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I have always been an avid walker. My wife and I just went on a long hike in the heat, around Yellowstone National Park. We really had a wonderful time and didn't even get to see all of the Park! Now I have been diagnosed with golfer's vasculitis, appearing resulting from the hike. My doctor says it will go away on its own but it is rather unpleasant. Is there anything to do to ease the symptoms?

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Hello there sergent240,

If you are regular on hiking and walking it is very strange to me that you haven’t heard of golfer's vasculitis. This is very common condition for the most of the people who are involved in regular hiking and walking and most of the doctors believe it is heat related. It looks like red patches and basically this is a rash that usually appears above the line of the socks.

Luckily it doesn’t itch or hurt or something like that and it usually passes on its own for a couple of days so you don’t need to worry about it. And in the future you will know what this is and you will not be worried.

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i do not agree that it doesn't hurt- it hurt terrible and the swelling can also be hectic.  my husband get it time and again and experiece terrible pain with the swelling as well.

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I also don't agree. The legs are painful, and the worse it is, the itchier it is. I have to say that the people who say it isn't itchy evidently haven't had a bad case of it. Here's what I experienced last fall while hiking in Yosemite: http://www.mdjunction.com/member/photos/89174?id=76818 . Now THAT was itchy! I was wearing long jeans, so it wasn't insect bites, sunburn, poison ivy, etc. It has happened on every vacation I've had since 1985 that involved hiking in the heat.

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I was diagonised with this condition less than a week ago.  I have also been hiking and walking for years in extreme heat and have never had any problems in my life before.  It does hurt and it's debilitating.  I have had two severe conditions less than a month apart.  The first time it cleared up after a week and I went back out on a long hike in the heat and had no problems.  There is no pattern as far as I can make out.  Last week I went on another hike in cool weather largely in shade and the rash flared up again more severe than the first time.    It is very uncomfortable and does hurt a lot.

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I was diagnosed with Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis (by biopsy) a few years ago. I'm faced with losing my job due to the pain and rash on the days I do extensive walking of zones. It IS painful. It can also itch - that horrible, stinging itch that you've gotta scratch, but then feels like you've dragged a rake over a sunburn. The swelling is also uncomfortable.

It has always been limited to warm weather, but each year starts earlier and runs later into the fall. Now it's happening in the winter months, too - although not as severe.

I've tried compression socks, different fabrics and laundry soaps, sneakers vs boots and even cold compresses on my ankles. Nothing prevents it. Last night the humidity set off that familiar burning sensation even though I was at a desk for my entire shift. No rash developed, but the minor discomfort continued until I got home, elevated and cooled my legs.

My mother also has vasculitis and nearly died 11 years ago when it went systemic. Treatment with Cytoxin (a chemo drug) put her into remission. Thankfully the heat and walking are not triggers for her.

This disease is no joke and needs to be managed by a recognized rheumatologist.

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I suppose there might be other things going on if many of you are in pain, which I am not.  I am from Southern California and am a letter carrier. I walk over 8 miles a day and in the Summer, many days are extremely hot , like yesterday, it was 111 degrees in JUNE!! I have a terrbile dark red rash all the way up the back of my calves and above my knees. I wear long pants because it is much worse to burn the skin with the sun here. Sometimes my rashes go away in days and sometimes it takes well over a week. Nobody at work heard of what causes this, and I have been looking online for awhile. For me, it rarely itches, never hurts but my weight is where it should be and I am otherwise very healthy. I have had this problem for over 10 years. I guess it will be another 10, because that is when I plan to retire. The thing that bothers me is, it obviously is an autoimmune problem, and I wonder why, on some hot days....no symptoms....so I wonder what else is going on.Also, noted, I am fair skinned. I hear that is a factor and I think it might be because I know of nobody at work that is of darker complexion complaining of this.

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I have this golfers vasculitis year round, no pain just swelling, it only becomes red and blotchy when I walk or stand for long periods of time, however I found a fix, it's called horse chestnut extract.. It works wonder, comes in a cream or a pill. Spread the word.. When I've had the red patches where it was raw to the touch, rub the cream on and the next morning it was gone. Take the pills regularly and your as good as gold..
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I have had this recur over the years and am trying to determine a pattern.  (Like many others, I am over 50, fair skinned.)  Mine is not painful, just tender to the touch -- hideous to look at.  The correlation for me is always this formula:  warm weather (though not necessarily hot) -- full day of walking including extended periods of standing -- for example: 1)  an all day antique show, where we walk for miles, yet have extended periods of standing; 2) all day sightseeing while on vacation -- same deal, with extended periods of standing.  I also read of an individual who experienced this while doing trade shows -- which is the same kind of thing -- lots of walking, lots of standing.  I walk 3 miles almost daily in all kinds of heat/humidity (though I have water with me), and I don't get this with that activity.  I think it's the combination of the intense walking and standing over a long period of time (5+ hours -- just like a golfer might  experience).  Also, wonder if staying uber-hydrated would help on these days, as I tend to avoid drinking fluids when I'm on these all-day outings since bathroom access can often be challenging or hard to find.  I get GV with a variety of different shoes and socks/sandals, wearing skirts/pants. I just got it again yesterday, so may try the horse chestnut extract to see if I note any relief.  I have also read that taking a stiff dose of ibuprofen can help, as well (provided your stomach tolerates that).  

