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Hey everyone,

I hope that someone will be able to tell me something more about this matter since I don't know much and it is very important to me.

My step mom has diabetes and she just recently discovered that she has silent ischemia, I don't even know how but the point is that she has this condition. Now, I don't know much about it, I know that it doesn't differ from normal ischemia a lot, except in the fact that when you have silent ischemia, you don't really feel any pain.

Does anyone know something about silent ischemia in people with diabetes?

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Hey Bee,

First of all, your step mom has diabetes, which is one of the major risk factors for getting silent ischemia, or normal ischemia as well. The treatment only differs in the fact that you need to pay extra attention to your diabetes if you have ischemia, I'm guessing that she did not take proper care of herself since she got this condition, and I could bet that she got it because of her diabetes. 

Heart muscle disease (cardiomyopathy) caused by silent ischemia is among the more common causes of heart failure in the United States, so this can be pretty dangerous.

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Hi guys,

It is pretty much connected with diabetes, this ischemia thing, and it takes extra effort and time to treat it if you have both of these conditions.

I understand why you said that you don't know how did she figure out that she has ischemia, even harder since she has silent ischemia, but I'm guessing that you know that silent ischemia has no symptoms whatsoever.

The treatment options include lifestyle changes, like quitting smoking, stopping to drink alcohol, exercising regularly, controlling your diabetes, cholesterol and high blood pressure, and adopting healthy eating habits. This shouldn't be so hard after all.
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Hey guys,

You didn't tell me exactly how dangerous can this be Stradivarius, and now this is the most important thing that I want to know about when it comes to silent ischemia in people with diabetes, how dangerous can it be? Since Jane wrote that it should be only treated with lifestyle changes, I'm assuming that it is not so dangerous after all, but I need someone to confirm that to me.

Are there maybe some other treatment options, in case that someone's silent ischemia is severe, can that happen? Does it matter at what time did you find out that you have it?

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Sorry for not clearing that out right away, Bee. Yes, it can be dangerous, like I already mentioned, it can indirectly lead to heart failure, which can cause death.

Usually, the doctors will always recommend to try with lifestyle changes first, the ones that Jane wrote, if that doesn't work out, they will prescribe some medications to this person. These medications include aspirin, anticoagulants, or other blood-thinning agents to prevent blood clots from forming. If that doesn't help, then the only option is surgery. These are called percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI), and they include balloon angioplasty, coronary artery bypass surgery, or a similar procedure.

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Good day there. Well, generally Ischemia is a condition in which the blood flow (and thus oxygen) is restricted or reduced in a part of the body. Cardiac ischemia is the name for decreased blood flow and oxygen to the heart muscle. It should be treated in any case, and it should be treated and well monitored in patients with diabetes. It is now known that angina pectoris may be a poor indicator for myocardial ischemia, particularly in patients with diabetes. The recognition of diabetic patients with asymptomatic and yet significant CAD remains difficult. In diabetic patients poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for clinicians.
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Hello there guys. Well, just like you already probably know, this can be extremely dangerous if you let it untreated. Just like any other disease. There is a connection between silent ischemia and diabetes and remember that any heart issue can have huge problems in people who are dealing with some other diseases such as diabetes.  So, silent ischemia is definitely one of the biggest risk for getting diabetes. But in this case I really don't know what can I say to help you, how can I help you at all. I don't know which treatment is the best and which one has only a bit of side - effects. 

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Hey there.

This is a heart failure and it can be dangerous. Silent or asymptomatic myocardial ischemia is the most common manifestation of coronary heart disease and it is dangerous by itself as well. So, it is more dangerous for the people who are dealing with diabetes. Now, among patients with some heart failures or some other failures such as diabetes, the presence of silent ischemic episodes detected during daily life by ambulatory ECG (Holter) monitoring is predictive of an adverse clinical outcome, as evidenced by an increased risk of coronary events and cardiac death. So, whatever it is it should be treated.

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