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My PR right now stands at 20:29.

I want to go below 18 minutes by the end of this year. That means speedwork.

So heres my plan.

Saturday - 20 km easy run. No watch, no time, just run. Slow pace.

Sunday - 15 km easy run. Slow pace.

Monday - 7 km easy run during the day. In the evening, 3 x 1 mile runs at around 6 mpm, with 3-5 minutes rest between.

Tuesday - off

Wednesday -Track work. 10 laps on track running fast down one straight, jogging easily the rest of the time. Repeat 10 times. No stops. 15 minutes rest. Followed by a 7km fartlek run. The route is very flat, goes along a river.

Thursday - 7 km easy run early afternoon. Night run, 5 K with stopwatch. My training best now is 22:07, but thats training. I want to get training runs to around 20 minutes and I think that would translate to an 18min race time. My 5K route involves climbing 2 long inclines and one short but prett steep incline.

Friday - off or easy 5 K depending on feeling.

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When I give some recommendations on schedules, I try to give people either one or two 'quality' days, depending on where they're at. Right now, your plan has three, what I'd call, quality days...the mile-reps, the track workout and the timed-5km. What I'd say to do is not push toward getting fried legs, which I'm pretty certain, 3 hard days a week will do. That timed-5km, the day after the track work is never going to become much quality. You'll be pretty fried. I'd switch that to a trail run if you can find one and forget about racing it. I like the idea of the 1-mile reps for a workout. And I like the idea of getting on the track two days later, but why 100-meter sprints on the straights? The bread-and-butter of 5km racers are quarters. Get out there and run full-laps and start with say, 8. Then go to 10, 12 and on up. The rest intervals betweeen don't mean much so jog a half-lap or full or mill around in one spot, recent studies show it doesn't matter. Then if you can get up to 20 quarters, then you'll be in shape for sub-18s.
At least, that's what it took for me when I did it :o
G'luck man.
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There are actually some recent studies that suggest 200 meter repeats (10x) at a little faster than 5K race pace will lower your time quicker than your longer tempo work.

Just a thought...
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200 and 400 repeats are the ticket to faster 5ks's. I'd do one tempo run during the week and one track day featuring 400's and 200's.
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I did my sub 18 min 5K with 1/4 mi. and 1/2 mi. repeats. :shrug:
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Yeah, I've always trained a little longer for 5K races, too.

I'm just saying I read some pretty convincing numbers saying that 200m repeats actually drop 5K times pretty quickly.

Of course, you can prove just about anything with a study!

But evidently, the recovery (from the lactic acid flood after a 200m repeat session) really makes you stronger, longer when you're trying to sustain pace during a 5K.
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200s and hills. severe yuck
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Yes... Yuck!

But the results are nice!
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You should come run the mountians in Utah. 8O That'll put some hair on your chest!
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Lots of good advice. Thanks guys.

Im doing a 10K on saturday, we will see how it goes. Had some scare with my knee over the last two days but I ran an easy 10 km today and it was all fine. Hopefully it was nothing serious.
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200s and hills. severe yuck
Kidtheo, right here are your convincing numbers.
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200s and hills. severe yuck
Kidtheo, right here are your convincing numbers. Sorry, I can't see where the "convincing numbers" are! Are you talking about the lotto numbers while you stand in line at the beer store... I'd love to see them again, because it was a very convincing article.
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You obviously don't know RunAroundSue...... she knows her, uh, stuff!
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There are a huge variety of programs than can work well, especially for a short race like a 5K. I've run under 18 with about every program imaginable. This program can work, but it is a little more unusual than most. That means there may be some room to optimize the training to increase your odds of success.

It does seem odd to me that you have 2 days where you double, but then you take 1 or 2 days off. The distribution of the runs (hard vs. easy days as well as doubles vs. singles vs. off days) seem very odd. I'm guessing this may be due to working around your non-running schedule. If so that is fine, but if you have the flexibility you might want to set a more defined hard / easy schedule.

Currently, you schedule looks like this to me:

Moderate
Easy
Hard
Off
Hard
Hard
Off or Easy

Unlike jrjo I don't have any concerns about 3 hard days, although I am a little concerned about the 2 hard days in a row. This can work for some people, but doesn't work for others. It just depends on what group you are in.

My own preference on the mile repeats is to take a shorter recovery and perhaps do 4 of them right at current 5K pace. With the long recovery and only doing 3, I would expect that you would need to be able to hit these more like 5:40 or better before you could crack 18. 6:00 pace should be where you are at in the middle of the process. If you can hit 6:00 for the mile repeats now, you are probably closer to your goal than your 20:29 indicates.

Finally, improving by 49 seconds per mile in 3 months is not a trivial feat. It depends on your past training history to get to 20:29, and how much room you have for improvement. However, for many individuals that kind of improvment isn't possible in that length of time. I don't have enough information to know for sure in your case, but I think you have to consider if that is a realistic goal or not. I might start by getting under 20, and then setting your sights on sub 19 just to break it into more manageable chucks.
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Well, so far its coming along fine.

I did a 10K race today, extremely hilly. Ive never run such hills despite the fact that Seoul is very hilly.

I did the 10K in 43 minutes with a 2 minute late start because I showed up late :( I suppose that this gives me a projected 21 minute 5K pace but I think that over a much shorter distance I could pace myself a bit faster and on a flat course that should put me close to 20 minutes, perhaps below. I hate hills. I hate going up them and I hate steep descends where I run carefully to avoid injuries.

The 18 minute is ambitious, I know. But Im shooting for it. Aiming for the stars maybe I will hit the moon:)

My training prior to this was basically a lot of cycling in the gym for half a year, then starting in december 2004 runing on a treadmill for 20-30 minutes and doing low intensity 30 minutes on the bike at the gym. For running I basically did it like this: 1 minute at 10km/h, 1 minute at 11, 1 minute at 12, 1 minute at 13 and 1 minute at 14...repeat 4-6 times. 6 days a week. The biking was done to keep my heart rate around 150-160 bpm for 20 minutes. I suppoise this built my aerobic base pretty well.

That was it until I started to run outside in early August 2005.

My training outside has climbed up to the point that currently Ive been doing 60-70 km/week but Im going to take this down to the low 50s to avoid overuse injury. Basically Im forgetting doing a half marathon and Im going to focus on 5 and 10Ks. My goals are still sub 19min 5K and a sub 40 10K before the years end. If that happens, well we can just hope and train.

And the 2 long runs in a row are out. Ill still do a long run of 15K or more on a saturday but Ill follow it up with a short 10K fartlek run on Sunday. 3 days of 10K during the week and 2 days off. that should be 55K a week at different speeds.

Going back to the 20:29, I think its a bit misleading as this was the time that also included some zig zagging through a lot of walkers, about a minute-2 minutes lost before clear road was available.
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