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Hi everyone, I'm new here, although not new to running, and am hoping someone can relate to my current shoe problem. I never thought that I was a toe runner, but after talking with the fellow runners at my gym, several have told me that I run on my toes. I don't know if this is just a natural thing for me since I do a lot of speed work, but I haven't been able to find a shoe that will work for me.

I went to a local running store where the owner has been fitting people for 30 something years. He took one look at me and said that he could tell how I was standing that I had ultra high arches. So I was measured, put in orthotic inserts and sent on my way with NB ISS. Hate them!

I do find that the ball area of my foot and sometimes my toes get a little numb towards the end of my run - frustrating when your body gives out before your endurance. I do get blisters even with the inserts on my big toe, and find that the front of my foot needs a boxier toe area to my shoes.

Sorry for the long winded post, any and all suggestions are welcome! :)

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check out newtonrunning great new shoes designed to take your typical runner and force them to run more towards their midfoot and toes some great technology in them and have some great athletes backing them up!!
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Speedy, a couple of things worry me about your post.
You mention putting orthontics in your new shoes; who prescribed the orthontics, a chiropodist/podiatrist or the the running store man?
I question this because if you have a naturally high arch you would as you say, land on your toes/forefoot.
Is there any need for the support or stabilisation?
There is so much B...S... written about shoes and their various claims, if as you say, you run on your toes (which is wrong as far as running technique goes) I see no need for motion control; a great selling factor but whats the point if you don't need it.
A decent pair of mid-range price shoes with no motion control would be what I'd be looking for. Buy them when you have been on your feet for some time and buy them a half size bigger than normal.
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Just a quick note--came here looking for shoe suggestions ideal for folks who don't land on their heel, and had to respond to the person who said "toe-running is wrong for running form."

I have been a runner for 20 years, and am switching to running on the fore-part of my foot vs. heel strike to prolong my running life. Since I've made the switch (it's basically running the way you would as if you were barefoot), I have transformed my running experience. There simply is a lightness to my stride that has never been there before, and I run without pain.

If this is what wrong running form feels like, I so wish I'd been wrong ten years earlier!
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I am also worried about your shoe fitting. There are plenty of specialist shoes on the market that cater for high arched and have lots of fore foot cushioning without the need for custom inserts. In fact, i have heard some people say that putting inserts into a running shoe is not a good idea as it interferes with the workings of the shoe.
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Hello, new here as well. I came across this because I am a toe runner. Been doing it at least my 14 years in the military. I have high arches and wide feet. My opinion just based on how I experience running. A few things.
1) support not needed for running on toes, no contact
2) support would probably cause blisters on the arch as it is soft from never touching shoes, I had a pair that caused some.
3) shoes still matter, I usually have limited options due to my width, but when running on toes you need a nice firm shoe(soft under pressure), your putting massive pressure on one spot repeatedly. The padding wears out
4) no idea how to stop the toes from falling asleep. I am 230 lbs and after 15 minutes I will start to feel the tingle. I try to switch to regular style running and it gets the circulation back, but the tingle comes back quick.
5) I have no idea how people can run heal to toe. I can get as close as about flat footed running, which I can feel in my teeth, before I feel straining. You can always tell toe runners from thick calves.
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i would say that putting inerts into a running shoe not just a bad idea, but harmful for your feet! your shoes should fit you perfectly without any insertions
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