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Hi, I had a bunionectomy on March 21'st, 2007. The first week was painful and went as was expected. I saw the dr. for post op dressing changes and had x-rays taken at the third week post op visit. This dr. is very reputable and did a bunonectomy and hammertoe correction on my other foot in 1998 and 1999.

The problem is that for the last week, the bottom of my foot where the first metatarsal head is, is very painful and I can not put any pressure on it. I have had to put my post op walking shoe back on and find myself walking on the side of my foot because it hurts so much to put any pressure on it at all. I was sent to physical therapy for 3x a week for 4 weeks and the physical therapist was surprised that I have so much pain. I am back to taking Vicodin for the pain. I already take Methadone for back pain and it does nothng for the foot pain. I am 53 years old, and it was a moderate bunionectomy with an osteotomy. My foot is still very swollen and I know I have a pin it my foot. I also feel a lot of twinges of pain like something is pushing on my foot, the top where it was cut and on the bottom where it hurts. The incison spot itself when touched does not hurt at all. Does anyone have any idea if this is normal or has anyone else experienced this kind of pain? When I had my bunionectomy before, I don't remember this kind of pain. Thanks for any suggestions or ideals. I see my dr. for a checkup next week. Patcat

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CRPS Become a Loincloth of Some Surgeons , From Richard Qian.



Dear Professor and suffering patients:

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) Become a Loincloth of Some Surgeons' Big Mistake.

I am very appreciating to you to read my letter. But this is for Procedure of Bunion surgery except for me. All of Textbook didn't think about and talk about how many and how easy the Dorsal vein to be destroyed and it is very strong relative to post-operation pain and long-lasting swelling and disability (Three months to one year). Every Surgeon used RDS or whatever to be loincloth to say it is normal. It really isn't normal if we can think again and change our mind.

Three months after my wife went through the bunion surgery in MCW, The foot and four toes continues very swelling, painful and can't stand. Two Doctors said it is normal, because Textbook said it. I guess 10--20% of all, even up to 50% of patients suffering those, But most doctors didn't write it down on medical document. So, I know, sometimes, Surgery is really bad thing. When I check the foot, it is clear to show it all has been cut or ligated including 1/3 of Dorsal Venous Arch, first and second Dorsal Metatarsal Veins, Medial Marginal Vein, and maybe first two of Perforating Veins. It is unbelievable. But it is real. You can see them. I like show you the pictures and reasons.



The REASONS Doctors didn't care about dorsal foot vein are: First, all textbook didn't talk and didn't say be careful, and none good research has done for bunion surgery. If it is necessary, cut one dorsal vein is reasonable. But cutting more than one and up to four is really disaster to a lot of patients. None of textbooks say Doctor should mark the vein’s position for protection before the surgery, especially thumb toes. Second, because culture and most patients are women, the male doctors don’t have chance to see and touch the real foot and foot vein and to learn enough. The dorsal foot vein isn’t simple superficial veins. When people walk, they hold 50% function for circulation. When people stand stilly, they hold 80-100% function. What a disaster it was destroyed. Pain, swelling, infection, disability, unhealling, ununioning, everything follows. Third, No instrument examination to shows whether the veins are destroyed, SO, doctors and patients all think the disaster doesn’t exist or doesn’t come from those vein’s ligating. Forth, some doctors think it is very helpful to use plastic surgery techniques to close the incision. It really is to avoid ligating veins for vein protection, I think.



I was a medical student and I have designed a wonderful procedure for goats’ perfusion in Physiology, Medical college of Wisconsin. So I think it is highly possibility my opinion is right. If you agree with me, it will benefit everyone for my wife to suffer so many.

Thank you so much for your time.



Yours sincerely,



Richard Qian,



The Medical College of Wisconsin, Physiology.
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This pain was the worse pain in my life. I had this surgery 7 years ago and whenever I remember it, tears start to fall. It was really ugly experience and ugly pain, thank God I am fine now, but that joint pain and that painful little toe is something that I just can't describe. Swelling, stiffness. Awful!

But I have to say that I also did a huge mistake since I started to walk immediately believing that this is not heavy surgery and that everything is going to be ok. Also, you really should know that it takes over a year for a bunion surgery site to heal completely and during that year you really need to be careful and to watch your septs, literally.  When you are in this condition, the bone is prone to pain and swelling during that entire time unless the foot is well protected and you have to pay attention to it. I didn't. That is why I felt this pain. 

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I had a bunionectomy almost seven months ago. I still have swelling and the bottom of my foot hurts. I suddenly developed a severe bee sting type pain. The doctor removed the pin at that point. There is a lump where it was removed and I feel nerve pain. The nerve discomfort spread all around my foot and even up my legs. I had some toe therapy to help it flex and it was after that the nerve pain developed. It was like a big "snap" feeling and I saw stars. I take Napracin now and it helps the nerve discomfort, but still have pain on bottom of foot and calf. I cannot get into shoes comfortably. >;) >;)
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A typical bunion takes two months on a normal level but not uncommon for the bottom of the foot and the top where the incision line is to have twitching, jerks, dull sensation. For the first 3 weeks, no weight bearing on the foot except emergencies where u should put the foot down only on the heel. After the sutures and pin is pulled, you can start exercising the big toe by flexing it several times a day. If you have a slow healing period, elevate the foot and pack on ice to help ease the discomfort, even after you've begun to walk. Sometimes you can have hip pain on the other leg even as you start walking on the bunion foot. My foot is still swollen and I cannot get into any of my regular shoes- it has been 3 months but my other foot I had no problem at all; most likely any discomfort may be due to ur age and weight. I was 40lbs. lighter and in great shape with the other foot's surgery with no problems. This time- yes, older, heavier so it does make it slower to heal and move around and bounce back quickly pre-shape. Take comfort it will get back to normal in time.
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