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Hi everyone and Good Morning, You won't believe this but I just put in form my regular 3 month prescription for type 2 diabetes. Can you believe it, my blood glucose test strips were refused by my GP. How can that be? What do I do now? How can you be denied something you really need. I check my blood 4 times a day and sometimes more. Has anyone else run into this problem. If you you did, were you able to do anything about it? Oh please, tell me what you did. I haven't a clue of where to even start to see if I can get this corrected. Sincerely, worried.

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Hi Guest,

Ask your GP why they refused the test strips.  That's the easiest place to start.

Maybe it was a mix-up.

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Hello, Believe me, you're not the first person that that has happened to. Being refused glucose test strips by your GP is fairly common. Why would this happen? Well, the amount of test strips available to you may have been reduced as a cost savings by your healthcare insurance or primary care holder. Savings for them can be considerable. Consider that some people waste test strips either because they don't use them properly or are careless. The test strips are expensive and it all adds up. The first thing you need to do is contact or doctor and ask him/her to explain why you have been denied temporarily (or even stopped) test strips. In some cases, the amount of test strips has been reduced. Find out if this decision was made by your healthcare team and if it is based on your particular circumstances (personal) or if this restriction was made by your healthcare provider without taking into consideration what your personal needs are. Any decision about your test strips should be reached between your healthcare people and YOU!

You will have to present information as to why you need to take blood glucose levels and how often you do that. Provide information on your test results from your recorded glucose levels and what you do based on those glucose levels. Bring this information to your GP or health team and discuss it with them. Now, if you GP/health team feel that you are not monitoring properly and not acting on the information, you can ask them for further training to educate you in proper usage. This may not be your issue and their decision may be wrong. This is the only way to find out and get something done.

It could be that there is a restrictive policy throughout your area. You need to get a copy of this and read it. Your GP or team may not be following guidelines for whatever reason. You need to know this too.

Make sure to make it well known what actions you take after doing a blood sugar level measurement. This helps to stress how you are using your test strips and how important they are to managing your diabetes. Let the professionals know if you are at risk of hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis. This is very important because you really need those strips. If you work a job that involves a lot of physical activity, they need to know about that as well. Think about it, sit down, and make a list. State your case!
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