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How do I lose weight? Is there only some foods I can eat? Please help

 

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ok i have been reading over a year since i had my gallbladder taking out..Here what i came up with...when we had our gallbladder the liver stored bile in it and when we ate food the gallbladder opened up and released the bile which mixed with vitamin b12 and then broke up the good fat from the bad fat and combined the good fat with the bile and stored it in our intestines...now that we dont have a gallbladder it is constantly dripping bile in our intestines and i do believe the bile is causing the weight gain in our stomach...we need something to make the bile come out since it only comes out when we eat is proof it is sticking to our intestines making us gain weight if we eat any fat that fat is also stuck to our gut to...people who have constipation after surgery my opion is that they are eating healthy food and the bile is making all the good fat stick to the intestines so we all our gaining weight its a no win situation where we eat good or bad we will still gain weight from the bile so i am going to start taking vitamin b12 that is what mixs with the bile to break it up like it did before...they said we would be fine but we are not we are gaing weight even if we eat healthy...so we need to figure out how to fix it i would not take bile salts because our liver is constantly producing bile that is the problem...they need to make a pill to make the bile come out rather than stick to us and i am worried it will make my pancreas go bad in few year because i feel my pancreas and liver are working 24 hrs a day now where the bile is constantly dripping.....this is my opion i have done alot of reading on it someone please help us....i have gained almost 100 pounds ina year and i eat healthy its only in my stomach.... and i gain wheather i eat good or bad i am going to start taking the vitamins centrum and calcium because we are lactose intollerant now and we need vitamin d we need all the vitamins we were getting before fish oil...vitamin c,d,e b12....when we had the gallbladder.....
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I had my gall bladder removed 3 weeks ago yesterday on 30th May 2008 and I have realised this odd roll of what looks like fat sitting just on and below my rib cage. My gall bladder was sat quite high and I'm told this is common. Anyhow I have just been hunting the web as one wound isn't healing as well as it should and found this on www.forums.dietpower.com that was posted by a lady called Jessica who is a a nurse:

"After research, my husband has a theory on what may be happening:
it makes since that physicians would think that weight loss should occur. There is less bile, which means less fat asorbtion, which means the fat comes out in your stool, which means the fat is not ushered into fat cells via the bile. Viola! Weight loss.

This is not true. There is a mechanism at work here that is not fully understood or researched. The reason it's not fully researched is because there is no money in it. It would be hell to convince a drug company and the FDA to approve a food supplement or a precription med that helped with post cholecystectomy patients. A huge meal ticket for general surgeons are cholecystectomies. 600,000 are performed each year.

This is our theory on why weight is packed on instead of lost: Bile is needed to help absorb the fat and break it down into vital fat soluable vitamins. A, D, E, and K. When the predictable amounts of bile is lost, the liver must work overtime to compensate by "guessing" at how much bile is going to be needed to digest your meal. Sometimes it overshoots, and diarrhea happens. Sometimes it doesn't secrete enough, and constipation happens. Hardly anything nutritious is absorbed. Therefore, your body shoves the fat somewhere else for later: in your fat tissue. Our bodies have been thrown into a fuctional "mal absorbtion syndrome". Our body thinks we aren't getting nutrients we need, so it holds on to everything, packing it where ever it can, for possible energy stores later. Fatigue results from this.

It would make sense to replace in our body what we lost from the function of the GB. The GB is NOT useless, it is VITAL in helping us metabolize and break down fats properly.

We are going to try the "weight loss kit" that this woman sells, for people after having their GB out. It is basically bile salts, PLUS a BHB fat metabolizer, Mega Acid A, etc. It would seem reasonable that since our built in metabolizer was removed, that we must manually put in digestive aids to metabolize the fat we take in.

I'll keep my results posted. And to the VERY FEW lucky ones proclaiming they lost weight or maintained their weights after having their gallbladder out: congratualtions, and consider yourself abnormal. This is not the norm. We are happy for you, but do not need your weight loss thrown in our face and your self proclaiming medical advice of "it must just be what we are eating." Does it make you feel better to bring people to tears that are struggling with their weight for no known reason? Since your body has adjusted so well after having your GB removed, that may suggest your liver is already working too hard to compensate. Be prepared for colitis, ulcers, and bile stones in your liver later on in life.

