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Why am I getting too sleepy after eating? Every time I finish my meal, I have a feeling I can fall asleep right away. Is something wrong with me?

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I have exactly the same problem and I am thinking of having Narcolepsy...I dont know
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I am researching this very topic because lately I have been excessively sleepy after eating. This has NOT always been the case. I feel the need to respond to the previous answer because in my research thus far I'm finding that there can be many, many different reasons for excessive sleepiness after eating - EXCESSIVE sleepiness is NOT a normal response to a sensible meal (maybe a little tiredness after an overindulgent meal - but this is different). It can be triggered by certain food allergies or intolerances, non-diabetic hypoglycemia, adrenal gland issues, etc. I'm finding that the best way to determine why all of a sudden I can't trust myself to drive a car or work after eating (or anything else for that matter) due to falling asleep at inappropriate times is to go to the doctor and get tests done.
Also - laying down directly after a meal can present big problems for those who live with chronic heartburn or gas issues. The EXPERTS recommend waiting at least an hour or two after eating before laying down. Not to mention that laying down directly after eating slows the metabolism - EXPERTS recommend a walk after a meal. Not sure what credentials the previous poster has - but her answer was well out of range of what is considered the norm.
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A high carb and low protein diet will typically make you groggy after meals...bread, potato, rice has a way with causing bubbles of happiness and contentment in the mind and we get zzzzzzies... early this year when I changed my lunch meal from a whole wheat bread and goat cheese sandwich to a roast beef/ tofu with greens salad my sleepiness immediately decreased.
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On this topic, another thing one should do is an elimination diet (meaning that you try one thing at a time) to see the effects of different foods.
For example: Gluten (wheat, barley, rye), moldy foods (cheese, mushrooms, soy sauce, vinegar), other food allergies (In my case I don't eat eggplant prior to an important brain task such as an exam or language interpretation), high glycemic foods (potato, banana), sugar, lactose free--or reduced--dairy, dairy with lactose. In my personal experience the desperate urge to sleep whereby I am not safe driving is different from the sluggishness associated with dairy. Gluten (I think) and high glycemic foods, sugar (definitely) are clearly part of this picture for me. Incidentally, Wellbutrin (which I built up very slowly 1/8 tablet at a time to the maximum dose) has been great in keeping me going. However, I still think it is worth it to explore foods in case they are at the root of the problem; that is, depressing my system. The idea of getting a personal blood sugar monitor is a good idea also. In my case, although I still check my blood sugar sometimes, I discovered that my blood pressure was rising after meals, and reducing sodium plus getting on blood pressure meds made a huge difference. Good luck to everyone exploring this issue.
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I was interested in this too after a recent biochemistry class, and here are my thoughts:

Carbohydrates absorbed from food will cause blood sugar levels to rise. I am not sure how long after eating, but I do know that the sugars are absorbed in the intestine and passed immediately to the liver (and broken down if complex, or converted to glucose if it is fructose or sucrose).

At this point, every cell in the body is directed to use blood sugar as a source of energy, in order to keep blood sugar levels normal. This means the muscles will be getting energy from blood sugar, the liver will, and fat cells will. They will also convert some of that excess to storage forms (glycogen/fat).

There are two parts of our body that ALWAYS use blood sugar for energy. Those are red blood cells and the brain (unless you haven't eaten for many days, and your brain will use ketone bodies, but that is irrelevant for the average human). Consequently, our blood sugar levels will always be maintained at a certain level in order to keep our red blood cells and our brain functioning.

Up to this point, everything I have said is a fact. Here is where my logic comes in. If the brain basically always uses blood glucose for energy, then the rate limiting factor in its uptake and utilization of glucose cannot be the blood sugar levels. We don't want the brain burning twice the energy just because our blood sugar levels have doubled! Therefore, brain energy utilization should not be affected by eating. At this point, I have a feeling my biochemistry lecture did me no good, because I am no closer to the answer...

Now, it is common knowledge that the body has two states: fight or flight, and rest/relaxation/digestion. Clearly, relaxation goes together with digestion, and evolutionary logic means that this is not a coincidence! Since I ruled out metabolic changes as a result of eating, I would hazard a guess that it has to do with diversion of blood flow (this is possible by constriction of capillary beds at various locations throughout the body) to the digestive organs to provide oxygen necessary for oxidative phosphorylation (necessary in the utilization of the energy-providing glucose). I think one of the previous posters mentioned this.
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Lack of exercise or a sedentary lifestyle triggers this response to meals also. As long as I am working out regulary (3-4 days per week for 20-30mins per day), I have no desire to sleep after meals, but once I'm back to my couch-potato ways, I get very tired after even the smallest meals.

