Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

Hi everyone,

My dad is 72 now and at his latest appointment his cardiologist told us he needs to have heart bypass surgery because his arteries are blocked. Since he had a heart attack five months ago, and he’s just recovered from a nearly deadly heart attack at this age – how dangerous will it be for my dad to have heart bypass surgery?

His cardiologist did his best to assure us that majority of his patients are around 70 or older and that we can expect dad to be walking  in a day or two and to be able to return home after a week. That seems way too quick for a heart surgery, especially done to someone who is barely recovered from heart attack. Should we look for a second opinion or are we worrying for nothing?

thanks

Loading...

Hi Mandyl,

Recovery depends upon what type of surgery they perform but in general, yes, he can be up and around soon - depending upon his health.

You really do want them to be active soon after surgery.  It helps recovery, walking is good for the heart, and it helps prevent more clots from forming. 

He also should have the surgery sooner rather than later.  The longer you wait the worse condition the body is to begin with and recovery takes longer.

Get a second opinion if you have any doubts.

Reply

Loading...


Get a second opinion. Take the copies of the labs and tests to the next doctor and have him or her look it over. If he has barely recovered from his heart attack the biggest dangerous will probably be from the anesthesia, not the blockages themselves. I was a cardiac critical care nurse, and I've never seen anyone walk the day after bypass surgery. There are far too many things still hooked up to the patient -- up to a chair, maybe, but walking? The most common setback for anyone in that age group having bypass surgery is cognitive changes. Memory problems and depression can ensure. Getting a second opinion might result in another doctor recommending a medication or another way to treat the blockages. Did anyone mention a stent?
Reply

Loading...