Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

:?

I have 13 month old baby and it was fast and easy to get pregnant and have her. I got pregnant with our first try and I had an easy pregnancy and an easy delivery.

Now my husband and I have been trying to get pregnant for the last three months, but this time it seems to be a little harder. Ever since we started trying, I have been getting lower abdominal cramping two weeks before I expect my period. They are very painful cramps.. I thought of perhaps it's an ectopic pregnancy or implantation, but then I ended up getting my period and the cramps went away until two weeks before my period.

I have a history of irregular periods, so it's not a new thing that my period is late, but these cramps are. They feel like menstrual cramps. Sometimes these cramps intensify during sex and when I wipe after sex, there is light spotting with my husband's semen.

Now we are in our third month trying to get pregnant, and my period is late one week. We took a pregnancy test last night, but it came back negative. I am very confused about what is happening to my body and the cramping. My last period was January 30 2007 and we are now in March 10, 2007

It would be great to get some feedback and advise.

Loading...

After you have a baby, your body changes especially hormonally. It is possible this cramping you are feeling is cysts (which form around the time of ovulation) or that you are feeling ovulation (I personally do not understand that but some women swear by it). I would talk to your doctor. Until you have been trying to conceive for 12-18 months usually doctors won't prescribe or do any tests for infertility just yet.
Reply

Loading...

You may have an ovarian cyst. These are common in women and rarely bad enough to even be noticed. I had all the same symptoms but I ignored it. A month later I was in the ER with a morphine drip being told I have a large cyst in my left ovary. If I were you I would see my OB/GYN and ask them to give you an ultra sound.



Latingirl0222 wrote:



I have 13 month old baby and it was fast and easy to get pregnant and have her. I got pregnant with our first try and I had an easy pregnancy and an easy delivery.

Now my husband and I have been trying to get pregnant for the last three months, but this time it seems to be a little harder. Ever since we started trying, I have been getting lower abdominal cramping two weeks before I expect my period. They are very painful cramps.. I thought of perhaps it's an ectopic pregnancy or implantation, but then I ended up getting my period and the cramps went away until two weeks before my period.

I have a history of irregular periods, so it's not a new thing that my period is late, but these cramps are. They feel like menstrual cramps. Sometimes these cramps intensify during sex and when I wipe after sex, there is light spotting with my husband's semen.

Now we are in our third month trying to get pregnant, and my period is late one week. We took a pregnancy test last night, but it came back negative. I am very confused about what is happening to my body and the cramping. My last period was January 30 2007 and we are now in March 10, 2007

It would be great to get some feedback and advise.

Reply

Loading...

Ovulation pain is also known as mittelschmerz, literally meaning 'middle pain' and relating to the time of the cycle it usually occurs. Around one in five women experience this and it can last from a few seconds or minutes to several hours.
It is not usually extremely painful, but is typically sharp and cramping. Normally it is one-sided and the side alters with ovulation. Women don't always alter the side on which they ovulate - it is a random event so could occur on the same side in consecutive cycles.
If the temperature rise that you have noticed is sustained then it probably does indicate that you are ovulating. Checking the basal body temperature (BBT) is a useful way of assessing if you are ovulating, but it is less accurate at determining exactly when.
Even women with regular cycles and BBT increases sometimes ovulate earlier or later than would have been expected based on the temperature rise.
Studies have compared BBT with daily ultrasound scans watching the egg develop and then disappear and it was discovered that BBT accurately determines the day of ovulation only 40-50% of the time.
Other research found that intercourse on or after the day of ovulation is unlikely to result in pregnancy.
If you are timing intercourse it is best to consider this as finding the time 'not to miss' rather than 'only to hit'. Regular intercourse three times per week is advised as the best way of increasing the chances of pregnancy as this will ensure you do not miss ovulation whenever it occurs.
Reply

Loading...