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Another view is that what's happened in our past isn't our fault but it's still down to us to deal with it.
If you come from a place where you had opportunity, great. But if you didn't, why should you be held down by that for the rest of your life? If the Michigan decision and Clarence Thomas's opinion on it were really meaningful, it would address the shameful disparity that's been going on in education since Brown v. Board of Education more than 50 years ago. Disparity occurs well before anyone thinks of going to law school. To address the problem means starting a lot earlier to right inequity. Do that, and you'll eliminate the need for special quota systems later.
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You are right, what happened in the past isn't our fault and it is our responsibility to deal with it. The most important word there is responsibility. Everyone should take responsibility for themselves. Be the best you can be and make the best of the situation you have. I do not come from teh Ghetto, but I do not come from Beverly Hills, either. So, why should I be passed over for a job or a spot in a school simply for being white, if I had the better score on the entrance test or the better resume, or interview... just to fill a quota? That hardly seems fair or just. It doesn't seem like the solution that anyone would have wanted, either. I really cannot speak for the Civil Rights leaders of old, but I would imagine that they jsut wanted an even playing field, not a superior one.
I agree, in theory with what you say, why be held down by where you come from for the rest of your life? I jsut don't hink you hve to be held down. You may have a rougher road than other people. And that really sucks. It does. No one's life is perfect. It's just not. you can try to overcome your adversity, or you can succomb to it and blame others and use it as an excuse and rely on the system to get you where you feel you deserve to be. I have a ton of respect for the people who overcome adversity and choose to work to get to a better place. They usually end up a lot better off than i do, i can tell you that. They just want it more.
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I do not come from teh Ghetto, but I do not come from Beverly Hills, either. So, why should I be passed over for a job or a spot in a school simply for being white...

Simply being white has afforded you many unfair advantages in this society (unless you think racism no longer exists).

You may have a rougher road than other people. And that really sucks. It does. No one's life is perfect. It's just not. you can try to overcome your adversity, or you can succomb to it and blame others and use it as an excuse and rely on the system to get you where you feel you deserve to be. I have a ton of respect for the people who overcome adversity and choose to work to get to a better place. They usually end up a lot better off than i do, i can tell you that. They just want it more.

Many minorities and immigrants have to work 10 times as hard to get half as far in life simply because of the colour of their skin or where they were born. Do we not have enough compassion to sacrifice some of our advantages in order that others may have a slightly better chance?
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I'm with you on a lot of what you say. I just don't think it happens with alarming frequency that white people get turned down for jobs when there are black people applying, too. I think black people still aren't getting hired, but now the (usually white) people doing the hiring have to work a little harder to say why they're not as qualified as the white person.

Look at the boards (and golf clubs and any other kind of good ol' boy network you can think of) and see how many black people there are, how many Arabs, how many white women, how many black women. Minorities are still fighting hard to get where the white men are. (Remember that up until 1964, that sort of discrimination was perfectly legal.) So if a white person doesn't get the job she wanted, how is that any different (or worse) than what's been going on in minority lives forever?

It's so much rarer that I think it's of almost no consequence, hence my initial use of the term "irrelevant." This is similar to the welfare queen whose name no one actually knows, or the people who spit on the soldiers coming home from Vietnam. The story has taken on mythic proportion, relative to the actual event.
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Thank you TOsteve. Very nicely put.
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I don't know how I feel on this, I can see both sides and find it hard to throw stones as a middle class white kid. Initially I was very opposed to Affirmative Action. My white cousin was denied admissions to UT Law the year of Hopwood v. UT despite being an excellent candidate.

However, I saw a Primetime Live on the products of Affirmative Action and the differences made in the lives of those affected, it was pretty amazing to me the socioeconomic impact it made for those people, their children, grandkids, careers, etc....
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Unfair advantages? :LOL: You crack me up Steve.
Haven't you heard the news -- The white male is an endangered species in corporate America these days.
Sorry, I don't think I should have to apologize for the color of my skin. Neither should anyone else.
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You can't possibly believe this...
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You can't possibly believe this...
:1: Just so you know, Sonny lives in a world where racism and sexism have been abolished.
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And that world in located in Georgia of all places 8O
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I hope this is still on topic (unlike the past few posts! ) but I just happened to be listening to a radio show last night about interracial marriages. I found it interesting that they claim we all are racist. Maybe we say we aren't racist against Koreans because we have a Korean friend but that friend might be the exception to you liking the rest of the Korean race.

They played this little ditty during their commercials that made me really stop and think. The song said something along the lines of "if you are going to live in this country speak my language!" Now, I don't typically consider myself racist at all but I have most definitely made that comment before. So, does that make me a racist? As G3's puts it - racism is "prejudice plus power" and that puts a whole different spin on it for me. In that regard I don't believe I am a racist.

Comments?
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I don't know what i am, but i do know that I'm not perfect. It does bother me that we have becoem bilingual. i won't lie. It costs money to produce everything in tow languages.
I seriously doube I've had any advantages because I'm white. I might be at a disadvantage in business because I'm a woman of childbearing age, but there are benefits to that too, so oh, well.
I honestly believe that there is no place for Affirmative Action, I just don't.
Good job getting it back On Topic, Diva!
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First of all, hardwork never killed anyone. It just makes you stronger and smarter.

And by someone giving up an advantage just so I can have one doesn't make me feel better or happier. I feel like it's a handout. I want to earn it. I want to compete. So, life isn't fair. I learned that long ago. Being a hispanic woman will always put you at a disadvantage.

Life is about finding what you're good at, what your strengths are, having faith that God has you where he wants you and going from there.

Don't take what someone else has rightfully earned and hand it to me because you think I can't get it any other way. Maybe it wasn't meant to be mine. If they have worked hard for it, they have earned it, too. And they deserve to keep it.
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Well said.
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:LOL:
easy on the sarcasm people.
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