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I've decided that I'll run a 6 mile training run next Wednesday, and if I can run it sub 40, I'll run the 10k on the 31st. If not, I won't race until the half marathon on 12/4.

Seem logical?

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No. :umno:

Are you only racing if you can place?
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Only for a sub 40.
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Seem logical?
Yes. That's the way I would do it too. If you've got a PR in mind but your training shows that you might not make it, why enter?
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Whadya got to lose?
$20. That and a 3rd disappointing 10k. I too believe in the "race day magic." That's why if I can do a 6 miler in 40, I'm pretty certain I can do 6.2 in under 40 on race day. I don't want to interrupt training and more importantly my motivation and cash flow with a disappointing race, which it will be if I don't break 40. Awards don't even come into play, as with my times I don't feel worthy of any award anyway.
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Seem logical?
Yes. That's the way I would do it too. If you've got a PR in mind but your training shows that you might not make it, why enter? Maybe it's just me, but when I look at my 5km, 8km, 10km & 10M PRs, they all came outta no where. And my second best times are significantly slower. I've got this notion in my head that PR territory isn't a defineable and chartable peak. Yes, planning your training to peak for specific races is the best approach, but sometimes, and again, maybe this is just me and my wacky 25-yrs of doing this, but sometimes PRs creep outta no where. Your legs might not feel the loosest or your taper might have been too long or too short or the course is far from ideal, but somewhere in PR land are mornings that just come together all on their own. And that's part of why I advocate racing at least once a month. Getting out there and benchmarking where you're at. Getting a top end effort to guage the progress and keep a constant goal of a race within a handful of weeks down the road. Plus, I'm a huge voice for the running community and local races can be nothing but helped from local folks just getting out there and plunking the weekend warrior race fee down for whatever the cause might be. :twocents:
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The only way to get better at racing is to race.

Your strategy is better suited for distances of 10 miles or more.

Skipping a race because you don't think you'll get a PR is kind of a copout.
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I too believe there is something about raceday that brings you to a level that is hard to duplicate on a training day. I'd say to enter both the 10km and the halfM. They are both compatible in the same schedule.
The only way to get better at racing is to race. ... Skipping a race because you don't think you'll get a PR is kind of a copout.
The end is near! The Four Horsemen are released! I agree with all of the above. Life as we know is over. :umno:
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Tomorrow, do we avoid eye contact and pretend this never happened or are we supposed to PM each other first thing in the morning? This is kind of weird.
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Tomorrow, do we avoid eye contact and pretend this never happened or are we supposed to PM each other first thing in the morning? This is kind of weird.
Just wear infamous floral print during your run tomorrow in homage to the moment.
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The advantage of being a middle of the pack runner - whether 5k, 10k or marathon is I enter races strictly because I want to and like the event. If I do well in the race, excellent. If I bomb it, continue on to the next race, but don't dwell on it.
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That's a pretty good philosophy
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I've run into a couple problems when deciding to avoid races unless I was really ready. First, I tended to get gun shy about racing. I would only race if I thought I was in great shape, and then I would be really nervous when I did race. The other thing that happens sometimes with me is I need races to get race sharp. I'm usually rusty when I haven't raced in a while, and it takes a few races before I'm really ready to crank again. Let's face it, racing is (or should be) a completely different experience than even the hardest workout.
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