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i got acrylic nails done and now the top side of all my fingers are very itchy and sore. wanted to know if this was at all normal or if i should remove the nail. thanks! :-(

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Guest wrote:

i got acrylic nails done and now the top side of all my fingers are very itchy and sore. wanted to know if this was at all normal or if i should remove the nail. thanks! :( [/quote


:? i have had acrylics many times in the past-and thats never happened to me before. my guess would be either ur allergic to the acrylic [they usually have alternatives if u ask at the nail salon] or ur allergic to something they used like the oil or products. another solution might be to go to a different salon...i heard that some of the cheaper places are not as clean as they need to be and u could have gotten an infection or irratation from thier tools if they werent properly sterolized. ;
keep in mind that your nails are bound to be sore the first 2 days after getting them because of all the grinding and pressure it puts on them.

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I have been doing acrylic on my nails for 20 years and never had a problem untill just recently my curticles and fingers itch like crazy too. We stopped using the cuticle oil thinking thats was it and but its not. im thinking of trying Gel and see if that stops my finger and nails from itching.If i find out anymore info to why this is happeneing i will post it.
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I have been getting my nails done for about 15 years now. For the first 14 years I was getting acrylic nails but last year I switched to gel nails. I never once had problems. All of a sudden about 2 months ago, i startd getting the red, puffy, itchy fingers. My cuticles look terrible and hurt so bad. I use cortizone cream to help with the itchyness but it hardley works now. So unfortunatly, Im going to have to take them off. I dont think there is anything else that can be done at this point. Im going to stick it out for now but the reaction is relentless!!
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Ive had my nails done for 15 years and three years at the same salon with the same lady. Recently, after getting a fill, my nails are itchy and burning me I really dont know what to do.....maybe there is a bad product on the market the salons are using because it's cheap. :-(
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Guest wrote:

Guest wrote:

i got acrylic nails done and now the top side of all my fingers are very itchy and sore. wanted to know if this was at all normal or if i should remove the nail. thanks! :( [/quote


keep in mind that your nails are bound to be sore the first 2 days after getting them because of all the grinding and pressure it puts on them.



I disagree. Nail services, including the application of either acrylic or UV gel nail enhancements should never hurt, or cause the client any discomfort in any way. You mention "all the grinding and pressure it puts on them" and "your nails are bound to be sore the first 2 days after getting them." If I am understanding you correctly, you are saying this is normal, and something to be expected? Improper useage of a 'drill' (e-file) by an unskilled nail technician is the #1 cause of discomfort and pain both during, and after the nails service has been performed. This should never be the case. Experiencing ANY pain, or discomfort during and/or after any nail services is NOT normal by any means. Receiving professional nail services should always be a relaxing, pleasurable - and pain-free experience.

In my experience as a nail professional, this all too often happens in what are referred to in the nail industry as "Discount salons," or "NNS" (Non-Standard Salons). These are typically the type of salon that charges rock bottom prices, much lower than standard salons and spas charge for similar services. 'Discount' salons are generally unsanitary, they often employ unskilled and inexperienced (and many times - unlicensed) staff members for very low wages, no overtime pay. They typically work long hours with little or no rest breaks. No, it's not right and people should never be treated like slave workers, but it's reality and it does happen to this very day in almost every major city in the modernized world. In order to make a profit while charging such low prices, these salons will do whatever is necessary to keep costs down to a bare minimum, usually at the expense of the clients themselves. They are placed at a much greater risk of developing serious health conditions from the use of unsanitary implements, and cheap, substandard nail products that are known to be harmful to the clients of these establishments.

One of the ways used to cut costs is through the use of acrylic monomers (AKA, the 'liquid' component of acrylic nails) which contain a hazardous substance called "MMA" (Methyl Methacrylate). The reason for using these monomers is simply because they are dirt cheap in comparison to the much safer, and much more expensive monomers which contain "EMA" (Ethyl Methacrylate). For example, a gallon of MMA liquid costs an average of $15-$30. One gallon of "EMA" liquid monomer costs in excess of $225. The difference in cost is quite obviously enourmous. But, the risks involved with the use of MMA are much greater than with an EMA monomer. EMA is a safe, and effective chemical which has become the standard of most acrylic nail monomers on the market today. Nonetheless, MMA is still alive and well, and is readily available through the black market.

