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Hiya, 

Bit of a specific question here I'm afraid, but please bear with me and share your knowledge if you know anything about this... I'm kinda trying to use natural makeup products to keep my skin looking its best and to stay healthy. Not all the time, but I'm really putting in an effort to eliminate high street cheapo chemical makeup from my arsenal. Now, a mate and I were chatting and she mentioned that 77491 black iron oxide powder is a heavy metal that has bad consequences for your skin and health over the long run. That was the first I'd heard about that, but it wouldn't be the first time I was trying to do something good for my skin only to find out it's got side effects. 

So I was curious about your knowledge/opinion. Is 77491 black iron oxide powder good or bad? What can you tell me about it?

Tah!

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This is an interesting question. I don't know anything about the number you shared, but I looked up information about black iron oxide powder in general, and it appears that this is being used in many different products! What I found out is that they were historically used in tattoo pigments but that they fade over time. Right now, it seems that they interact with MRI machines, which can never be a good thing, and that they can cause allergic reactions as well. 

That's just about all I can find out about them for the moment, but I will look more. Do you think this pigment is present in nearly all black makeup, such as eyeliner and mascara, or is it just mineral makeup?

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If you do not have any particular skin problems, I would just use whatever makeup you want and then stop using products that happen to be bad for your skin. 

Things like pigment codes become important where you are suffering from particular skin problems. If you have eczema, for inside, you may be told, by a dermatologist, to keep an eye out for certain color codes and to avoid them. CI77491 is one of those pigments that you'll often be told to avoid in that case, along with some others like CI 77489 and CI77499. 

Once you get started on that kind of project, it may seem like those pigments are literally everywhere. What you want to do in that case is look for products without those pigments on the internet, to give you some idea as to what to buy instead. 

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Iron oxide pigments in makeup are also problematic for any person who has a nickel allergy, since these pigments are known to sometimes give off nickel. When you have a nickel allergy, the hunt for makeup products that are suitable for you is a difficult one: iron oxides are in so many makeup products, including most liquid foundations!

I did find a list of makeup products that do not contain iron oxides somewhere (100% pure is one brand you can often work with), but you can also ask a knowledgeable dermatologist to recommend you particular makeup items if you need to avoid iron oxides.
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Huh? I use makeup of course, but I have never paid meticulous care to specific things that are put in it, or any care at all for that matter. I assume that everything put in makeup is tested and approved before it goes on the market, unless you are buying makeup that someone made at home. Of course, some people will be allergic to specific minerals, pigments, or whatever, and they will have to take care. I can't imagine that the general public without allergies or skin conditions needs to pay attention to that kind of thing though. If the makeup is not causing any bad reactions, it's fine, no?
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Celebrity
478 posts
Hey,

If you look around, you will see that more people than you would expect are having trouble with the CI77491 black iron oxide pigment. You would think, wouldn't you, that everything that goes on your face is tested in advance to make sure only very few people have issues with particular ingredients? That is not so, or rather, perhaps the people on which makeup is tested aren't people who have the same kind of skin you have.

Geishas used to use lead based makeup. Nobody would argue that that is a good idea. So why these black iron oxides? Part of being a responsible consumer is informing yourself about the ingredients used in your skin products.

Rosie
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