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I have a 10 year old dog who is still very active. He often play in the park or in the woods together, and he also has some "dog friends" which he plays with sometimes. They are rough games, and the other day after a trip with my friend's dog I noticed my dog got a lump on his hind leg. What can this be? I thought one of the other dogs might have bitten him, but now it is still there and I am not so sure any more.

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Hello! Well I don't want to scare you but let's start from the worst possible. A tumor is any lump or bump, including an abscess, a wart, a hematoma, or a benign or malignant growth. A neoplasm is a tumor that grows as opposed to one that swells; a benign neoplasm is non-cancerous, and a malignant neoplasm is cancer. Cancers can be divided into three general groups: carcinomas that arise from epithelial cells that cover the body (skin) or line internal body surfaces; sarcomas that begin in connective, skeletal, muscular, or reproductive tissues; lymphomas that invade the lymph nodes and the lymphatic system. Dogs can also get papillomas, which can look like skin tag or a piece of chewing gum stuck on the skin. They are non-malignant, but if they become irritated or start to bleed, they should be removed. Annual checkups that include abdominal palpation, a thorough hands-on exam, and a look in the dog’s mouth are essential for early detection of many tumors, but owners must also check their dogs for any new or changed lumps or bumps and for emergence of the symptoms such as: Abnormal swellings that continue to grow, especially in the nymph nodes, sores do not heal, bleeding or discharge from the mouth, nose, urinary tract, rectum, or vagina, offensive odor, difficulty eating or swallowing, difficulty breathing, difficulting urinating or defecating, hesitation to exercise or loss of energy, loss of appetite, weight loss, persistent lameness or stiffness of movement, lumps in the breast area, abnormality or difference in size of testicles. Obviously, many of these symptoms are common in other diseases as well. I hope you haven't noticed symptoms such as these. An appointment at the veterinary clinic is necessary to determine whether they are signs of cancer. I hope this will help you.
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