Only three atoms distinguish the difference between EMA and MMA. However, this small chemical difference makes EMA much safer.
My point is this: MMA chemicals do not adhere to natural nails well, and require a mechanical bond for proper adhesion. Because of this, the nail technicians who use this product must 'rough' up the surface of the nail. This is typically done with a 'drill.' That alone is the reason why so very many people who go to 'discount' salons for nail services will so often complain of being in pain both during, and after the application of acrylic nails. When your natural nails have been filed down to paper thin proportions - yes, they are going to hurt.

When "EMA" liquid monomer is used, no such drilling is necessary because EMA, by it's very nature, creates a chemical bond which adheres very well to the natural nails. As a result, the natural nails are not heavily drilled as in the case of MMA, and there is no pain or discomfort involved in the process - either before, or after the nail services have been performed.

My advice to anyone seeking professional nail services is to avoid NSS, or 'discount' salons. True, you may save some money by going to one of these salons, but the risks are way too great for any potential savings to even begin to be worthwhile. After all, your good health and well being should be more important to you than the idea of saving a few dollars. Find a reputable salon with experienced nail techs who use nothing but the highest quality nail products, not cheap MMA. You'll pay more for their services, but it's so worth it.

Just my opinion...
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I can sympathize with you on the itchiness. I had the acryllic nails for 5+ years and all of a sudden developed the same problem....... incredible itchiness about 6 hours after and then it would get worse with each application; finally cracked skin around the cuticles and sore to the touch. I stopped getting the acryllic, let my fingers heal and then tried the gels. No problems at all - at least for a year. NOW all of a sudden the same thing is happening. I don't go to a discount salon and I know they are using the OP-1 gels. If anyone has any answers as to why this is happening, please let me know. I don't want to have to have them removed but the itching is so bad right now, I can't stand it.
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It sounds like a case of contact dermatitis. Only a doctor can tell you for certain what is causing it. Contact dermatitis can occur when the skin surrounding the nail comes into direct contact with either gel or acrylic products. An allergy of this type does not happen overnight. It can take many months before any symptoms begin to appear. Overexposure can cause an allergic reactions of the type you described. In terms of artificial nails, overexposure is almost always the fault of the nail technician - usually from sloppy application techniques. The thing about an allergy is that once a person becomes allergic to a something, it never goes away. Further exposure to the allergen(s) only worsens symptoms.

BTW, you mentioned that the salon uses "OP-1" products? Did you mean to say "OPI" instead? OPI is a major player in the nail industry. However, in the case of contact dermatitis, it does not matter which product line a tech may be using. The very best nail products can be used, and if a tech is sloppy, or is using improper application techniques - then an allergic reaction can, and often will occur. As I said, this takes time to develop. Being exposed once or twice to a potential allergen causes no harm. Repeated exposure is the cause of contact dermatitis.

Unfortunately, IF your reaction is being caused by the chemicals used in acrylic, and/or gel products, the only way to stop the allergic reaction is to avoid all contact with whatever chemical is causing it to begin with. IF it IS a chemical from the products being used - no matter the brand, then the remedy is simple: You would need to stop wearing artificial nails. There is one possibility around this. Try wraps. They are not acrylic - or acrylate based nails. These are cyanoacrylate based nails. This is the same chemical found in super glue, krazy glue, and so on. This sometimes works for people with allergies to acrylic and/or UV gel chemical allergies.

