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Hi everyone

Could anyone please help me with this nasty inconvenience?

I have this dry skin around my cuticles and it is actually splitting in places. You know where you have these bits of little skin and you are very tempted to rip them off, and when you do it leaves you with a painful little wound? I have lots of those going on. Could it be that this is a vitamin deficiency? And if this is the case, how the hell do I solve it? It is very annoying. It has been going on for several months now and I would really appreciate advice on how to make it go away.

Thank you. 

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You are talking about peeling skin around the nails, where the skin becomes very dry and it starts peeling off by itself, right? This is a common problem that many people have, but it can be caused by numerous different things so you will want to look into what is causing the problem in your case. An allergic reaction to latex, or some household product you are using, or nail polish, or even the hand cream you thought would keep your hands nice and hydrated, can all cause peeling skin around the nails. A yeast infection of the nails can cause peeling around the skin as well, and then you have to get antibiotics to get rid of that. Eczema can do it as well. It is true that a vitamin or mineral deficiency, especially a calcium deficiency, can also cause you to have pretty dry skin, but in that case you are probably seeing it elsewhere as well. Obviously dry skin is most likely to peel in areas where you use it most, such as the hands. In this case, yes, you can get a blood test done not just for your nails but for your general health as well. Those lines on your nails are another sign of a vitamin or mineral deficiency. Do you have that?
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I think you are onto something. Our nails and the skin around them tell one hell of a story about our health. If it's depressions in the nails that you are seeing, then you need to be tested for anemia. On the other hand, that dry skin around your nails may well be a sign of a deficiency in vitamins A and C. I would get a blood test if I were in your boat just because I'd want to have the full picture. There's nothing wrong with starting drinking fresh orange juice every morning or taking a vitamin C tablet every day though. 

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Did you just develop this problem recently? If the answer is yes, then I say the cooler temperatures and higher winds of the fall are to blame for your dry cuticles. That always happens to me too. You should be applying a vitamin E oil to your cuticles and nails a few times a day and you will soon have less dry cuticles. Maybe also increase your water intake? We need more water when the weather gets cooler.
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So, I was watching this Embarrassing Bodies thing Channel 4 has on last night, and on there a lady came in with really dry skin around her cuticles. Like, really dry skin. Not the kind of dry skin I sometimes get but like, bleeding and scabby type dry skin, you know? It was BAD. She also had white kind of markings on her actual nails. So that doctor bloke, Doctor Christian, asks that lady if she has psoriasis. The lady answers yes, she does. So he says, well that explains those nails then. 

I didn't reply to this thread before 'cause I really know nothing about nails and stuff but I immediately though of the OP when I saw them nails. Think you could have something like that going on? Just Google psoriasis nails and see if yours look anything like that. Just goes to show that things you think of as an awkward annoyance can actually be the sign of a serious issue. I'd say if I had something like that I'd definitely be checking in with my GP. Mind you, that lady was told that unfortunately it's really hard to cure that stuff. He even mentioned putting fake nails to cover the markings and said really high doses of steroids could do something for the dry skin. 

Thought I'd mention that anyways in case it can be of some help to you.

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Yes, nasty skin conditions can easily lead to problems with dry skin around the nails and on the cuticles. For most of us, it's just that we don't take proper care of that area of our bodies, so I'd start with some simple tips and see if you can improve things.

1. Moisturize your cuticles and the skin right above them with an alcohol free moisturizer.
2. Wear disposable plastic (not rubber) gloves over night with royal amounts of moisturizer to give your hands a bit of a mask.
3. Stay away from things that are bad for the skin on your hands and for your nails. Wear gloves while doing the dishes, wear gloves when it is cold out, and please don't put acetone on your skin when you remove nail polish. You can find plenty of acetone free nail polish removers.
4. Keep on moisturizing, several times a day if necessary.

I'm willing to bet that your nails will look a lot better.
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Hi,

Dry and cracked skin around the nails can be a sign of a nutritional deficiency or two. It might be helpful for you to check if you have any other signs of nutritional deficiencies? They include brittle hair, restless leg syndrome, leg cramps, frequent tiredness, and being prone to illness. If any of that sounds familiar to you, I would make an appointment to get full bloodwork done. Brittle nails and dry skin around the nails is most often a sign of a vitamin B deficiency, but also sometimes omega 3 fatty acids. You can have both at the same time.

Hope that helps and that you get it sorted.
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Hi Caralynn,

Please look into taking Biotin for your dry cuticles. Biotin is a B vitamin, and though it is actually hard to prove that you have a deficiency, several studies have shown that taking Biotin will strengthen the nails. You will need to have a chat with your doctor or nail tech to talk about the right dose for you, and from the time you start taking it you will need about two months to see noticeable improvements. If you have brittle nails along with dry cuticles, Biotin will take care of that as well.

Regards,

WW

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Hey,

The following are some signs of vitamin deficiency you want to look out for. 

  1. Cold hands
  2. White spots on the nails
  3. Ridges on your nails
  4. Brittle, soft nails
  5. Dry skin, especially on the face and then concentrated around the sides of your nose
  6. Bleeding gums and gum disease
  7. Dark circles under your eyes
  8. Muscle cramps
  9. Hair loss or thin and brittle hair
  10. Feeling weak and fatigued
  11. Cracks around your lips

So in your case, you should be looking at the big picture rather than at your nails alone. Not all of these signs point to a deficiency in the same vitamins and minerals, but if your diet is generally poor you will be deficient in more than one nutrient for sure. If you only have the dry skin around your nails minus any other of these signs, then you should probably be examining environmental factors as a cause of your dry skin around your nails — the winter months expose you to cold and dry air, which dries your skin out. Household chemicals, not drying your hands after washing them, your laundry detergent, and even hand creams that your skin doesn't agree with can all be causes of dry skin around your nails and problems with your cuticles. It does not have to be a nutrient deficiency. So my advice would be to get it checked out.

Rosie

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Have you tried these cures for dry cuticles? If not, I would start there.

- Stop using hand creams, lotions, nail polish, nail polish remover and other products for a while, as they can cause damage to your skin.
- Wear gloves for household work to avoid causing chemical induced damage to your skin.
- Use only almond oil on the skin to hydrate your skin, cuticles and nails.
- Stop cutting your nails. Only file them. Do not push your cuticles back. Never, ever cut them.
- Make sure you incorporate vitamins A, C, E and B into your diet. These all contribute to nail and skin health.
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Me too!!! Right now. I'm sure it's the cold weather basically and not having had enough time to really pamper my hands. I do admin I haven't been eating the best I could, busy like crazy and all that, so vitamin deficiencies could be at play I guess, but I don't think so. I'm gonna shop around for a nice cream for my cuticles and perhaps get a gel mani to give me the motivation to keep the rest of my hands looking nice too. Might as well get nail, skin and hair vitamins while I'm at it just in case it helps...

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Antibiotics make yeast infections worse, there did not treat them. Antibiotics kill all bacteria, good and bad, which causes yeast infections. Probiotics, yogurt and a few other things treat yeast infections.

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It can be a vitamin deficiency. It is good to consult a doctor before trying any DIY methods.

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