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Hi sleepless in a cast (very clever),

I'm so sorry for the reason, but glad you are here. I did not try water therapy, but at least one person on this site did and said it was helpful. The challenge I wasn't able to overcome was how to protect my foot and navigate to and from the pool.

Today happens to be the one year anniversary of my LisFranc injury. I started PT about 9 weeks post surgery and it helped pull me out of depression, (along with an antidepressant.) I too, initially got emotionally down- partially from the shock and restriction of the injury, the concerned look on doctor's faces (this is a 'significant injury' they'd say) and from reading horror stories online!

I Googled foods loaded with calcium and included some each day. The doctor told me to stop taking antacids and Ibuprofen-something about blocking calcium absorption, if I remember.

My best advice is to be a very compliant patient-rest, ice and elevate religiously. The people who seem to have it the worst are those who try to tough through their injury- walking too soon, for example.

Recovery from this injury IS a slow process, your foot really needs to be carefully babied, but patience pays. I watched a lot of Tv, spent time online and tried to think of myself as getting a well earned rest. I also Googled something like 'exercises with a broken foot' and started doing them while lying-foot elevated to prevent some of the deconditioning.

It DOES get better! You WILL get through this, sleepless! Will be happy to stay in touch.
Em
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Hi Sleepless in a cast,
Sorry to hear of your injury - as you probably know the recovery takes a long time but the results can be good! The best advice I can give is to stick to your surgeon's orders. I did this following a car accident 18months ago that left me with a lisfrance dislocation/fracture which was treated with ORIF, bone grafts and primary fusion of 3 joints (all done in the initial surgery). And I've had a great result from doing exactly as he advised. I do remember the early days though - and 5 days after surgery wasn't much fun, as you know. If it helps though, things do get better! I remember that in the initial weeks after surgery, keeping my foot elevated was a priority (ordered by the surgeon!) so as frustrating as it was I spent most of the time with my foot in the air - I'm guessing your surgeon may have advised this also? I didn't try water therapy but did have regular physiotherapy for around 10months - with more frequent sessions at the start. The physio definitely helped in getting balance and strength back in the leg and foot. Can't remember exactly when I started physio, but I was still in the boot but off crutches (ie. weightbearing in the boot) - your surgeon should be able to advise you of the best time. I didn't follow any particular diet (whatever my husband cooked!) so others may have some good ideas to offer. I felt the depression in the early days also - this improves as you start to make progress (and I found could also be helped by chocolate :)
Hang in there and know that things will improve! All the best for your recovery.
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Thanks to all of the posters to this topic....

I read with interest your experiences, challenges and triumphs!!

IMO, what Lisfranc-ers want, and need, above all, is to find 'normal' people with personal experience of Lisfranc who can give an insight into what lies ahead AND hope that they will eventually get to a position where the injury can be 'coped with'

>>>> gradually I started to find the right people, through blogs, youtube, forums such as this, and decided to pull together a group of such people to make it easier for new Lisfranc-ers to find the RIGHT sort of info

>>> we would love to have you and people like you 'on-board'

the CLUB is on Facebook - search for LISFRANC FRACTURE CLUB - and add your queries and/or advice

- very best regards & LOOK AFTER THAT FOOT!!

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You are so right about what Lisfrancers need! Thank you so much for starting a Facebook page. SteadyHealth is a great help, but I can see how bringing us together on Facebook can also be of tremendous benefit! See you there.
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thanks for your kind words lisfranchope
- and for 'getting' why I started the CLUB
see you there
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Hi Darla. So sorry to hear how low you are feeling. I am now nearly 7 months since my fall in Gambia. A closed reduction op was done there but failed. 4 weeks later I had another op in the UK. All 5 bones and tendon were broken. They were fused and 2 plates, 11 screws and 2 wires were fitted and will remain.
I had all the problems you mentioned..The walking was corrected by PT who was great. I still have some issues with balance but Wii balance games are certainly helping. My foot is still discoloured, a little numb at times & occcasionally i still can strum it.But now I can cope! I'm driving, caring for my grandchildren and gardening. Life is good again!
Listen to all the advise given, don't overdo it (easier said than done!) and just hang in there. Things will improve!
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Hello--I know this is over a year later but I stumbled across your post while doing some research on statistics regarding success after having hardware removed after a Lisfranc injury.

A little more than 2 years ago I suffered from a near fatal car wreck much like yours. 60 mph driving barefoot, brakes locked up...the rest was history. I had one of the worst injuries the orthopedic trauma at Vanderbilt Medical Center had ever seen. It was absolutely terrible, say the least. I had a severe Lisfranc fractures plus all of my metatarsals had been chopped through. I was f***ed.

I had 3 plates and loads of screws put in. It took an entire year to hit what they call the "plateau" of healing and over that time I suffered from terrible pain, the inability to walk barefoot, severe emotional trauma, arthritis, permanent nerve damage, the inability to run....just the works.

It's been two years since then and I've just had the hardware removed due to the screws breaking and surfacing through my foot. I can tell you I no longer feel severe pain (extraordinary pain I havent gotten used to) and I am really excited to see whats over the horizon once all the swelling is gone.

There is light at the end of the tunnel. Injuries such as these take extra care, patience, and persistence though. Arthritis is inevitable. PT and exercise is a MUST. Emotional health and acceptance is key. AND DO NOT GET A FUSION UNLESS YOU HAVE NO OTHER OPTIONS.
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Glad to find this list.

