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I have a lot of perimenopausal symptoms-nighty hot flashes, insominia, anxiety, frequent periods, etc., but I've also had swollen glands for the past few weeks. I'm really concerned that it could be cancer, HIV, or chronic fatigue. Could it be related to menopause or just some passing viral infection that lasts for a while? I never have a full blown fever, just sometimes feel like I'm very warm inside. (sometimes I have chills too and the sweating/hot flashes is usually at night). I don't have the money for a million tests but would like to take ones that might be key.

Thanks.

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Hi there! I haven’t heard that lymph nodes would swell just because someone’s approaching menopause or experiencing menopausal symptoms.
Lymph nodes swell when they are fighting an infection and they go away when you get rid of the infection but may persist for some time depending on the infection I guess.

Honestly, it is impossible to say what it could be since all your other symptoms can be contributed to menopause. I understand that you don’t have a lot of money for the tests but you should see a doc anyway.

By examining you, hearing your symptoms and problems, touching you lymoh nodes, they are more likely to find something out and you should certainly say about your money problem.

Don’t you have insurance?
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I am 26 years old and have been experiencing some perimenopausal symptoms since I had my first baby 6 months ago. Many of the symptoms seem to be related to hormonal imbalance. For the last few months I have had moderate night sweats (bad enough to soak my shirt sometimes twice a night, and soak my hair around the bottom half of my head). Depression, irritability, and anxiety are issues at the end of my 28 day birth control regimen. I have fibrocystic breasts, and have recently been diagnosed with a growing uterine fibroid, (which seems to cause irregular periods, and painful intercourse). A couple of weeks ago the gland on my right jaw line became tender, red, and swollen. After a couple of days it began to hurt less and start shrinking and is now almost gone. I am only concerned because, even though it is noticeably shrinking and going away, it still seems to be fixed to the skin. I have read so many different things, from lymphoma to HIV to menopause. I don't know what to think, although what I do know, is all that info is scary when you don't know whats going on! Is this something to be scared about, and how do you fix the night sweats? :-(
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1) Get your FSH levels checked and make sure they are rising-or-that your hormones are changing and it is menopause before assuming its the reason for the sweating (a ob/gyn doctor could tell this) 2) have your thyroid tested; there is something called "thyroiditis" and other thyroid problems that can cause sweating and rapid heat beat (and thus anxiety) and left untreated can become dangerous especially if you have a hypo (or low thryoid) starting to become hyper (over active) which-often occurs "only" at night with some serious conditions that are mistakenly diagnosised as "hypothyroidism" yet are more serious! You need to see a Endocrinologist (if this is the problem) 3) are you having a fever -predominately in the evening hours? (this can signal hodgkins) disease which can be cured more than not if treated and caught early on! .... I would MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH A INTERNIST-DOCTOR and get a FULL WORK UP in light of so many symptoms I would just go straight to him/her for a diagnosis and some testing! Then they can refer you for adequate follow up! I have lupus and trust me -my thyroid went nutz like this for over-a year-I went through this circus and it was NOT FUN! FINALLY they got it figured out-but it was heading towards life threatening. SO don't take chances with your life just guessing!
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I’m reading a fabulous book by Suzanne Somers called Ageless, the naked truth about bio identical hormone replacement. Your hormones might be out of balance. Lots of great health info in this book, it would be helpful to anyone. Good luck!
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