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Although I did not have any symptoms but diarrhea, my doctor decided to perform colonoscopy. That was good decision because he found I have polyps on rectum. That worried me so much, because I do not understand why this occurs. I would like to hear something about polyps on rectum, how to know if I have cancerous or not. Tell me more about treatment and prognosis if I am diagnosed with cancerous or non-cancerous polyps on rectum.

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There are some inherited conditions, which can cause hundreds of polyps to grow in the colon and rectum. Some polyps are mushroom-shaped protrusions on the end of the stalk. Other rectum polyps may appear as bumps that lie flat against the intestinal wall. Surgery is always recommended to remove the affected section of the intestine. Otherwise, it is almost certain that at least one of these polyps will turn into cancer by middle age. Most adults are at risk of developing fewer polyps later in life, but they are still at risk of some possible complications. Often, the doctor can remove polyps during a colonoscopy, by cutting the polyp from the wall of the colon. I guess he did not remove them immediately, because sometimes, open surgery through the abdomen is necessary to remove polyps. For cancerous polyps, surrounding tissue or a section of the colon should be removed as well. Although it is estimated that 30% of middle-aged and older people have colon polyps, less than 1% ever become cancerous.
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