I hope this helps...
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I have been wearing acrylics for a long time, probably 6 years now. I travel about 15 miles to the salon and pay 60.00 for a full set, and 25.00 for a fill. The very first few times i got them done, i went to a salon around the corner and paid 30.00 for a full set and 15.00 for a fill. I noticed the person before me getting hers done, i took her seat when she was finished. The girl (operator) never switched out the file on the drill, and i noticed she used the same hand held file on me that she used on the person before me. She knicked me a few times making me bleed and all i got was "oh, so sorry" as she continued to whittle away on my fingers.
When she used the drill, i could feel the burn and i could smell my nails burning. My fingers killed me for about 3 or 4 days after that. My finger tips were so sore. I went back for a fill which was worse. She picked the bottom of the nail off with a fat pair of scissor looking nippers, catching the fake part and tearing my nail bed. That was it for me. I found this place where i go now and i swear by them. Never a problem with sore fingers, or skin tears. You have to pay the buck but it's worth it.
And i actually get a cup of coffee at this salon!!
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As a general rule of thumb, as with most things in life you get what you pay for....Well, generally speaking, this is true. Of course, there are exceptions to every rule.
It's really good that you were able to find a tech that you are quite satisfied with who does things the 'right' way. As long as you are satisfied with the services you are getting, definitely stay with this technician. Good techs are not really that easy to find. And the ones that are good do charge more for their services because they are generally worth it. So once you find a tech you are happy with, don't lose her! There are many techs, including myself, who take a lot of pride in their work, and always give their very best with each and every client that comes into the salon. But, I believe there are more techs than not out there working in the nail industry who don't take their careers as seriously as they should, and are capable of performing only limited nail services simply because they don't keep up with trends and techniques, product chemistry which evolves over time, technology, and continuing their education on an ongoing basis. This type of tech is very limited in the services they are able to do, and do only a mediocre job at best when doing the services they can perform. I have seen so very many nail techs who have been in the business for 10, 15 or more years who are still doing nails the very same way they were taught in nail school - using the same products they learned with, using the same techniques (often improper, or outdated), and so on. They just never change! Then again, this holds true for almost every profession. Some people take their jobs seriously, others don't. That's just life I guess.
As a side note: Drills (AKA electric files or 'e-file') are safe provided they are designed for use on nails, and the tech has been trained and certified in the proper use of them. "Dremel' drills are commonly used in the cheaper salons, and these are not designed for use on nails nor were they ever intended to be such a tool. These are designed for use in woodworking and other hobbies and are illegal to use on nails in several states, including the state of Texas. Only a properly designed 'drill' may be used on nails. Of course, experience with these tools is important since an unskilled tech can cause serious damage or trauma to the nail bed, resulting in pain, and in some cases, permanent damage to the nail(s). This can occur just as easily no matter what type of drill the tech is using. The drills I own each cost over $450. And even though they are some of the very best e-files available to nail technicians, they can be still be quite harmful, if not dangerous in the hands of an unskilled technician. It takes a lot of practice to master the use of these tools. It's a skill that is acquired only through proper and thorough training, and lots of experience with them. I've had a few mistakes happen in the beginning - nothing serious, thankfully. Everyone makes mistakes. The important thing though is to learn from our mistakes, and make sure they don't happen again of at all possible. But, some people never learn. The bottom line is essentially this: "Drills don't hurt people. People hurt people."

Sorry this was so long. I could talk 'nails' all day long and not get tired of it...
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I don't think it's the products. It's not allergy to acrylic or gel liquid or powder. I experienced this burning, intense itching sensation from approx 6mths ago (Incidentally I have been wearing acrylic or gel overlay over my nails now for 10yrs+). I believe it is the electric file and the way it is used that is responsible. I got my nails done in the states where they use completely different products and the same burning itch occured after use of the file. By the way ACRYLIC is banned in the state of new york and numerous other states, many salons will only work with gel and were surprised when my friends went for a refill and were wearing acrylic! I suggest you ask your technician politely to take extra care with the file........
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It most certainly be contact dermatitis. It is not uncommon for someone to wear nail enhancements for many years before developing an allergy to one or more of the chemical components used in either gel, or acrylic enhancement systems. Some develop an allergic reaction after only a short term exposure. Most people never develop any allergic reactions to the chemical(s). But, it does happen, and severe itching is a classic symptom of contact dermatitis.







False. The products used in the U.S. are not different than those used in other countries. The product line brand names may vary somewhat, but the chemical components of the basic nail enhancement systems (gels, acrylic, and wraps) are essentially the same all over the world. They all contain components from one or more of three basic branches of the acrylate family of chemicals.







