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Good day everyone. While I am looking for some answers and some helpful advice I was surfing online and I accidentally found this site. I asked this question so many times at so many sites, but I didn’t get any good answer. Here is what I want to know. My sister Allyssa called me and she told me that doctors think that she is having Brugada syndrome. I have no idea what this is. I just want to know is it dangerous? Can you tell me what are treatment options for Brugada syndrome? So far she didn’t have any heart problems.

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Hey there Vanya.

Well, Brugada syndrome is a genetic disease that is followed by abnormal CG findings and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. So many people who have this syndrome are undiagnosed because the condition often doesn’t cause any noticeable symptoms. The treatment depends on the case – is it in the higher or lower risk. For example, for high risk individuals treatment may include an implantable cardioverter – defibrillator. This is a very small device that continuously monitors the heart rhythms. It tracks your heart rhythms and it will help you to find out do you have any abnormalities in your heart rate.

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Unfortunately I know a few things about this syndrome. As far as I know, the only treatment that is known to be effective is implantation of an automatic ICD which stands for implantable cardiac defibrillator. I’ve heard about some other treatments too, but at the time one of my family members was dealing with it, it was the only treatment that has been proven to be effective.

There are some pharmacologic therapies but none of them have been proven to reduce the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias or sudden death.

And unfortunately yes, it can be very dangerous. How old is your sister?

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That is the only treatment I am familiar with. When my friend went to the doctor and was diagnosed with this syndrome, it was a real challenge for the doctor how to treat him.

The thing is, patients with Brugada syndrome who have a history of cardiac arrest are of course always treated with an ICD. They need to be.

But on the other hand, patients which don’t show any symptoms and don’t have family history of sudden cardiac death don’t need ICD because they can be managed differently.

Here doctors won’t do the ICD implantation because it is not recommended.

 Patients with intermediate clinical characteristics such as my friend are the hardest to work with.

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I have read somewhere that in theory, drugs that counteract the ionic current imbalance in patients with Brugada syndrome, should help in treating this. I’m not sure why don’t they use them then. They’ve probably tried and had no results. Or maybe the ICD implantation showed much better results.

That’s strange cause quinidine for example blocks the calcium-independent transient outward potassium current and it has been shown to normalize the ECG pattern in people who have this syndrome.

Although I’ve also read somewhere that quinidine blocks sodium (Na) currents too, so that’s not good. It says that it could have contrary effects.

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Good day there guys.

There are several types of Brugada syndrome. It is a condition that causes an abnormal heart rhythm in the heart’s lower chambers and this irregular heartbeat can cause fainting and it can lead to sudden cardiac death. So, it is serious. It is a rare disease that is inherited from at least one parent. It is caused by genetic mutation.

About the treatment, there are several options.

I know that mostly ICD is used for patients with a definitive diagnosis and symptoms, but sometimes this is not good for every patient.

Doctor will determine it.

Good luck. 

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I have heard of Brugada syndrome. It is one of those inherited arrhythmia disorders. Along with long and short QT syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia.
I don’t know how common is Brugada but I don’t know a single person suffering from any of these.
It’s been said that it is more common in men than in women. And it is interesting that the majority of affected people are Asian. I wonder what leads to that.
I’ve heard that one of the triggers of arrhythmia in Brugada patients is the use of cocaine and alcohol.
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Hi.

My teacher from Senior high has Brugada syndrome. I remember when my friend told me about this I didn’t know what exactly this can be. I found out as well that not every Brugada patient is an appropriate candidate for an ICD. The decision to implant device of this type can depend on a lot of different factors, such as genetic testing results, some other cardiac problems, etc. There are a several doctors that recommend and suggest that patients with this syndrome without any prior cardiac arrest seem to be in the lower risk for long term occurrence of deadly ventricular arrhythmias.

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Hello all.

 

Brugada syndrome is uncommon but very serious heart condition. It can result by abnormal heart beating, fast heart rates, but some people just don’t have symptoms at all. But if you have symptoms you can have blackouts, seizures and sometimes heart palpitations.  I have to disagree with some of you because the only proven and effective treatment for this syndrome is having an implantable cardiac defibrillator fitted. ICD is very similar to peacemaker and it senses your heart is beating at the potentially dangerous abnormal rate. This is the only way to find out what treatment is the best.

Some people are making a mistake because they do believe that ICD will prevent the arrhythmia but it can’t prevent it. But it can treat it.

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