For all of us in THIS boat, don't be too hard on yourself. There IS a reason for all this. Just because it's not fully understood, doesn't mean it's not there."


It seems to explain all the weight gain you get post surgery, which I found helpful though I live in the UK and I'm not suggesting you try anything which she tried but the infomation sems very good.

I still have yet to find out why one of my wound sites is not healing.

Hope this helps :D
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With bile trickling into your digestive system constantly after gallbladder removal surgery, there may not be enough or it could be too diluted to perform well. Everyone says your digestive system is still fully functional after gallbladder removal surgery, but the fact is that it will change. A lot. Weight gain is quite common. It can happen even if you do your best to follow a healthy gallbladder removal diet devoid of processed foods and too much fat and sugar. Inflammation also plays a role in weight gain. 

However, eating plenty of fruits and veggies, lean meats, fish, and smaller portions, will help you lose weight. It won't be easy but a healthy lifestyle is still the best remedy. Now more than ever, do not resort to crash diets!

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Living without a Gallbladder

By: Dr. Loretta Lanphier, ND, CN, HHP


Roughly 20 million Americans suffer from gallstones, and 750,000 of them have their gallbladders removed each year. There are 800,000 hospitalizations $2 billion spend annually on gallbladder disease.


For most people the pain of a malfunctioning gallbladder eventually becomes unbearable. After one or two trips to the emergency room the suggestion of surgery is met with certain approval. Unfortunately this may or may not end the pain and discomfort. The probable after-effects of gallbladder surgery are never discussed with the patient which leaves the patient with the impression that all will be well after surgery. But it doesn't take long to realize that all is "not well" and the patient soon begins to feel very betrayed by their surgeon and doctor who did not prepare them for "life without a gallbladder."


Contrary to medical opinion the gallbladder is of use to the body. The gallbladder is a small sac underneath your liver that stores and secretes bile, a digestive fluid that breaks down fats. Gallstones form when the chemical compounds in bile become unbalanced -- no one's sure exactly why this happens, but a diet high in fat often makes the problem worse. Since bile is actually produced by the liver, it's possible to survive without a gallbladder, but often not without unpleasant digestive tract complications.The gallbladder is like a pump. Without it, the liver can't secrete enough bile to properly digest a full meal. Many people experience symptoms such as diarrhea, gas, abdominal pain, bloating, indigestion, constipation, increased allergies, liver congestion, itchy skin and autoimmune diseases. Some patients suffer from dumping syndrome, in which food is "dumped" too quickly into the intestines from the stomach.


Suggestions for living without a gallbladder:

Diet is extremely important. Eat low-fat, high fiber, organic and healthy. Eliminate refined carbohydrates and hydrogenated oils.

Liver Flush - Every four months. People without gallbladders may develop stones in the liver which will lead to a sluggish liver.

Parasite Cleanse - Two times a year. I recommend a six-week course of Para-Buster then maintenance for 3 weeks.

Digestive Enzymes - Take 3-5 capsules at least 15 minutes before each meal. You will need to take enzymes for the rest of your life in order to digest the good fats (Omega 3) which are essential for good health.

Reduce chemical overload on the liver (pre-packaged food, personal care products, lawn products, perfumes, cosmetics, etc.)

Drink only filtered water - Try to drink 1/2 your body weight in ounces of water every day.

Use a Probiotic - I recommend Latero-Flora or Primal Defense.

Reduce animal intake (meat and dairy) - When consuming animal products make sure they are free-range, organic and hormone-free.

Eliminate white sugar and white flour.

Consume a green drink or pills equal to one-two tablespoons daily. Quantum Greens is a good choice.

Activated Charcoal - Some people have found that this helps with symptoms as it helps to sequester bile acid.

Chinese Bitters (Chinese Gentian with Bupleurum) in the morning and Coptis with Bupleurum at night to stimulate bile flow.

Exercise daily for 30 minutes. Walking is highly suggested.

Following the above suggestions will ensure that your digestive system operates to its fullest and will help to alleviate many of the side-effects from gallbladder removal.

So your gallbladder is gone...that's the past. It's time to move on and educate yourself in getting healthy and feeling better. Following the above suggestions will ensure that your digestive system operates to its fullest and will help to alleviate many of the side-effect from gallbladder removal. You can feel good again after gallbladder surgery, but for most it will mean committing to a total lifestyle change that will be beneficial in more ways than just one.

