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Has anyone heard of the new surgery for Morton's Neuroma called KobyGard System or MIND--minimally invasive surgery? After hearing all the horror stories about the traditional types of surgery, I did a lot of research to find something new. I'm having a difficult time finding a doctor in N.C. who does this. Has anyone out there heard of this surgery or has had it done???

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Rena911 – Did you ever get treatment for your neuroma? After about 6 months of other treatments (injections and various orthotics/padding), I had decompression surgery in March 2007. I was told I’d be “back in high heels” after 3 weeks (actually, I don’t wear high heels) and chose MIND (aka EDIN – Endoscopic Decompression of the Intermetatarsal Nerve) surgery because I thought it would be less risky than the traditional surgery, where they remove a piece of the nerve. With EDIN, they do not remove the compressed nerve, they take pressure off of the nerve by releasing the ligaments surrounding it. This is similar to the treatment they do for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Some podiatrists refer to Morton's Neuroma as "CTS of the foot." I'm told that it is most effective in patients who have had symptoms for less than 3 years. Three months after the surgery, my foot was still quite swollen, I was limping badly, and had much more pain than before the surgery. The surgeon gave me more injections (cortisone?) and told me to come back in another month. At the 4 month mark (still having more pain & symptoms than before the surgery), the surgeon bluntly announced that the first surgery didn’t work and “we” should just go in again and remove the affected piece of nerve. I told him I had to think about that. I went to another podiatrist and after 6 more months of treatment (many injections, orthotics/padding, but no more surgery), I am still looking for pain relief. Right now, I am told to “avoid walking” until the neuroma (also called neuritis and I’m told I also have capsulitis) is “fixed.”

I don’t mean to depress you, or discourage you from decompression surgery, which I’m told is successful about 90% of the time, I’m just giving you my story. It didn’t work for me, and left me worse than I was before the surgery. I would exhaust all other options before trying surgery. Many people find relief from the traditional or newer surgery; I’m still searching. Don’t give up – keep trying till you find something that relieves your pain.
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I had nerve decompression surgery on Jan 8, 2009. I did not choose the endoscopic route but rather the top of the foot. This method allowed the Dr to truly see how enlarged the morton's neuroma was and to cut the ligaments trapping the nerve. I stayed off my feet for 3 days, iced 20 min every hr for 3 days, took pain pills as needed, and still taking an anti-inflammatory. Foot is no longer swollen, still slightly bruised, and could wear regular shoes except they hurt so still wearing the surgery walking shoe. Dr said healing will take 6 weeks and won't know for 6 months whether surgery was successful. I've been very pleased with my Dr, his explanations, treatment and overall advice. I'd do this again, if needed. However, I am frustrated at the apparent slowness of healing. That is, I tire easily, I want to be out snowshoeing, skiing, running, hiking, etc but can't even walk around a mall at this point. I think the key to remember is that healing takes time. Because of advanced technologies, reduced hospital stays, outpatient surgeries (thanks to insurance companies) we expect to return to our former lives that much quicker.
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There is a Toronto-based podiatry clinic that does the MIND decompression operation. See h , and the instrumentation typically used is produced by a company named Koby one
They claim that the patient can immediately walk after the procedure. If you search on "podiatry MIND" and the name of the city where you live, perhaps you can locate a podiatrist who has experience with this technique. I suspect experience performing of these operations prevents mistakes and collateral damage as a surgical complication.
Good luck!

