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I'm a nurse at a local hospital and I have been exposed to patients contaminated with Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, I'm afraid that I could be carrying the bacteria although I have been tested and the test came out negative. Recently I found out that I'm pregnant. I'm afraid of the possible infection with MRSA and the consequences that it could leave on my child. Are there any precautions that I can take about this?

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You have every reason to be afraid, the fact that you have been exposed to MRSA and that the test on the MRSA came out negative doesn’t mean that you are still not the carrier. These tests aren’t perfect and a certain number of bacteria can slip through without being detected. Just to be sure you should take these tests again, and during the duration of your pregnancy you should stay away from possible recontamination, maybe even take a few moths off the work since the nature of your work puts you in the immediate danger. You should also consider taking an antibiotic like muciprocin which should prevent the infection of your respiratory organs with MRSA and prevent any possible problems that may arise from the potential infection. For further information and possible treatment options you should consult your physician.
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I have been tested positve for mrsa and i am 6 months pregnant, how can this affect my unborn child. I am being treated with meds.
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Since you don't actually have a MRSA infection right now, but you're at a higher risk of contracting one, the precaution you can take is to be extra careful with personal hygiene. Wear gloves, but always wash your hands for a long time and properly after any contact with any possible source of the infection. 

As for pregnancy and staph, the questions you'll have is, can a MRSA staph infection cause miscarriage and can it cause birth defects, as well as, can it be passed onto your baby? The first two, it's a negative answer. It can be passed on though, but that is rare. 

For now, just keep taking preventative measures and you might not even get it. 

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