As with most disease, prevention is the best solution, but when disease strikes remember that there are always solutions and always hope.


If you have any doubts about the self-healing power of your body,
consult your naturopath or health practitioner for advise!
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I have been searching high and low for this kind of information. I had my gall bladder removed 2 weeks ago because of dyskinesia. I am in much less pain, but lots of digestive issues and all of the other things I have read suggest a diet which may be non-inflammatory but is also high-glycemic and devoid of nutritional value. My pre-surgery diet consisted mainly of fresh vegetables, barley, poultry, legumes, olive oil, fish oil, evening primrose oil, all of which are very important to my health and stability. And most of those now cause difficulties. I have used PB8 probiotics in the past, and with the support of your post will do a lot more research into enzymes. What do you think about bile salts?
Thank you,
Eva
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I'm so glad to have found this information on SteadyHealth.com. I had my gallbladder removed in July and since then, I have been battling weight gain. I've gone from 136lbs to 150lbs and for my height and frame this is not bad. I too have what feels like a mountain or roll of fat right below my breasts that just seems to sort of sit on the rib cage. I've done everything to try to work this off and nothing is working. I ride am encumberent bike every night an hour or so after dinner for 5 miles. After that, I do step aerobics for the next 10 to 15 minutes while my body temperature is still very warm. Combined with exercise, I've changed the types of food I'm eating, I take vitamins A, D, E and B6 every day, as well as I'm taking a Green Tea diet pill to help me. One would think I would at least lose a pound, one stinking pound, but it's not happening. >:( :$
Now that I've found the information here, I know what to expect since having my gallbladder out. I understand how the gallbladder, liver and intestines all work together. They don't tell you any of this prior to surgery or afterwards either. This information is vital and from here I'm going to keep researching and I'm going to switch over to B12 too and see if this helps as well.
Has anyone felt a strange feeling under the right breast, almost like a grabbing or squeezing, even sort of a numbing sensation since having their gallbladder removed?
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Hi. I too gained a ton of weight from having gallbladder out. The doctors don't tell you this stuff, they are only interested in the money. Since I had that done I have gotten into herbal remedies and natural healing. I wish I knew all this stuff before because I could have kept my gallbladder. I just went and bought digestive enzymes tonight and I'm going to start taking them with every meal. Hopefully this will help. I am wondering if the enzymes will take care of the fat roll too sitting on my ribcage as well, since the lack of gallblader is clearly the culprit. Anyone have any luck with the enzymes? Anyone have any suggestions they have tried and want to share??? :-D
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I had my gallbladder out 13 months ago. Before that I was a vegetarian with a fairly healthy diet (though I did eat cheese and candy often.) Immediately after the surgery, I lost 10 lbs. I avoided any fat, because I had bile dumping diarrhea right afterwards if I ate it. Eventually I felt "normal" for awhile and began to resume my old eating habits. I did not increase food consumption. I began to exercise every day and left my desk job for a medical job that required me to be on my feet lifting bodies every day. Within six months I gained 20 lbs. I slowed down and reduced my calories and gained another 5 lbs. My BMI went through the roof and suddenly a "normal" girl became an obese person. :-( I adopted a vegan diet, desperate to shed at least 10 lbs. and be at a semi-healthy weight (merely "overweight" instead of "obese.") After eliminating ALL animal fat from my diet, I lost 6 lbs. I took it to the vegan extreme and avoided anything non-vegan including white sugar, non-vegan wine and beer, white flour, even vegetable soup... And I gained 4 lbs. back. Now I am at a point of utter confusion and desperation with my well-being. My doctor believes I gained weight because I began eating too much since I no longer had gall bladder pain. Absolutely untrue! I began to eat healthier after my surgery. Now a year later, I've never been so unhealthy in my life! I've been exercising 30-90 minutes a day, eating vegan, drinking water, sleeping properly and eating 1200 calories a day or less. What else can I do? Do I have to consider surgery to get back to a healthy weight?? Does anyone have advice? The last few weeks have been sad. :-(
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HI. I had my gb out in 1995 at the age of 34. I have had all the issues that others have listed here except the 'swampy stools'. ( most often am constipated.. :'( ) I had gradual weight gain after the surgery for about the first 10 years...thinking it it was age related , I fought in frustration but to no avail. After a life threatening (and altering) DVT 5 years ago, the added complication of having to take coumadin and the 'diet' they recommend I have steadily gained 8-10 pounds per year. I have tried everything. After reading the post above written by the doctor, I will give that a shot and hope others are as well. I will post any results , good or bad.
By the way ..due to my other medical issues, I can not do rigorous exercises and am starting a daily yoga routine along with this doctors suggestions.
Good luck to all of you ! Please post results and suggestions for all of us fellow sufferers! :-D
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I had my gb removed 5/09. I would fluctuate anywhere from 120-125 pre-surgery. I am at 130 now and the scale will not move. I am a runner who averages about 12 miles a week in addition to cross-training two days a week. While 130 is certainly a healthy weight for a 5'3" 33 yo woman, it is the fact that it is utterly uncontrolable and 5 lbs is a big difference when you're talking pants sizes. I am a very diligent person in watching what I eat. I have experimented with bile salts to no avail. Even while race training and logging heavy milage, the scale does not move. I am heavier in my lower gut, which seems to be the opposite of what many have reported. Am terrified of what might happen if I ever had to take a break from running.
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I had my Gallbladder removed in 2008 and have serious health issues that you have mentioned. I have problems with pain after each meal regardless of healthy or fatty content, and also have major weight gain issues since my surgery. I agree with the idea of our fat being stored in our intestines and truly wish there was a pill to help us!!! I am 5'3", 40, and 135lbs. I want my healthy weight back of 115lbs!

