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i've recently developed a series of blisters/open sores which have spread throughout the pubic hair near my vagina. the sores are very itchy and secrete a yellow fluid which appears to be turning into a crusty scab. the sores surround hair follicles, which lead me to believe this started out as itchy razor burn which i must have scratched at while sleeping, then leading to infection. there are no bugs or knits, i've already looked..also the sores have not infected any part of the membrane or vaginal lips. they are very painful and i would greatly appreciate any advice.

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What you just described sounds exactly what happened to me recently. Have you figures out what it was?
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The same thing has been happening to me for awhile now and my Doc said it is some form of a cysts. The ithcing is the worst part of it. Have you found out what caused it or what to use to treat the insane itching?
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I get that sometimes and I go out and get jock itch cream and put on there and that usually takes it away.
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hun, it sounds like vaginal warts. maybe herpes? have you been sexually active or had unprotected sex or even recieved oral? i would consult your gynocologist. the best thing to do would be to have it looked at and treat it accordingly. hope that helps!
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Yea it sounds like a cyst, I usually just drain mine by popping them with a neddle or put a hot rag on it..it'll make it easier to pop
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I have one too and its painful and its been about 3 days wat can we do about it
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Superficial folliculitis, which includes types that affect the upper part of the hair follicle, may cause:

Clusters of small red bumps that develop around hair follicles
Pus-filled blisters that break open and crust over
Red and inflamed skin
Itchiness or tenderness
Deep folliculitis starts deeper in the skin surrounding the hair follicle and affects the entire hair follicle. Signs and symptoms include:

A large swollen bump or mass
Pus-filled blisters that break open and crust over
Pain
Possible scars once the infection clears
Superficial folliculitis
Superficial forms of folliculitis include:

Staphylococcal folliculitis. This common type is marked by itchy, white, pus-filled bumps that can occur anywhere on your body where hair follicles are present. When it affects a man's beard area, it's called barber's itch. It occurs when hair follicles become infected with Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria. Although staph bacteria live on your skin all the time, they generally cause problems only when they enter your body through a cut or other wound. This can occur through shaving, scratching or with an injury to the skin.
Pseudomonas folliculitis (hot tub folliculitis). The pseudomonas bacteria that cause this form of folliculitis thrive in a wide range of environments, including hot tubs whose chlorine and pH levels aren't well regulated. Within eight hours to five days of exposure to the bacteria, a rash of red, round, itchy bumps will appear that later may develop into small pus-filled blisters (pustules). The rash is likely to be worse in areas where your swimsuit holds contaminated water against your skin.
Tinea barbae. Caused by a fungus rather than a bacterium, this type of folliculitis develops in the beard area in men, causing itchy, white bumps. The surrounding skin also may become reddened. A more serious, inflammatory form of the infection appears as pus-filled nodules that eventually form a crust and that may occur along with swollen lymph nodes and fever.
Pseudofolliculitis barbae. An inflammation of the hair follicles in the beard area, pseudofolliculitis barbae affects men when shaved hairs curve back into the skin. This leads to inflammation and, sometimes, to dark raised scars (keloid scars) on the face and neck.
Pityrosporum folliculitis. Especially common in teens and adult men, pityrosporum folliculitis produces chronic, red, itchy pustules on the back and chest and sometimes on the neck, shoulders, upper arms and face. It's caused by the yeast-like fungus.
Herpetic folliculitis. Shaving through a cold sore — a small, fluid-filled blister caused by the herpes simplex virus — can sometimes spread the herpes infection to neighboring hair follicles.
Deep folliculitis
Types of deep folliculitis include:

