Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

Hi, my son is 13 years old and he is suffering from type 1 diabetes. This disorder appeared after I have divorced with my wife and our soon take it very hard. Soon after that he gets diabetes. He is doing fine right now, with smaller crisis from time to time, but I would like to know how it would affect his future life and what life expectancy for such disorder is.

Loading...

Hi, I am also suffering from type 1 diabetes for a long time. Treatments and medications are greatly improved but such disorders are leaving consequences which are shortening our life potential. Unfortunately type 1 diabetes is shortening life expectancy for about 15 years. Serious heart damages, same as damages on the blood vessels are main reason for this.
Reply

Loading...

Where is the evidence for the most recent comment? It is complete non-sense. MMR has never showed any association with type I diabetes, even with the hysteresis dominant in society these days. The claim that it causes autism (based on original anecdotes of a whopping *11* children) has been discredited on countless occasions; and to put a final boot in the unhelpful comment above, the MMR booster is given within a child's second year of life. Here are just some recent academic papers on the subject.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12612250?ordinalpos=16&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18019187?ordinalpos=3&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17626143?ordinalpos=9&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17928818?ordinalpos=5&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17928818?ordinalpos=5&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum


Fool.
Reply

Loading...

I( have had type 1 diabetis since I was 18 months old and I am now 61 years old. Until recently I have had no significant problems wsith the disbetis. Sometimes it is difficult to inject the insulin when you are out with friends and sometimes you must turn down bar hoping with the alcoholic beverages, raises yout sugar leve.

It does not hampedr affiliation with sports participation providing everyone knows you have it and what to do in an emergency.

I have fished and hunted over most of the 50 states and have enjoyed my life. I have earned a masters degree in state and local taxation with a 3.8 GPA so it does not affect learning. I hAVE BEEN MARRIED TO MY WIFE FOR 33 HAPPY years.

At this point I am having difficulty with memory and not rfemembering things. My vision was fairly good until 2009 at which time a developed a catayartic probelms. The memory is the biggest problem because I don'tnow what to do about it. All the doctors tell me it is related to poor blood flow to the legs, arms and brain which is the reslut of long term diabetis for type 1.

Yet I have not personally found anyone that has had it for 60 years and is still alivde.
Reply

Loading...

I would just like to say that whether one agrees or disagrees with a comment, it is highly unprofessional to resort to the calling of names. If you believe something to be true, you can rest peacefully in its veracity. This commentator's defensiveness leads me to question rather than accept his/her credibility. That said, however, I will read the articles. Thank you for providing an actual reference instead of making unsupported assertions.
Reply

Loading...

I have had diabetes for 41 years. I was diagnosed when i was 2 years of age. I run my sugar pretty low, but have noticed that my memory is really getting bad. Other than that, i have the normal mid life stuff. You learn to modify your life to deal with things. Get regular eye exams and A1c tests. Have your heart checked regularly after age 40. Life is good. Enjoy it!!!!!
Reply

Loading...

I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when I was 7. I am celebrating my 34th b-day this month and I am free of any serious diabetic complications. When I was diagnosed back in the 80's the DR's told my mother not to expect me to live past my 20's. I'm living proof that you can live life with type 1 diabetes just fine.
I was very athletic in sports throughout school including playing on varsity in high school and being a team captain. I didn't let diabetes stop me from doing what I wanted to do. It can be tough especially when you are a child or teen with diabetes. But staying educated about diabetes and regular testing throughout the day is important. Also, look into support groups as well as online support groups. The best diabetic online support group I have found is . It is full of helpful information and very supportive friendly people.
Yes, diabetes has the potential to shorten a persons life expectancy but that doesn't necessarily mean anything. It will shorten ones life more so if you do not learn to control it well. Being out of control with your numbers is what brings on diabetic complications later on. Keeping as close to normal blood sugars as often as possible is the best thing to staying healthy as a diabetic. I just watched a show on Dlife yesterday of a man who had Type 1 diabetes since he was a child and was now 93 years old. Don't let fear rule or control you or your son's life with diabetes. Learn from it and control it instead! I hope this helps!
Also, just a side note to the people who mentioned problems with memory in earlier comments..have your Vitamin D levels checked! I was having serious memory problems recently. My DR tested my Vitamin D and B-12 levels and my Vit D was very low. I am now on one pill a week of a prescription dose of Vitamin D and within 3 months I have seen significant changes in my memory which is much better now. Vitamin D levels are often low in diabetics!
Reply

Loading...

I was 3 when I was diagnosed. I am now a happy, outgoing, very happily married 43 year old female. Other than being heavier than I would like, I am doing very well. Most people do not even know I am diabetic. As a child and in college I played soccer and softball. I excelled in my studies. I have an MS degree and several technical certifications. I am an big time adventurer. I raft. I drive a motorcycle and a quad. I hunt. I fish. I rock climb. I travel. I never say no to fun. I also suffer from memory issues. I have done EXTENSIVE research on the subject and some suggest that low blood sugars over time can lead to memory impairment. I have NO blood flow issues. I do keep my blood sugar between 90 and 100 as much as possible. My A1c is usually around 6.0. Check out Dr. Spiro. email him. He is GREAT!
Reply

Loading...