Sugar causes insulin levels in your blood to surge. This triggers your brain to curb its activity. The brain then sends a signal for body function to cease which triggers this "sleep" response.

You can choose to exercise (ez route) and let the body metabolize the sugar itself, or you can continue to be sedentary and lower your sugar intake. Scaling down your meals and eating more frequently (like children naturally do) can also help curb the desire to "nap" after a meal.
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All of the metabolic explanations are sound...what it ultimately boils down to, in addition to the nutritional facts, is that your body is being strongly influenced by parasympathetics which slow your system down, thus, facilitating your body to metabolize rather than be in a "fight or flight" situation (e.g., sympathetics).
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I am 52 year old female, that has always gotten sleepy after starchy meals that is understandable and has been explained a thousand times. But I keep bring this concern to my primary doctor and he keeps giving me the cultural answer : siesta time.
Well what about getting excessively sleepy after a large serving of spinach with 1/2 cup of crumbled feta , some raisins and yellow peppers slices has anything to do with thyroid, or what ? because vegetables are considered okay. Today for example my sleepiness got so overwhelming that I had to go for my bed and ended up sleeping for a good hour +. True the sleepiness did not hit until a half hour later.
Obviously my doctor is not very smart in my opinion since I like to be thorough .. So should I visit an endocrinologist ? . I got my glucose test and I came out normal. Because I have been wandering if it had to do with insulin intolerance. What kind of test should I have ? If Thyroid tests are only good for more severe cases.
thank you for any suggestions. .
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The reason for sleepiness after meals (it is absolutely normals) is a type of neuron called an orexin neuron. These neurons are in the hypothalamus which is a part of the brain which regulates many process and almost all hormones. When your blood sugar level increases, as it will after a mean, the orexin neuron is inhibited from firing. Why would this affect sleepiness? Well, orexin neurons are responsible for controlling our awake state. When they are inhibited we feel sleepy.

If you think of this from an evolutionary perspective, it makes sense, since it would be dangerous for an animal that has just eating to go out and keep searching for food. Instead many animals find a safe space and sleep after a big meal.
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There's quite a few reason why we feel sleepy after eating. So let me explain the few and obvious ones. first reason: Eating sugary foods causes your brain to make lots of neurotransmitters, melatonin. Those are the hormones responsible to make people sleepy head naturally at night. Second reason: like someone else mentioned, lots of your blood are being used to digest your food, "diversion of energy for digestion", having said that, your brain is not starve of oxygenated blood but just getting enough to maximize your digestion thus making you kind of dizzy. Third reason: There is an abnormality on your endocrine system, an excessive reproduction of serotonin or something. Third reason: You are just being lazy, a couch potato, someone who just want to take it easy and relax after eating. I hope this helps.
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I'm a athlete myself, ever since school was out I've been excercising/practicing pretty hard every day. Considering the fact that I live in Texas with the blazing heat of summer I work my body pretty hard for about 6 hours a day. I play competitive tennis, and I have sectionals tommorow so my whole summer is pretty packed with Tennis. Im pretty fit yet still after I eat I get sleepy and usually just go to sleep. I think its pretty normal for your body to get sleepy after eating a decent meal.
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TO SAY IT IS NORMAL TO WANT TO FALL ASLEEP AFTER A MEAL AND THAT ONE SHOULD ACCEPT THAT ONE WILL FEEL SLEEPY UNTIL THE FOOD IS DIGESTED IS ABSURD! I CAN'T FUNCTION. I NEED TO WORK AFTER LUNCH. I AM TALKING ABOUT A HALF A CHICKEN BREAST AND HALF AN AVOCADO (AS AN EXAMPLE) NOT A THANKSGIVING DINNER. I GET MOST OUT OF MY DAY, IF I DON'T EAT AT ALL AND THAT DOESN'T SOUND RIGHT TO ME AS A SOLUTION.

IT HAS BEEN SUGGESTED TO ME THAT IT IS A LIVER PROBLEM. WHAT DO YOU THINK?
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I would accept the idea that it is normal to get sleepy after a meal of carbohydrates....I have deliberately moved to a lunch of chicken and vegetables---not much sugar there (low sugar veggies--spinach, avocado--not carrots and potatoes or corn). To eat lunch and then need to crash desperately after a chicken breast and avocado (no bread) makes no sense to me---and, I must add, this has only happened since I got older (50) and, I walk an hour each day.....I'm having trouble acccepting the answer that this is normal. Other people I know are energized after a pick me up from lunch!
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i always thought eating was to wake up and get energy???

i get really sleepy after eating too... like to the point where i could pass out. and i get to a stage where everything gets distorted and my brain doesn't function. ..at all. my eyes droop and i feel hungover and as though i haven't slept for days.

in result my work really gets effected after lunch-time.

it just seems absurd having to see a doctor for this...
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