***edited by moderator*** web addresses not allowed
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I was just told by the doctor that he wants to perform surgery. I have been treated with cortizone, alcohol and orthodics for 7 years. It is at the point I hurt so darn bad now. These posts are scarying me. I'm 42 active, run several miles a day (can't do more than 3 or 4 miles and have to deal with imense burning and pain everyday afterwards now)
What is recommended, going through the top or the bottom of the foot and how bad does the scarring look after the surgery? What has been the recovery times for folks?
I see there is a doctor (check out Dr. Mark Katz) on you tube that does cyro surgery and having good success. He doesn't take my insurance so if I go that route it will cost me out of pocket $1500 to $2500. Is that worth a try?
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I had surgery January 6th stayed off my foot for 6 days and used lots of ice. It took quite a few month while before I could be really be active, walking, golfing, biking and I continue with those activities even though I had an additional cortisone shot and wore orthotics and changed my shoes. It has been 7 months and I am tired of the pain and will be going back for more surgery. For the past 10th months all that has managed to happen with the pain is that it is duller or I have more tolerance. I have no answers.
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I had my surgery on 4/16/10. This was after about 3years of trying EVERYTHING else from injections to orthodics to physical therapy. Thr pain just kept on returning!! I was active and had actually trained for a bodybuilding show about 2 years ago. So when the neuroma came back again, I got soooooo frustrsated. Like many of you I was told the recovery time would be much quicker than what its turning out to be. I was pretty much on bed rest for the first 2 weeks and this being the third week, my feet are still quite swollen and very bruised. I am in regualr shoe but I can only fit my New Balance which I purchased a size too big and extra wide because of the neuroma (no high heels for me...or even flats for that matter) as far as activity, I can do daily activities like cooking , driving, and minimal walking but now the pain takes over in a much shorter amount of time. Before I could be busy on my feet, walk my dogs, etc and get things done, but i'd definitely deal with the pain at the end of the day. Now I can only stay on my feet for a bout 15 to 20 minutes before itt get unbarable. Its still early so I'm not sure if this pain is due to the swelling or if the procedure didnlt work. We'll see in a few months. But I must say this is a very annoying condition to have, even if you are very active ;(
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I am recovering my second morton's neuroma (I've had one on each foot) and my first one was a complete success my surgeon went in through the top of the foot and removed the whole nerve, my recovery took about 6weeks to walk without the shoe and was a painful recovery at home. The left foot is now 99% normal and very rarely do I ever experience any pain which is because its not the same as nature intended. I was running, cycling and weightlifting without any problems after about 2months I just took it slowly.

The second foot (right) was done on the 14th May 2010 and before surgery I couldn't drive, walk without crutches and was in chronic pain 24/7 this resulted in me being signed off of work from Oct 09 to present. I woke up from the operation in less pain than when I went in and could move better than before. My surgeon was very shocked at the immediate improvement and told me that he had never removed one as big as mine.

A huge point to remember on these boards is the people who never have any problems very rarely come on here and share the experience so the operation can seem like it doesn't work. I could not of been happier to get the operation because of my successful experience and so far the recovery is getting better each day.
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Hi, I am post op morton's neuroma 3 days, the nerve was removed, I am free from pain and walking well, the op was though the top of my foot. There is no swelling and just one small bruise under my foot. I can put my weight on it normally already and I am not small!!I can wiggle my toes as usual and it feels normal for the first time is 3 years, its great. I am wearing normal slippers and have taken the dog out for a short walk today. :-D :-D I hope this is a help to anyone thinking of having the op. Maybe I am just lucky but that is not the usual case with me. I have had 3 hip replacements in 3 years and they are still not that stable. But this seems super, at the moment.
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Ok, I'm back 3 months post surgery and still in pain. I had the ligament release surgery done in both feet. The left foot has healed for themost part but the right foot is still inflammed, swollen and tender. I still can't curl my toes completely. I am also noticing that in addition to the post surgery pain, I am still experiencing pre-surgery neuroma pain. Walking or standing for more than 20 min is a no no!! I stay with a bottle of extra strength rapid release tylenol!



The doctor continues to say give it time but geez, how much MORE time. I was expecting 2weeks, and no more than a month!! And for me to still have pain as if no surgery was done in the first place, very frustrating. I took it upon my self to see a chiropractor who did an electrical stimulation treatment on me. After just 1 treatment the swelling went down considerably! So we'll see how these treatments work. I'm also taking some natural anti-inflammatory supplements (bromelain, enzymes, magnesium, etc). I pray this works, I'm too young to be worried about my feet and not being active like I want to be!



