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This type of giant blackhead is actually what is called a dilated hair follicle, which results in an enlarged pore in the skin. This then fills with all many of debris and oil, just like a regular blackhead but on a much bigger scale.

Okay, so all of us have had a blackhead or two at some point during our lives, but normally they are just the small, little dots you find in areas such as on your face, your back and shoulders, or even on your chest. But some people unfortunately develop a super-giant blackhead, also known as a Dilated Pore of Winer. These are no tiny little black dots – they can be absolutely huge, needing specialist treatment to remove them.

So What is a Dilated Pore of Winer?

This type of giant blackhead is actually what is called a dilated hair follicle, which results in an enlarged pore in the skin. This then fills with all many of debris and oil, just like a regular blackhead but on a much bigger scale. Dilated Pore was first reported by Winer in 1954, thus Dilated Pore of Winer.[1]

They are nothing to worry about though, as they are completely benign, and are not a form of skin cancer. In fact, you don’t even have to remove them for medical reasons, but most people want them gone for cosmetic purposes. Nobody really wants to walk around with one of those for people to see, especially if they are on the face.

Experts don’t really know what causes these blackheads to develop, only that they are more likely to occur in people who are middle-aged or older and are predominantly seen in young adult males as a solitary brown to black, giant comedo with a central pore. Typically, they are found on the back, usually in hard or impossible to reach places, which is why they tend to grow so big. Most of the time, they are noticed by a friend or a partner, or during a routine medical examination.[2]

What Do They Look Like?

A dilated pore of winer presents as a nodule that is raised, usually on its lonesome, with a tip that is brown or sometimes black. They can be anything from a few millimeters up to a few centimeters in size, most of which is underneath the skin, so what you can see is only the tip.[2]

The most common sites are on the forehead, face, back, chest, and neck or behind the ears. Some can ooze a little pus when squeezed, but this doesn’t mean it is infected. There are no other symptoms, such as pain, irritation, inflammation or itching. They are simply just there.

Diagnosis

Most dilated pore of winers are diagnosed by sight, as they are quite typical in presentation. Sometimes though a dermatologist may examine the surrounding skin using a magnified lens, an examination called dermoscopy. This is undertaken if there is any suspicion at all that the lesion may possibly be cancerous or malignant.

In some cases, the contents of the pore of winer may be sent for testing, to determine what it is constructed of. This may be done to rule out any other diagnosis, but is often not necessary. Lesions of the skin can be varied, from the benign to the life-threatening malignancies, so other conditions may need to be ruled out. Most of the time however, the diagnosing is straightforward. Dilated pore was evaluated as an adnexal benign tumour with follicular differentiation.
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