False. Acrylics - as in acrylic nails, are not banned in the state of New York. If you are talking about MMA, that's a different story. But acrylic nails have not been banned by any state in the U.S. including NY.
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In response to the comments made by My2cents; before you take the word of a nail products supplier as to what is safe or not check out these Department of Labor pages about EMA and MMA.

osha.gov/dts/chemicalsampling/data/CH_240620.html

osha.gov/dts/sltc/methods/organic/org094/org094.html

Additionally, the glues that are routinely used include p-toluidine as an accelerator (promotes drying) which is toxic, and believed to be carcinogenic.

Acrylic nails are extraordinarily dangerous due to these chemicals. If all you get is itchy fingers, consider yourself lucky. People who apply these nails are even more exposed and susceptible.
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My girlfriend has been doing my nails for 15 yrs. She is extremely clean and only uses the best products. She works at a high end salon and has an extremely great reputation. Yet a few months ago I also had the itchy, burning reaction. We went from acrylic to gels to changing primers 5 times. None of it worked. She even called the companies to see if something changed. It hasn't. I also have been having dry itchy eyes. I wear contacts and had to change them. I can only wear them a few hrs at a time. I don't know what's going on. Anyone having this problem?
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As most of the folks who posted to this blog, I have also had my nails done for many years. I continuously patroned the local "chop shops" without much more than a complaint here or there in regards to a nick or cut from the e-file. However, within the past 4 months I've had TERRIBLE reactions to the product that is clear-purple, sitting in an unmarked dish with a small lid on every desk in every nail salon I've come into contact with during this 4 month duration. The chemical, as it turns out is the infamous MMA that we have all been preached to about. I narrowed my reaction (which only gets worse and worse with any contact I have with the chemical...including breathing it in) down to the MMA monomer by requesting permission to use a dab or two of all the products my tech was using to compile my nails. I applied little drops down my arm, starting with the purple liquid that is used to adhere the acrylic powder and cause it to harden. This spot, has been red and itchy for 3 months. The dermatitis on my hand is the tell-tale sign that overexposure (during my 11 years of fake nail abuse) to MMA monomer has caused my body to physically freak out when I come into contact with it.

About 10 hours (If I'm lucky, and it doesn't set in sooner) post nail application, my fingertips begin to itch. Not like, "Oh, I have an itch...I'm going to scratch it and that will be the end of it..." OH NO! This is like "PLEASE FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT IS GOOD IN THIS WORLD, PLEASE STOP ITCHING....I JUST WANT TO SLEEP, IT'S BEEN TWO WEEKS!" Yeah...the itching is not slowed down or made minutely acceptable by ANY cream you can purchase, or by any cream that we will ever be able to purchase. The two things that helped me through the first three weeks of my reaction was lots and lots andlotsandlotsandlots of Benadryl and (it sounds crazy) dipping my fingertips in Vicks Vapor Rub and then sleeping with socks on my hands. The menthol cooled the itching and burning, and the petroleum jelly helped with the skin under my natural nail that was peeling, cracking, and bleeding. It totally bites having socks on your hands all night with slimy cold stuff under your nails, but believe me...those of us who have had the great displeasure of knowing "the itch"...anything that helps is a God-send.

After this hellacious experience, I've chosen to research this chemical...I did find direct information in regards to the reaction I was having on the FDA's website. The article clearly outlined ALL of the symptoms I was experiencing and went on to tell the story of MMA monomer. If you go to the FDA site and search in the upper right corner for "MMA Monomer" the article will pop up. This chemical IS NOT illegal in the United States. In the 70's, the FDA received so many complaints like mine that they issued a warning on the adverse effects of the chemical, but never banned it. I think this is absolutely absurd do to the fact that Internet is riddled with women who have lost feeling in their fingertips, lost their real nails, and experience the blisters-under-the-real-nail-greatness of MMA monomer. The thing is, the women who didn't know what the chemical was capable of doing, and continued getting exposed to it have results that are PERMANENT! The chemical can cause you to lose feeling in your fingertips FOREVER. It makes me wonder how many little evils there really are out there that nobody wants to tell us about or keep us from.
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