I know people say that GV isn't harmful, but I can't help but think that its recurrence is NOT a good thing.  I mentioned it to my dermatologist once (didn't have it when I saw him), and he brushed it off.  I don't feel comfortable with the notion that I will be getting this for decades to come -- it just can't be good.  I enjoy being outside and active in the warm weather, so would like to find a way to prevent this from occuring.

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My wife, Zenith, has endured so-called Golfers' Vasculitis for many years now. At first we assumed that the rash was caused by fertiliser on the golf course. Visits to numerous internet sites suggest that there is no permanent cure. Then we discovered the miracle properties of lowly domestic Bicarbonate of Soda! It is claimed that most of life's ailments stem from an imbalance of Acid and Alkaline levels in the body. Ordinary bicarb quickly restores any acid/alkaline imbalance by boosting the alkaline count. On a scale of 1-14, it seems the ideal count should be about 7,5. Anything below 7 indicates too much acidity. I started taking bicarb for the odd bout of indigestion ... with instant relief ... before I read about the general acid issue. Zenith started taking bicarb just one month ago (1/2 teaspoon in warm water twice per day) and was astonished to notice that the golfers' rash has all but disappeared! Her friend, Anne, has had a similar "cure" after only two weeks on bicarb. It is still early days and one hesitates to claim bicarbonate of soda as the miracle cure for this (and other?) rashes and ailments, but it would certainly seem to be heading in the right direction. From what I have read on the internet, bicarb is not harmful when used responsibly, so most sufferers of golfers' vasculitis should be quite safe to try it. By the way, we initially bought a pack of litmus strips from our pharmacy to test our acidity levels. Zenith's initial test indicated a very high level of acidity (red), while mine showed alkalinity (blue). I have never suffered from rash on the golf course or anywhere else. In our case, this suggests that there may well be a correlation between high acidic levels and golfers' vasculitis. If this is true, then a regular dose of bicarbonate of soda is precisely "what the Doctor ordered!" Good luck and greetings from South Africa.

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Hello~ same thing here. I get some swelling in my ankle area and the red rash from ankle to just below the knee. I started getting this three years ago after a full day at Busch Gardens. Looked down, saw the rash and was absolutely panic stricken. I thought at first it was maybe due to bad water on the water rides and shaving in the morning before heading out. But then it kept happening every time I'd stand for long periods of time. I'm a 45 year old female. I've noticed that no matter what I'm wearing pant or shoe wise, it happens. My husband and I like to entertain a lot. When we do at our home, everyone stand around our center island in the kitchen and socializes. By the end of the night, my legs are a mess. they don't hurt although I have been able to start telling when it's getting started. On days where I might be cooking a lot, like thanksgiving, same thing. If I spend a day out shopping where there is some walking but a lot of standing, same thing. I have a trip planned with my girlfriends to go to Nashville in a few weeks. We are celebrating a friends 40th birthday with some clubbing and line dancing, shopping and site seeing for a long weekend. I can only imagine what the shape of my legs will be in by the time the weekend is over. Once the rash is there, I try to keep my legs up as much as possible and it takes about a week for it all to go away completely. I do have some area that the rash has "stained" parts of my legs and I don't think it will ever go away. I am so afraid of what my legs will look like in a few more years if I can't find a way to stop this from happening as often as it does. but like a lot of you have said, I've never noticed it if I spend a few hours at the gym exercising. It's the standing for long periods of time that bothers me the worse. But my rash looks just like the golfer's vasculitis you all have been talking about.
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I am 61, been putting up with this GV for the last 15 years.  I did notice it after golfing at first.  But for the last 10 years, I haven't touched a club.  Now I get it while horseback riding!  Or just being out in the sun for a while.  Mine lasts for at least two weeks - no itching or burning, just causes some folks to gasp when they see my legs.  I even get it on my thighs at times.   I might try the tsp of bicarbonate in warm water that someone mentioned works for them.  Will let you know the results when I try that!

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Thank you for all your messages! At least I'm not crazy after all, I KNOW I have GV as well. I have 3 different rashes, not all at the same time, swelling, welt like rashes, hives, sometimes painful itching that spreads, other times the purple pupura (large-ecchymoses(purple bruising)and small-petechia)rashes appear, indicating a problem the "platelet system". I, also, have been diagnosed with Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis (by biopsy). I'm a 48 year old female, had breast cancer and sjogrens syndrome. I'm an avid walker/exerciser. Triggers, long time on feet, sitting to much, traveling, disruption in sleep, late nights, alcohol (once a month), sun, at beach, boots, shoes, tight pants around calves....ughhhh. Everyone believes I'm a fashion icon, when in reality, I'm continually hiding the elephantitus swelling and horrendous rashes!! For two days I haven't been able to wear shoes, would LASIX help? 1) WHO treats this condition dermatologist, rheumatologist or a vascular doctor? (I always hit this roadblock) Thanks you for the suggestions, I am going to try the "horse chestnut extract" as well as the "bicarbonate of soda". Has anyone soaked their feet/legs in the bicarbonate of soda? are there bicarbonate of soda pills? Please offer ANY advice/suggestions/relief or cures.....I am just thankful that I have a diagnosis. Although I am concerned WHAT the underlining long term effects mean? WHAT am I overlooking? Will THIS affect my clotting abilities? WHAT causes this issue in my platelet system? Will it go systemic? All these questions and I have no idea where to turn....
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Where do you get this extract?
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I ordered through amazon, have not received it as of yet
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