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Hi everyone.

 My neighbor has a Lab and he has recently been diagnosed with Addison’s disease.

Sarah took that pretty hard since she knows how it’s like to have that disease, she already had a dog that had the same disease. What a coincidence. She adopted both of them when they were puppies.

Anyway, she says everything will be fine, but to me it seems like she is very sad and not at all optimistic. I want to say to her that everything will be fine but I don’t want to lie to her. 

How successful is the therapy for this disease in dogs?

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Hello there. I am so sorry to hear this. Poor little thing :( I am always really sad when I hear this thing. But, you should tell her that with appropriate treatment for Adison’s disease, her dog can live very long and happy life. Therapy can be really successful, and there are two stages of treatment – in hospital treatment and long term treatment. Well, very sick dogs require intravenous fluid, cortisol and some drugs that can help neutralize the effects of potassium on the heart. I really hope that everything will be just fine, because her dog can recover from this. 

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I must say, that is a very strange coincidence. It would be a good idea that she tells their vet that both of her dog got Addison’s, if he/she already doesn’t know that.

As for Addison’s disease, it is uncommon illness in both humans and dogs, but Cushing’s disease, which is antipode to Addison’s, is much more common.

Just like for human medicine, modern times bring discovering of many new medicines that successfully control Addison’s disease in animals. With proper use of medications and if you can provide low-stress surrounding for your dog, he/she can live a very long life, despite the illness. 

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Since now I have a dog as well, I am reading a lot about it. Vets think a lot and talk a lot about Addison’s disease. There must be a reason because of this, right? It is dangerous, according to this what I was reading. Once that happens, the treatment and the diagnosis of your pet is something that you should control all the time. Somebody is saying that this is second, maybe the last chance for your dog, but this disease is more common in female dogs. If you discover this disease on time, therapy can be successful. Good luck and I hope that this is not the reason why your dog is nervous.

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Hello everyone.

To be realistic, Addison’s disease is a very serious health issue and MUST be treated properly. It doesn't matter how strong someone’s dog is, immune system can’t defeat this disease without professional help.

This health condition, also called hypoadrenocorticism is very rare and commonly attacks middle aged female dogs. I assume both of your friend’s dogs are female, right?

When it comes to efficiency of medical treatment, it's very complex and it combines hospitalization and intravenous therapy. Medications typically used in treating this disease are called mineralocorticoids. Florinef and Percortin are mostly used.

At the end, with regular rechecks and right medical treatment dogs with Addison’s disease tend to live pretty normal life.

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Do you even know what is Addison’s disease and what this can do to your dog? Guys, wake up, it is not some simple rash that can be cured tomorrow, if you know what I am saying. It makes me mad because my friend Alexandra lost her dog because she was thinking that Addison’s disease is something that will wait her to take her dog to the vet. She was telling me how her dog is strong, healthy, he was never sick, and the worst thing happened.

If you see some symptoms of this disease, take your dog to the vet immediately. It is serious.  

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Hello all. My best friend has an Irish setter . He is now four years old. Two years ago he was very sick. He was lethargic, his stool wasn’t ok, he felt sick. So she took him to the vet and he asked her to run some tests. 

 At the beginning, they had no clue what was wrong with him. After the results came, it was clear that it was Addison‘s disease.

The vet immediately started with therapy . He gave him some pills that contained corticosteroids, or to be more exact Prednisone.

Not long after that, dog started gaining weight. He felt better. He regained his energy. Now he is ok.

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