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Hi,
I have this painful bony protrusion behind the little toe, called tailor s bunion
I heard somewhere that the solution is operation but I don’t know whether is this operation of tailor s bunion successful?
Anyone with experience?

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Hey,
My mom had this operation. Before operation of tailor s bunion she had really painful experience with wearing shoes, but after operation, she is cool.
She was also interesting herself whether operating tailor s bunion is successful and doctors told us that more than 95 percent of tailor s bunion operations are successful in correcting the deformity.
So, hurry up and get a tailor s bunion operation

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It is killing the experience. It was something that I was not able to stand no more. Just like many of other people, I was waiting to get to the surgery because I was scared that something can go wrong. But basically, it is just like some other easy surgeries - it is going to help you relieve the constant pain that you are feeling all the time. There are so many bunionette pain relief that can help you deal with the pain after the surgery. When it comes to success rate, this surgery is really successful so there is no reason to be worried. When I did it and when all this recovery process went by, I was wondering why I haven't done this before.  

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in junior high and high school, i was VERY active in sports, so i was constantly on my feet. my feet ALWAYS HURT..i didnt know what the problem was, though. i always had the protrusion on both of my feet, but i never thought anything of it. my freshman year in high school, i went to a podiatrist and he told me i had tailors bunions. my right foot was WAY worse than my left, so i decided to have the surgery done on my right foot during the summer so i didnt miss any sports. i was 15 then. things went well. i was in a lot of pain for a while from the surgery, but my foot looked and felt SOOOO much better after healing. a little over a year later, the same pain came back. i told my mom, so i went back to the same doctor and had more xrays done. my bone was forcing the screw that had been put in my foot during the first surgery out. so...i had to have ANOTHER foot surgery to remove the screw. this one was not near as big of a deal. i was off of my foot for about two weeks, then i recooperated and was fine. well, i am now 19 years old and i am in college. last week, i had to go back to the same doctor because my feet are absolutely KILLING ME! my right foot especially....well, come to find out, i have to have ANOTHER surgery. my pinky toe and fourth toe are completely motionless. the tendons in them didnt heal correctly after the first surgery and they are too short, so they pull those toes downward and at an inward angle. therefore, causing much pain and discomfort at the site of my previous tailors bunion due to all the pressure. my toes are now sideways ALL the time. so, as soon as my insurance gets worked out, i will have my third surgery on my tailors bunion. the bunion was taken care of during the first surgery. the metatarsal was straightened just fine. BUT....because of that surgery, more and more has been wrong with my foot. i would think LONG AND HARD before having it....

Brittney
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Hi Brittney

I thank you for sharing this story with everyone. I too saw a doctor for my feet for the first time when I was 14. Who thankfully at the time told me I was too young and should not have the surgery and it should be an absolute last resort. I have always had more problems with the bunions themselves, particularly on right foot. I got back into dancing in high school and after my freshman year of college I was dancing all the time plus walking all over campus and driving more back and forth to home city, I found myself driving more with my left foot as I still switch back and forth all the time now.

Anyway, my mom found this other doctor we went to see him he was all about doing the surgery so I did and lost like the whole following year of my life. I wore the same tennis shoes and limped for a year. My foot finally got CLOSE to being how it was before the surgery, bunion had come back within first year. When you have problems as young as us, their due more to structure problems and how we walk. Its very important to wear proper shoes and orthotics as I'm sure our doctors did not address.

I have 2 screws in my right foot and almost had the bunionectomy completely redone but he was gonna break it in like 3 places and after my first experience I just chickened out the morning of. Thankfully b/c I'm from new orleans and it was the same month of katrina. Anyway, now one screw is going through my bone and I'm just having the screws taken out in a few days. They've been in for over 5 years so I'm worried if it'll be harder to take out since most are taken out within 2 yrs.

I've thought about redoing the right bunion or doing the left. Right one completely back like before but the muscles are now weaker in the area.



I'm 25 used to dance, teach aerobics, and be a trainer, on top of my fitness lifestyle and it hurts just to stand around in tennis shoes.



I've worked in physical therapy and have seen all I need to see. People please think 2 and 3 times before jumping and doing a surgery, a surgeon is almost always going to be ready to do it, thats what they do! It's not easy when you have screws and whatnot in feet, ankles, wherever that you're on every single day.



More than likely just searching for and finding the proper shoes to fit your feet in conjunction with specially made orthotics will reduce and limit your problem from progressing which is really all you can do. Most people who say they have great results may end up having problems later or arent really active. You cant just buy any cheap unsupportive shoes and make your foot make the shoe fit.



All this is just gonna result in a lot of problems later on and most people regret it. Take care of this now in the proper way and save surgery to when you don't want to live an active lifestyle anymore.



Take care
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Okay, I know this post may be old, but I figured it may help someone that may be going through this at this time. I had surgery to correct a Tailor's Bunion on May 20th, 2008. I was doing really well with it, but my cast boot that was given to me to wear had gotten a little big due to shrinking of my leg and foot, which is normal when wearing a cast. The only problem with that is when I walked with the boot, it allowed too much room for my foot to move. So, now I am having surgery again on Friday to correct a fracture to my foot and re-correct the abnormal curve in my foot, that was the problem to start with. So, here is a little advice... Be sure that your cast boot fits properly, if you think you could get your foot out of it with out unfastening it, tell your doctor, even if they say your insurance may not cover a new one. Having your foot get well the first time, is way more important than worrying about your insurance covering or not covering a new boot. If all else fails, just pay for the boot yourself. Most doctor offices will let you pay out what you owe anyway. Also...DO NOT WALK ON YOUR FOOT WITHOUT YOUR CAST BOOT ON! I probably did a little more of this than I should have also, so that may have contributed to my fracture as well :cry: .
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I am 22 years old. Have had tailor's bunion my whole life - hereditary. Over the years, a callus has form over the bunions, makes that area of my feet look ugly, ugly to wear strappy heels because the tailor's bunions stick out, can't find shoes wide enough. Doctor recommended surgery, but after reading some of these posts, I'm hesitant now. Should I just wait until I'm less active when I'm older? I don't wear sandals in the summer because my feet are embarassing. For the pain, I've been working on buying wider and more comfy shoes.
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This post IS old, but I'm throwing my two cents in. When I lived in California 30 years ago, I had a tailor bunion removed in the podiatrist's office. Now, living in England, it has returned, and there are no podiatrists who perform this procedure. I have to go to my GP who then refers me to a surgeon where it becomes an operation. By the way, I also had a cast on the foot the last time, and didn't receive the proper physical therapy which further screwed it up.
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