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My best friend’s daughter was born with congenital muscular torticollis. Her neck is stiff and rotated on her left side and can’t be moved on the other. What is there to know about this? Is it some sort of genetic anomaly and can it be fully resolved. They have been shown certain stretching exercises and I was wondering if they help in any way. What are the odds of curing this disorder? Thanks

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Congenital muscular torticollis means that a sternocleidomastoid muscle on one side of the baby’s neck became tighter and is pulling the head and neck to that side. One theory suggests that blood flow to the affected muscle is reduced during vaginal birth and that this reduced flow had caused some damage. However, there were cases in which babies that were born by C-section also developed this condition. Then it is thought to be caused before the birth. However, torticollis can be caused by congenital abnormalities of the cervical spine, so x-rays are usually performed at birth. Congenital torticollis is not painful for the child but there is also acquired toticollis that unables children to move their heads due to severe pain. Those stretching exercises should help to improve the condition but if they don’t, a child needs to be taken to a physical therapist. If the condition doesn’t improve within 1,5 years, a surgery may be needed to lengthen the affected muscle. If the condition is not resolved in one year time, it may lead to facial deformity.
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My 5 year old daughter had been diagnosed and prognosed with torticolis, responded well to therapy, and then was diagnosed with DVD in the left eye. After two surgeries that have failed, she is going to have another surgery. I really think the "unusual" third surgery will not work, considering, the second surgery is suppose to fix the problem. What do I have to look forward to if this third surgery does not work?
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