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Hello everyone. I am seriously worried about my daughter. She came back from some business trip and she needed to get back urgently because she was not feeling OK. She went to see doctor while she was there, in Spain, and after some quick checkup he told her that he believes that she is having mitral insufficiency. She has an appointment with her doctor tomorrow to see what has really happened, but I can't wait! I need to ask someone in here some questions about it, maybe I will be much calmer. I want to know  what is the most common cause of Mitral Insufficiency?

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Hey there Lilly. I am really sorry about your daughter. I really hope that they made some mistake there in Spain and that she will be OK after her doctor do some tests. Maybe it is just stress or something else. But inform us, please.

Now I will try to answer on your question. Look, the mitral valve opens when blood flows from the left atrium to the left ventricle and in that case, the flaps close to prevent the blood that has just passed into the left ventricle from flowing backward. In mitral valve regurgitation, the mitral valve doesn't close tightly and that is the main cause. You should also know that with each heartbeat, some blood from the left ventricle flows backward into the left atrium instead of moving forward into the aorta. In that case it can happen that your heart “puts” the blood back.

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Hey Lilly,

Mitral valve regurgitation is classified as primary and secondary. Primary mitral valve regurgitation is caused by an abnormality in the mitral valve. Secondary mitral valve regurgitation is caused by an abnormality in the left ventricle of the heart.

There is quite a number of possible causes of mitral insufficiency. These include  mitral valve prolapse, damaged tissue cords, rheumatic fever, endocarditis, heart attack, abnormality of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy), trauma, congenital heart defects, certain drugs, or radiation therapy. Stress can add to these causes so if she was under a lot of stress recently, maybe because of her work, it might be that as well.

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Yes, there are indeed a lot of things that can cause mitral infufficiency and contribute to the development of mitral valve regurgitation.

Several factors can increase your risk of mitral valve regurgitation, including a history of mitral valve prolapse or mitral valve stenosis, a heart attack, heart disease, use of certain medications (people who take drugs containing ergotamine (Cafergot, Migergot) and similar medicines for migraines and those who took pergolide (now off the market) or who take cabergoline have an increased risk of mitral regurgitation. Similar problems were noted with the appetite suppressants fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine, which are no longer sold), infections such as endocarditis or rheumatic fever, congenital heart disease, and age.

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Hey Lilly,

That can't be right. I mean, there is always some chance that they are right but without any tests being done, they can't possibly conclude that she has mitral insufficiency. Symptoms of this matter are blood flowing turbulently through your heart (heart murmur), shortness of breath (dyspnea), especially with exertion or when you lie down, fatigue, especially during times of increased activity, heart palpitations — sensations of a rapid, fluttering heartbeat and swollen feet or ankles.

Now, these symptoms are also symptoms of a lot of other things, and she doesn't even necessary has to have any of these. I'm thinking that these doctors weren't right.
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Hi there.

I am not so sure, but I think that once I read somewhere that mitral regurgitation is defined as an abnormal reversal of blood that flows trough the left ventricle to the left atrium. This mitral insufficiency usually caused by disruption in any part of the mitral valve apparatus and the most common etiologies of MR include MV prolapse, infective endocarditis, annular calcification and even the ischemic heart diseases. My friend had this problem after ischemic heart disease so I believe that my story now has a point, right? But that is all I know, I think that this is a little bit complicated subject.

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