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Hi! I have friend whose child was diagnosed with corneal disease called lattice dystrophy. Their son is a very cute 4 year old boy. The boy’s condition was discovered during the routine eye check up, and although he sometimes did complain that his eye hurt, we were all rather surprised. The doctor prescribed some ointment and eye drops to prevent the friction and thus the pain too. He also gave the child an eye patch. My friends were not very happy with this, as you can imagine. Is there any new treatment for corneal disease in children that would solve their problem?

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I am sure that their doctor knows what he is doing and that if there were some better ways of treating this problem he would apply them. The lattice dystrophy usually occurs in children age two to seven and it causes them to see blurry. Many children don’t report this to parents, and when they are two they cannot even if they try sometimes. The moment when they do speak out is when they feel the pain. When this moment comes they have to use the ointment and eye drops that treat the recurrent epithelial erosion and/or eye patch which prevents them from moving their eye lids and creating the friction that lead to the erosion at the first place. So that is the only right treatment the doctor can advise at this moment.
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Hello! I have a friend who also had this kind of problem with his child when she was seven years old. She didn’t wear an eye patch, but she did use some eye-drops. She was also told by her doctor that people with lattice dystrophy have an excellent chance for a successful transplant. The problem is that disease may also arise in the donor cornea in as little as three years. Namely, almost half of the transplant patients with lattice dystrophy have a recurrence of the disease in between two to 26 years after the operation. I am not sure at what age they usually operate on them though. So it is best to consult the doctor about the future treatment because your friends` child might need transplantation too.
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