I have had type one diabetes for 19 years. I am now 27. The last 3 years have been very hard to say the least. I have developed peripheral neuropathy, gastroparesis, and all the other fun things that go with diabetes. I had very good control, until I hit my teens. I am paying for it dearly now. My best advice for your son, is don't punish him because of his diabetes. I would get in trouble everytime my blood sugar was high. My parents would lecture me how I was going to be blind. However, these threats really don't sink in, when you are a child/teen. Soon, diabetes becomes a way to rebel. (Yes, I do realize the stupidity of that now.)
Reply

Loading...

I am very relieved to hear how many of you have lived long lives on Type 1. My spouse was diagnosed with type 1 when she was 30. I am afraid she may not live long.. It went untreated and misdiagnosed for 30 years. My spouse has suffered many impairments becuase of her diabeties... that we now know is type one. I am hoping my spouse has another 30 years of life like some of you mentioned. ?
Reply

Loading...

Hello,

I'm 17 years old and I've had Type 1 Diabetes since I was 9 months old. I too am scared of how short my life could be with Diabetes because I have struggled with my numbers in the past. At one point it wasn't uncommon to see a number in the 400's. My doctor has told me that the window to control my Diabetes is getting smaller and I have taken control from what I see. Sure, I have a couple high numbers here and there but that is inevitable. I'm just scared that my past and how out of control my Diabetes was, if that will have any effect on my body in the future? I want to be able to go to college and live on my own but I am afraid that I could overcompensate for food and go into Diabetic shock while I'm sleeping. I have already done it once and I was lucky enough to be in my home when it happened. What if it happens when I'm living on my own? I know this should be stuff I should discuss with my parents or doctor but I don't want them to see how concerned I am about it. I really could care less about drinking and stuff because I don't even like the taste of alcohol but I want to be able to live a semi-normal adult life. I could really use some advice on what to do.

Thanks!
Reply

Loading...

Just turned 43 diagnosed type 1 20 years ago. Get a good meter and keep testing is my best advice; plug it into a computer or find someone who can. Graph results every few months or with a change in activity (you may be more active when school is out) and adjust your medicine to keep yourself as level as possible. I too have worried about...well not waking up; I found a wrist watch/monitor online that senses perspiration and sets off an alarm -the one time my sugar dropped at night where I passed out in my sleep it made me sweat until the sheets were soaked and it woke my wife who called paramedics :-). The perspiration sensor could give some peace of mind living on your own. Stay active with exercise, it makes insulin much easier to use besides all the other health benefits. I play over 40 soccer and it helps my sugar level stay down and lets me take less insulin. If you ever get complacent, remember your eyes and your who-ha depend on your keeping your levels good and you may need one of them some day. :-D
Reply

Loading...

Thanks to all for sharing your stories. I am sitting at my computer and I just start to cry. My little sister was diagnosed with Type 1 last year when she was 17 years old. I guess it never really hit me how serious of an illness it is. She has struggled with her numbers, this past week her meter, which goes somewhere above 500 only says high. She is young and doesn't see the long term consequences of the disease. As an older sister (I am 29) is there anything I can do to help her. I don't want to lose my only sister. :'(
Reply

Loading...

Hi
Like others, I have had diabetes for quite some time. I was diagnosed 42 years ago when I was 12. Also, my doctors may not like me saying this, but I have been far from perfect with regard to diet. I really believe that there is much more trouble with low blood sugar than high... of course, perfectly in between is probably better, but I have decided not to spend my whole life worrying about exact blood sugar levels. On the other hand, I have been very hard core about exercise. I have bicycled as much as 200 miles in a day, have climbed mountains all over the US and in Nepal, and currently run most days. I ski (downhill and X-country), hike, and have done whitewater - even jumped out of a perfectly good airplane - on purpose! :-) You CAN lead a perfectly normal life with this disease - I am married, have 2 great daughters, graduated from MIT as an undergrad and then graduate school at the University of Colorado, and have had some pretty interesting (but high stress) jobs at Google, AOL, some startups, etc.

I have always noticed that exercise has a moderating effect on diabetes, I would recommend anyone with it make sure they establish a regular exercise program, and really understand how this changes blood sugar. You must moderate your insulin - and/or have food available - when you exercise, to avoid low blood sugar issues, but I strongly believe that this is what got me to 42 years with diabetes, and kept me happy as well.

After 42 years, I have only seen real impact in the last 1-2. I have lightweight retinopathy (was laser treated last summer and am relatively good now), have some neuropathy, my kidneys are starting to see some degradation (not bad though). I have had some memory issues, especially recently, which I ascribe to low blood sugar incidents. I have heart issues that may or may not be diabetes related, but am on top of them.

I always thought I would die by 25, then 35, then 45. Now I think I stand a good chance at 75, and very good chance at 65. I sure can't ask for more.
Reply

Loading...

I'd like to thank every single person that has posted on this topic. I see the last posted was months ago. But,

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 3 years ago when I was 12, I am now 15. I went to google and google'd my life expectancy, and this popped up. I took a look and read all of these responses, and I am relieved and quite scared still to say the least. As of late, I have not been keeping very good track of my blood counts, (I'm Canadian, and we use a different scale. My regular level is around 15.0, and your "supposed" to be around 4-7. Anywere under 4 is considered a low.) I was just wondering, if anyone is still around, if there is a way to combat this memory loss, as almost everyone has said it. And as I said, I honestly have had around a year of mistreatment, and after reading this today I will be sure to stay on top of it, but I am wondering will there be any of these long term consequences because of this recent mis-treatment?
Reply

Loading...