Gram-negative folliculitis. This sometimes develops if you're receiving long-term antibiotic treatment for acne. Antibiotics alter the normal balance of bacteria in the nose, leading to an overgrowth of harmful organisms (gram-negative bacteria). In most people, this doesn't cause problems, and the flora in the nose returns to normal once antibiotics are stopped. In a few people, however, gram-negative bacteria spread and cause new, sometimes-severe acne lesions.
Boils and carbuncles. These occur when hair follicles become deeply infected with staph bacteria. A boil usually appears suddenly as a painful pink or red bump. The surrounding skin also may be red and swollen. The bump then fills with pus and grows larger and more painful before it finally ruptures and drains. Small boils usually heal without scarring, but a large boil may leave a scar. A carbuncle is a cluster of boils that often occurs on the back of the neck, shoulders, back or thighs. Carbuncles cause a deeper and more severe infection than does a single boil. As a result, they develop and heal more slowly and are likely to leave scars.
Eosinophilic folliculitis. Seen primarily in those with HIV, this type of folliculitis is characterized by recurring patches of inflamed, pus-filled sores, primarily on the face and sometimes on the back or upper arms. The sores usually spread, may itch intensely and often leave areas of darker than normal skin (hyperpigmentation) when they heal. The exact cause of eosinophilic folliculitis isn't known, although it may involve the same yeast-like fungus responsible for pityrosporum folliculitis.
When to see a doctor
Mild cases of folliculitis often clear up without any treatment. But if the infection doesn't improve despite home care, appears to spread or recurs often, call your doctor or a dermatologist. You may need antibiotics or antifungal medications to help control the problem
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Thanks to the last reply. It is mostly caused from shaving, and ingrown hairs getting infected. It's nothing to worry about unless it's spreading.,
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Hi,
I was having a strong itch(due to the menstrual pad) and while scratching I probably pulled on one hair. Now this follicle got infected and the surrounding area developed a bump. In the bump is some puss. I applied hot rag and some pus came out on pressing. It is very painful but the infection is superficial for sure. Do I need to see the doctor immediately.
BTW I do not have any itch now but this pain is killing.
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I have also aquired some itchy and sore blisters. However they do not burn when i'm using the bathroom, washing, or etc. I know for sure that these are not sexually transmitted. I have asked my doctor and read online that it is very common for women to get breakouts of blisters, and sores. Some are red, some are clear, some are filled with puss, other's blood. Ether or if they go away withing a few day's it's nothing you should worry about. My doctory recommeded sitting in a warm bath and letting them burst on their own. These can be caused by a bacterial infection, alergic reaction, or let's say your jeans are too tight, any friction may also cause them. Do not touch them, do not mess with them, this will only inflame them. If you are worried about infection dab some Neosporin on them. Also be sure to change your underwear, tampoons, and pads often.
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I had this once before...believe it or not, it sounds like herpes. I was with the same, clean partner for over a year. I had to get a rabies vaccine for vet school and that shot really brings your immune system down low. I happened to have sex the night that I got my shot and then started experiencing these tiny, itchy, almost razor burn like blisters. I went to the ER and got diagnosed that it was herpes, but not genital herpes. It was the kind of herpes you get when you get cold sores around your mouth. Apparently if your partner has ever had a cold sore, then they have this type of herpes, which doesn't affect your sex life, unless your body is trying to kill off something else, like it was trying to do to my rabies vaccine. Needless to say, I was put on antibiotics, and a while later, I was back to normal and never had it sense and was told i'll most likely never have it again.
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I have the exact same thing? should i go see a doctor? have you figured out what it is?
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wow all this info is scary for mee, i'm only sixteen and i've never been sexually active. Who should I believe, how could I have herpes since I'm not sexually active, Can yu get herpes from not being sexually active, is it possible? Or are they just sores and blisters? my bumps aren't near my hair follicules and their not inside my vaginal part, they are on the creases where the underwear cover like with a bathing suit, where my thigh stars and leg fold to vagina. What should I do? 
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i'm sexually active. but I've been getting these boil/blister looking things even before I was sexually active. This bump came back inn the exact same place recently after I shaved. It only causes pain when I try and pop this particular one.... 
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