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Hi! I am 55 and my working days ended not so long ago. I now live a quiet life in the country, where I mostly rest, read, take relaxing walks and occasionally weed the small garden I have. Few days ago I started feeling some pain in my right elbow and experiencing some difficulties in moving it and using that arm. My friend had similar syndromes some years before and she was diagnosed with the tennis elbow syndrome. The difference is that he was very active and his job involved lifting heavy things while I am very inactive. Can Lateral epicondilitys occur in people that are not physically active?

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I think you should best go and see a doctor since arm pain can mean many different things. Lateral epicondylitis is called tennis elbow because it is commonly associated with playing tennis, but the injury can happen to almost anybody. It is an idiopathic condition of middle age. Idiopathic means that no one really knows the reasons why it appears. There are even some opposite opinions on how it should be treated; some even say that it goes away on its own.
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I agree that you should see doctors because similar symptoms don’t always mean the same disease. Lateral epicondylitis or ‘tennis elbow’ can be caused by an injury as far as I know, and as we both know you don’t have to be physically active to hurt yourself. So, yes, it is possible for Lateral epicondylitis to occur in people who are not physically active. In fact, the strongest risk factor for lateral epicondylosis is age. The peak incidence is between 30 to 60 years of age. Yet, you might have just bumped your elbow into the door and forgot and the pain will simply wear off in few days. Who knows?
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