I will definetly keep posting updates. Good luck to everyone
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I had surgery in March of 2010. The recovery was alot longer than they had originally told me. The first week was awful. I had regretted having this for that first week. Then I seen some improvment. The worst thing about this is they cut through the nerves and I could not stand for even a blanket to rub my foot due to the tingling I had. I still have it. I hate it. The lump on the bottom of my foot went down. For the first 3 months I thought I had made a huge mistake because i could feel my scar. It felt as if I was walking with a rock in my shoe. I cracked a bone in my foot walking on the side of it, avoiding walking flat footed. Now the feeling has subsided. My question is, does anyone still have bruising on the top of the toes and foot where the neuroma was since your surgery? I have not went back to the doctor, as i should and I plan on making an appt. soon because I don't think its normal after all these months to have bruising to continually stay at the top of the foot. Please let me know your take on this and if you are experiencing similar issues.
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For anyone who is thinking of having this op, it may seem like a minor day case op, but in reality the recovery can take months. I firstly had my operation done in 2007, on the right foot. As a result, I had pain, which turned out to be that the nerve had stuck to the bone, which the foot surgeon discovered on opening up my foot for the second time in 2008. Both operations were performed from the plantar aspect of the foot. The second time the scar tissue was removed, which unfortunately immediately cam back and was painful to walk on.
My GP suggested I walk on it to soften it up, which I did, but was in a lot of twinging pain afterwards. After two years of this, and also trying gabapentin, to see if the nerves would desesenitize, I went to see another surgeon privately, and this time the operation was done from the top of the foot. That was 4 weeks ago. I had developed a traumatic neuroma which was entangled in scar tissue. Now the top wound has healed nicely, but some pricking at bottom of scar. Part of my foot feels numb as if someone has stuffed a load of cotton wool in it! It is stiff in the mornings, and there is another lump of scar tissue under the foot. However, I have put my trainers on and gone for a walk this morning. It was aching where the lump is, but the sharp pain has subsided. If it wasn't for the scarring would feel a lot better. I massage the foot twice daily and put a stip of silicone dressing to soften the scar. Now I notice that the left foot has started playing up, which reminds me why I had the right one done and makes me realise that the aching, numbness etc is preferable to sharp pain Will just have to decide what to do about the left one now.
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I had the same surgery to decompress the nerve....my toes are still separated (sullivan sign) the pain is still there only now I also get shooting pains in my arch. I was told that I would be up and in a shoe within ten days. And all better in 3-6 weeks. I was able to get into an extra wide sneaker. But Still cannot wear heels, shoes, or go barefoot. i have been taping my toes together to try to encourage the sullivan sign to go away, I don;t think it will work. I have been doing this for three months. Still cannot run, walk, or eliptical.......without pain. The dr said I could have the more invasive surgery through the bottom of my foot and remove the entire nerve, bu I am too scared now to try. he said I would lose feeling in my toes.....I am getting a second opinion.
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I had left foot decompression between my 3rd and 4th toes (the tiny incision is between the toes, not on the top or bottom of my foot) in April 2012. They told me it would be a good 6 months before I was totally back to normal, but I was walking in the boot and going to PT right away. The electric shock, numbness and pain from the neuroma disappeared right away. About 5 months after surgery I started to experience swelling, muscle paralysis of the toes and moderate pain on the top of my foot where the ligament was cut. The pain radiates down the outside of my foot and up to my ankle. It is uncomfortable but not debilitating. It doesn't matter what shoes I wear ( or none) or what I am doing. It is nowhere near the pain or discomfort that I felt pre-decompression. I went back to my doc and he did an mri and found that despite the PT I have developed a significant amount of scar tissue that is hitting the nerve and causing all of this. Has anyone else experienced this? My doc also told me that very recently he has started injecting stem cells into the surgical area of the decompression to prevent the scar tissue from forming with about 90% success. Unfortunately, he started doing this a few months after my surgery. I go back tomorrow to talk about how to proceed - whether to try just the injections of stem cells to try to dissolve the scar tissue or have another surgery to remove it, at which time he will do the injection as well. I have no idea what the recovery is, whether I'll be back in a boot, for how long, or have to do PT again. Thankfully, I have hit my out of pocket max for the year so I am not worried about expense. I just want to know if there are other options out there, if anyone has been through this, and if anyone has heard anything about this use of stem cells. I should also add that I do really like my doc and trust him, and that given the choice, I'd still do the decompression surgery again.
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I've had a problem with morton's neuroma in both feet for almost two years now.  I have researched cryosurgery and it looks like a great alternative to the traditional surgery.  Today, I saw a podiatrist in Spartanburg who performs cryosurgery.  I'm scheduled for surgery on Tuesday (11/20/12).  I'll let you know how it goes.  Debbie in western NC 

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