I also notice that the weight gain after my surgery is extensively cellulite ridden; my thighs and even upper arms contain hail damage... :'(
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I too am having problems similar to a lot of you. I had my gallbladder removed Sept 2009 and as of April 2010 I have gained 9 pounds. This while doing p90x daily and running 3x a week. I take fish oil, multivitamins, digestive enzymes, probiotics and now recently lactaid (since I believe I have become lactose intolerant since my surgery). All of this is to battle the constant digestive issues I have. I eat very healthy...whole grains, lean protein, fruits. I do not drink soda or eat any processed foods. I have never been a water drinker before, but now that is all I drink. Before the surgery, I weighed between 130-135 for 20 years. If I wanted to tone up, I'd have no problem doing so in a few months with running/exercise. Now, with constant exercise I have cellulite ridden saddle bags and mid-section fat. These were never problems I had before. I am currently counting calories, fat, protein and carbs to make sure I am ingesting enough (and on paper, I should be in optimum health). I KNOW what I am experiencing is related to my gallbladder removal. Please...If anyone has found anything that can help I am willing to try.
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Hi,

I had my GB removed about a year ago. I have been struggling with weight loss for many years but find it even harder now that I have had my GB removed. I didn't know about the consequences of removing my GB and since I have had it removed I have been doing more research. I am so saddened because I did gain weight and I have tried to lose weight. I tried the Vegan and Vegetarian diet, because I was so desperate to figure my digestive system out. One year later, I am still so confused. Everything I eat seems to do me no good, I am so frustrated. I am also desperately trying to lose some weight, and hope to adjust my diet even more. I read the doctors notes above and think that was a great explanation and should help me a bit more. Just so frustrating to have to deal with this everyday. :'( :'(
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I started Weight Watchers several years ago and got down to 112 (I am 5'3) Since then anytime that I have put on a few extra pounds I have been able to take it off very easily. I had my GB removed 12/17/10 and gained 15 pounds! Although I wasn't eating the best I just couldn't seem to lose anything. After reading this blog last week and several others I realized weight gain after GB removal is common. Who knew?! My doctor sure didn't warn me. Anyway...I have good news to report and hopefully some information that may help some of you. First of all, I am still following Weight Watchers but have completely changed what I eat. Check out the gallbladder diet on I cut out everything on the list of foods to avoid. I have been eating things like fruit, oatmeal, veggies, veggie burgers, roasted soy nuts and edamame, some whole wheat bread and pasta. I stepped up my work outs to almost 1 hour per day and have lost 3.5 pounds in the last week! Also...the horrible bloating I was experiencing is nearly gone!! I hope this helps! Good luck.


***edited by moderator*** web addresses not allowed
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