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Any pregnancy is life changing, and I bet you can t wait to share the news with family and friends. Yet, just about any article you will read about this subject will advise you to wait... at least for the first trimester to pass.

Have you just found out that you are expecting a baby? The chances are that you are going through an emotional and physical roller coaster, that requires all of your strength! Any pregnancy is life changing, and I bet you can t wait to share the news with family and friends. Yet, just about any article you will read about this subject will advise you to wait... at least for the first trimester to pass.

If you have been trying to conceive for a while, I don t doubt that you have already read up on this subject. Perhaps you have seen useful how-to pieces that go into great detail about excuses you could possibly make if you have a party to attend during early pregnancy, and you need to justify why you are not drinking any alcohol.

Personally, I have always laughed them. Why do you need any excuse for not drinking in the first place? Isn t that ridiculous? That aside though, people who argue that you should wait for eight weeks, or ten, or twelve, to pass before telling those around you your happy news, do so because of the risk of miscarriage. If you do experience a miscarriage, something that is not uncommon, especially in first pregnancies, you might not want to have to tell everyone about it.

You won t want to deal with questions about how your pregnancy is progressing if you have just suffered a loss. This argument is valid enough, for some people. When deciding whether to tell your friends and family about your pregnancy right away or to wait for a while, think about how you would feel if you did suffer a miscarriage. Are you the type of person who grieves in private, and does not do well with outside interference? Then, waiting is certainly a good idea.

Are you someone who needs shoulders to cry on, and company to work through your grief? Then you would be telling people about your miscarriage even if they did not know you were pregnant in the first place! For women who belong to this category, I see no reason not to tell everyone who wants to hear it they are pregnant. There are other reasons for not sharing news about your pregnancy immediately, too.

Some couples prefer to enjoy the fact that they have created new life in private, and reflect on it for a while, before telling the rest of the world. Others simply need to get used to the idea that they are expecting a baby before they want others to know about it. If you do decide to delay telling others about your pregnancy, the question is for how long?

The risk of miscarriage is reduced with every passing week, and you might be experiencing pregnancy sickness or you might even start showing during the first trimester. The simply answer is that you should tell people about your pregnancy when you feel you want to, or, perhaps, when it is so obvious they would guess by themselves any way. Those who advocate waiting until you spread the good news tend to agree that, after you enter the second trimester, it is time to start telling your family and friends.