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Hi there,

Hopefully I won't end up with a double-post: I tried to do one yesterday and I still don't see it here. I just have a couple of quick questions about quitting smoking. I've smoked regularly for about 20-21 years, anywhere from a pack a day for about 10 years to 5 or 6 for about 7 years (with the rest of the years somewhere in between). I quit twice, once for each pregnancy. Now I've quit again... it's day 13 and I am going through the usual SOB*, anxiety, burning lungs, restless legs, etc.

1. Why did I never cough up tar when I quit while pregnant?
2. Is it normal to have just little brown flecks in my sputum or should I be seeing more?
3. Am I any better off for having quit 2x in the last 5 years and cut my smoking down to just a few a day? Did my lungs improve or just not get worse as fast as they were getting when I smoked a pack a day?
4. Do "Lung Detox" programs actually work?

Anyway, if anybody could shed any light on that for me, I'd really appreciate it.

*No Chantix, for anyone who wonders if there is a link between SOB and the drug

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Oh, and one more question:

1. Can I expect to feel better, even when I was only smoking between 0 and 5 cigarettes a day? A lot of people say they felt tons better (eventually) after giving up 1-2 pack a day habits. Will I still feel better after quitting a small amount?
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My father smoked for 50 years, and then one day just decided to quit. His doctor said that it is in your genetics and how much you smoked a day on how your lungs would be effected. The phlem you cough up is not actually tar (according to a doctor), it is from lung inflammation and mild broncial infection due to smoking. The chemicals in cigarettes keep the lungs from being able to filter and expel impurity so when you quit (and your lungs try to rehab), you will have inflammation or infection which will cause the lungs to create more mucus. As far as cutting back on cigarettes over the years, it is better but your lungs can't start to heal until you quit all together. The time you were pregnant may have helped give your lungs some time off though. Lung "detox" programs do not work.
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Hi there,
I agree with redgirl. I think its different from each individual. Since Ive quit smoking 3 months ago. I havent had a persistent cough/phlegm like so many others have. Ive maybe had to cough 3 times. it was small cough - more of a clearing throat type. But a friend of mine didnt start coughing up phlegm till her 6 month in. You need to fully quit for your body to recover not just cutting down. Then your body will then start recovering and adapt to a smoke free environment. This is when your body starts going crazy and in a cellular level is recovering - even your nerves need to recover - some people get really bad reactions some people very mild and can last for months - not weeks like those dumb pamphlets say.

Good Luck
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