 

I injured my foot 3 years ago - just dropped a piece of wood on it. X-rays showed no fracture so I was told just to rest it and take pain killers. In excrutiating pain all the time. Went back to doctors again and again and eventually told it was arthritis. Got cross and said "how come one day I can walk and run no problem, then I drop something on my foot and next day have such severe arthritis that I can't walk at all?" They then reluctantly refered me to a 'specialist'. Was given cortizone injections that didn't help at all. Now at last after all this time I have seen a different specialist and it has been diagnosed as a lisfranc injury and I go for fusion surgery next month. I've just got to the point where I'm so glad that I am taken seriously after being fobbed off for so long, and that something is going to be done about it, as I have already wasted three years of my life with this.

Trisha in UK

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hi. diagnosed with lisfranc breakeage almost 3 months now. ortho specialist said it needed to be operated on immediately but scared me with talk about slicing nerves n possible foot problems associated after with the surgury. i decided to heal it naturally as i saw a few people in the world have and almost have my foot back to normal, amazing. the power of understanding n application of icing, elevation, massage, footwork, etc applied vs the 'for sure ph d ed' diagnosis. only thing i cant do perfectly yet is a few yoga poses where my foot cant get quite flat yet. walking normal and was walking on it a few days after the break to 'get my foot used to the idea that i was doing it naturally'. i know i am a rare case to do it this way but my faith in the healthcare system where i live has been repeatedly tested over the years and i know how i feel inside n out n my body better than anyone else! hope it hels anyone, namaste!

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You are very fortunate to have healed without cast or surgery! Incredible. Did your break have much 'displacement?' I chose surgery and am glad I did, but of course would have loved to avoid it. Opting to not have surgery is risky, but I am happy for you that your foot is doing well.
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I had my Lisfranc injury on the 23rd of July in my right foot. I tore 3 of the ligaments, hear them ping when they snapped and a small piece of bone got torn off as well. They inserted two screws and told me 6 weeks non weight bearing. I cheated a bit the 3rd week in and started to put some weight for a minute or so 15 times a day. My diet consisted of lots of protein, nuts and meat with fat mostly. (This increases the body's natural repair speed, caveman style :-)

The 5'th week I could walk with a bit of pain and limited mobility because the screws were touching some nerves and made it painful to put my foot in certain positions. Swelling with lots of walking up stairs occurred.

8-10 Weeks the swelling had decreased dramatically and it no longer felt like an electric current was running across the top of my foot.

The 27'th of Oct my screws were removed so the swelling from the op is back again.

According to my Dr the next step is stitches getting removed the 12th of Nov and then a back slab plaster of paris cast for 4-6 weeks.

I'm back on the protein diet to increase the growth of the bones that were penetrated by the screws. Even now with the stitches in I experience no pain, unless I start pulling the skin where the stitches are. I'm feeling very confident on full recovery.

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I am 5 months post fusion surgery. My injury was from volleyball 13 years ago, so needless to say it was a mess to clean up. Surgery went well, NWB for 6 weeks was fine, boot for 4 weeks was no problem I took 2 pain pills during this time. As soon as the surgeon said I could start wearing shoes now comes the pain! Never have I ever had so much pain, did the inserts, compression hose new shoes etc....still lots of pain. So now we are going to remove the hardware. I am praying things are going to get better! From what I have read it helps alot. I sure hope my life is not going to be like this forever! Trying not to lose hope

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Hi have also been reading all these posts and am quite surprised with all the nightmare stories.  I live in Cape Town, South Africa.  I injured myself playing a game similar to basketball (netball) on the 2nd November 2013.  Was nearly misdiagnosed as it is a very difficult injury to find.  Operated on the 12th November.  Non-bearing with crutches and boot until the 19th December.  Started walking and undergoing physio (massage).  Got some exercises to do and carried on with my routine.  To date, my foot is still slightly swollen.  Can walk quite well (a little limp).  The swelling restricts the curved movement of the step especially downstairs.  Feel a bit of pain if not stepping fully on a step.  Doctor has said to start cycling and swimming.  Saw him yesterday and he is bowled over by my healing and my walking.  Hopefully everything will go well from now on.  Obviously I have read about the arthritis so will see when I get there.  But as we get older, I suppose arthritis is going to hit us anyway.  

Thought I would share a good story for a change.  I am quite happy with my improvement and hope that it continues.

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Shazi, my son who was injured playing soccer Oct 2012 had surgery Feb 1st, 2013 screw in and screw out in May is now playing soccer again walks without a limp and does not have swelling. Had a great doctor, everyone told us it would be about a year for complete recovery and I Will say it is pretty true, because when I think about our summer vacation and how he was limping at the beach and then at Christmas we were at the beach again and he
was playing volleyball and ultimate frisbee with full speed it truly is amazing, so there is real hope hang in there !
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Interesting posts. I had my lis franc fracture in 1985 in amuli trauma MVA. The docs said it was a sprain and put a soft cast on me. I couldnt bear weight and my leg was blue from the knee through the foot. Fast forward 30 years. quite deformed. I wear a lidocaine patch daily to keep it as numb as possible. Running or any thing that would put hard pressure impossible. Walking is challenging. conclusion. Do what you can to correct the problem. This is a debilitating injury with a poor prognosis that changes your life style in profound ways 

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