressing inflammation from the autoimmune response, and providing supportive treatment for congestive heart failure. That therapy is determined by your doctor. Following the resolution of the acute episode, subsequent therapy is directed towards preventing recurrent rheumatic heart disease in children and monitoring for the complications and sequelae of chronic rheumatic heart disease in adults.

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