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Hi,
I have been sick more on then off for the past 6.5 months. It began with stomach pain that would not go away. I was sent to a gastro specialist who ordered swallow since it felt like someone was squeezing the life out of me, came back negative. Then an abdominal ultrasound, in Nov negative. Pain continued and got worse. I was nauseas and dry heaved and had diahreah just about everymorning waking me at 3 am. At times there would be yellow in the commode and when I wipped myself on the toilet paper. The doctors said they didn't know what it was. In December I had an EGD showed a small hietal hernia. Gastro doc told me he had no idea what was wrong with me and sent me back to my primary doctor.

Over three weeks I felt great, back to my old self. In January it started all over again but worse. I was awaken by the worst pain I ever had in my right side under my rib cage and around my back. I was at my GP the next morning. She pressed on my gall bladder but there was no pain. She ordered a stool sample, and hida scan. They both came back negative. The pain would not go away, she sent me to a surgeon. He told me that the hida scan showed my gall bladder was at 34% ejection rate. Told me to eat yogurt. I had seen him for pain 3-4 years ago. The egd at the time he did showed cholestorl crystals in my stomach.

Over the next couple of months I kept going back to him because of the pain, he ordered a complete x ray of my lower body, ct scan. Finally in mid March, I had another odd attack after taking some olive oil to calm down my hietal hernia. CT scan showed I had an embiblical hernia and two old pockets of diverticulis he said where non active. xray showed nothing. I have also had an unbelievable amount of blood work done.

I had my gall bladder removed on March 27th, a Friday. On Monday I had unbelievable stomach pain. They sent me to get more blood work showed my liver function as fine.

I got better over the next three weeks, saw the doctor.. All was well. The day after I saw him the pain started again. It was off and on for a week. Not as bad as before, same thing, diahreah, nausea, yellow in the commode, stomach pain. The next two weeks were great. Felt wonderful. Then this past Wednesday, I had diahreah all day. Thursday ok. Friday stomach pain, unbelievable pain. Yesterday diahrea with so much yellow, I had to flush twice. Last night I woke up at 4 with stomach pain and nausea. At 6 I had such odd bm, it looked like deflated long ballons. In fact one was hanging when I went to stand up, about 7-8 inchses long. I got a good look at it, and it looked like a long deflated balloon. I am rung out this morning. And I have no idea what to do. With all the tests that have been run and showed nothing. I believe that the gall bladder removal was like an elimination test. But I don't think that was it.

Any help, would be greatly appreciated. I am a 47 yr old woman. I have a 9 year old. I am making my family miserable. I am begging for help.

Marianne Jarrett

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There's two things that come to mind in reading this. I'm just throwing these out there because I'm not a medical professional but I think that these could be viable options. Maybe you can see your doctor and ask for them to run tests regarding this for you. Ask about celiac disease or IBS. There's a third possibility that it is anxiety related, so you might also want to look into antidepressants. I hope you understand that I'm not implying that you have depression or anything--just hoping to throw out some ideas to see if any stick! I wish you luck in your recovery, and hope you feel better soon. Let us know about your progress.
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I am a 56 yr old woman. I had my gall bladder removed 1/30/13, and still having problems. I have yellow watery stool, and I am very bloated. My insurance has expired. I heard there is a medicine called Bile Salt that could help. Does anyone know about any of this?

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Gallbladder surgery can help relieve pain, but this procedure is not without risks. In addition to the more immediate post-surgical risks of bleeding, fever, and infection, having digestive problems is a potential risk after gallbladder surgery. Your gallbladder stores the bile that your liver produces. When your body needs it, the gallbladder squeezes the bile through tubes called bile ducts into your small intestine. Bile helps break down fats from meals. But sometimes, the substances that comprise bile, including cholesterol, bile salts, and bilirubin, can build up too much and harden into gallstones. This is the most common reason for gallbladder removal and luckily, your gallbladder is one organ you can live without, since an adequate amount of bile can flow out of your liver and through your bile ducts to the intestine without having to enter the gallbladder first. So most people do not have any problems eating or digesting food after having gallbladder removal surgery. But sometimes problems occur, and some gallbladder removal side effects can affect the way you eat and digest foods. While it is not the norm to experience digestive problems after gallbladder surgery, You can experience difficulty digesting fatty foods. Some people have a slightly more difficult time digesting fatty foods for the first month after surgery. Eating a low-fat diet may help. Temporary diarrhea may occur because your gallbladder is no longer there to regulate the flow of bile, it will flow more constantly, but in smaller amounts, into your small intestine. This can lead to diarrhea for the first few days after surgery in many people. This is most often temporary, and no treatment is needed; however, if you have diarrhea that lasts for more than three days, call your doctor. Chronic diarrhea in some people who did not previously have more than one bowel movement per day will find themselves having more frequent bowel movements after gallbladder removal. These can sometimes be loose and watery, and be accompanied by a sense of urgency. Recent studies have found that this can occur in up to 17 percent of people after gallbladder removal. Men younger than age 50, especially if they are obese, have the highest likelihood of long-term diarrhea after gallbladder surgery, but a significant number of people without those risk factors may also have diarrhea for months to years after surgery. Eating a low-fat diet may help lessen symptoms, and treatments with medications which bind the excess bile acids, which are thought to be the cause of this bothersome symptom, often alleviates the problem. Retained stone in a bile duct. In some cases, a gallstone will remain in your common bile duct after gallbladder surgery. This can block the flow of bile into your small intestine and result in pain, fever, nausea, vomiting, bloating, and jaundice soon after surgery. You may need an additional procedure to remove gallstones that are retained in your common bile duct. You will sometimes need to insist your physician check for this. Intestinal injury. Although it is rare, the instruments used during your gallbladder surgery could damage your intestines. Your doctor will take measures to minimize the risk of this complication during the surgery. If it occurs, you might experience abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and fever. Any post-surgical symptoms like this require immediate medical attention. It is important to call your doctor immediately if you are having digestive problems after gallbladder surgery. They can be signs of serious complications. Even if he determines your symptoms do not require medical care, your doctor may be able to help you manage them.
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