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I redently had a bladder infection and was prescribed a course of antibiotics that lasted roughly a week. I'm also on the contraceptive pill. That is all fine now but I believed I was left with a yeast infection.

I noticed some itching and discomfort. Very very slight discharge but lots of itching from the opening of my vagina to up above my anus.

After a few days of dealing with it and hoping it would go away I had a look and noticed that the skin on my labia right up and in about a 5cm radius of my anus was red, looked raw (but is not painful or actually raw skin) and had soft flaky white skin all around the edges with a small almost pimply rash around the edges!

I tried to make a Dr's appointment to be told I can't get in until next week. I went to the chemist and was given a dose of Diflucan and some topical antifungal cream. That was 3 days ago.

The cream seems to help the itching, which has subsided somewhat. I have no pain or discomfort when I urinate. The skin is not sore. The white peeling areas have diminished and the pimply rash also seems to have gone down a bit. But I still have extreme redness and the area from my labia to around my anus is VERY red and looks as though I have been burnt!!! It has quite a definite edge where it's still peeling slightly. It just looks awful.

I still have DAYS to wait until I can see a Dr... does this really sound like a candida/thrush problem?

I'm very concerned about the peeling and have never seen anything like this before!

Any info/advice as to what this may be and how I can treat it would be most appreciated!!! I'm very worried and getting a Dr here is so hard!

I finished my course of antibiotics 4 days ago.

Also... depending on what this is... will I be safe to have sex at any point within the next few days or week?

Thank you!

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I am going through the exact same thing! Was taking an antibiotic for a bacterial infection. I didn't know if it came from the meds or from the brand of sanitary pads I was using (due to the area of the rash) it is in the crevice of my thigh and vagina and in my buttox. I Called the doctor and she told me to quit using Desitin to heel it and take Benadryl every 6 hours for 24 hours. Which was tough because I am in school and I work so I had to take off. It worked as far as controlling the soreness and serverity, but I still have the peeling and dryness. I am not using 100% Vaseline and it seems to be helping me out a lot more. The doctor also told me to try sitz baths and instead of drying with a towel use a blow dryer (Not too close to the area) I have a cool setting on mine that I use to keep from burning the area. I know this is very frustrating to take an anitbiotic for one thing and get another thing just as irritating. Good Luck with your treatment.
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Wow, I have the same symptoms as you both describe, and I have been off of antibiotics for two days for a bacterial toe infection and now I have rawness above my clitoris on the start of my lips. Skin is flaking off and it burns. So, benadryl? Does it help?
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I am so glad to have read what you have written I was beginning to panic that it was something much worse! I have just finished a course of antibiotics for a urinary tract infection (2 days ago) and now have red what looks like a rash between my vagina and anus and thought it may have been the sanitary towels I had been using but the skin surrounding my vagina is red itchy and flaking off! I can't get a doctors appoinment either so was wondering what you have found most effective to treat it? Benadryl? Anti-fungal cream? I have just started using canesten but to no relief yet! Ladies Help!!!
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I have the same thing, Ive been pretty run down lately and on top of it caught a cold. I think its probably a reaction to a yeast infection. The skin just cant cope. How to fix it? well im off to the doctor in a couple of days so ill let u know what he says, Acidophilus does somewhat help symptoms but it hasnt cured it for me.
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So I was in a car accident and began taking this medicine for my foot, commonly what happens is that these antibiotics we take kill all the good bacteria, my doctor told me to stop taking it and get some philodophlis (I think that's how it's spelled) it keeps and produces the good bacteria we need! I was going through the exact same thing as you guys, tought it was from bf, then too frequently using my sanitary wipes, but who knew! don't worry ladies, just get some of that acidopholis the even have yogurt the cool name for it is PB 8
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I have the same problem , have been to the dr. I was told it was a yeast infection and the medication ddid not work that I was prescribed!!! I tried a whole foods coop yeast cleanout kit, I tried desitin, a&d salve, aloe, apple cider vinegar, and anti itch cortison cream... am at my wits end and ... someone please help us...still itching and raw] you can email me at vixen_068yahoo.com
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I've been going through these same symptoms now for about 8 months! I've been back to my gyno at least 1/2 a dozen times before I got a second opinion. Even THAT gyno couldn't help me! I started out with a yeast infection, then I had an allergic reaction to the yeast infection medicine. The rash and the infection went away, but I've been left with extremely dry itchy red and flaking skin. I've been tested for PH imbalances, I've had an acid test, I've had a biopsy...nothing. I've finally been referred to a dermatologist because the last gyno seems to believe that my skin has just been too traumatized from the infection and the allergic reaction to recover on its own. My luck they'll put me on steroids that will cause another yeast infection...it's been a vicious circle thus far. I'm seeing the dermatologist tomorrow...i'll let you know what she says.
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Okay I had these exact same symptoms after recently being treated for a bacterial infection. Anyways I thought it wasn't going away and I probably was mis. diagnosed after reading this site I realised I probably have a blatter infection and before when I had one a nurse told me "she wasn't supposed to tell me but, get a spoon of baking soda add it too a 8 oz glass of water and drink it" I drank it last night after remembering and my symptoms are a lot better Already. also, stop using creams and other stuff if you have to clean extra during the day just use cold water and dab dry....try it after all nothing else is working......
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Hi folks,
In case anyone checks back here, you may have a condition called Lichen Sclerosis. Do Not, and I repeat, DO NOT go looking into this on the internet. You will scare yourself silly. This condition can absolutely be controlled and helped, but alot of info online is worse case and scary as hell. Just call your gyn and ask to be seen and say that you think it could possibly be lichen sclerosis.

The absolute best place to get info about LS, is at the following:
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/LichenSclerosis/

Just go to the files section - DO NOT LOOK AT THE PICTURES unless you are really bad. Those are worse case senerio and you will get better before you end up like that - even those people get better.
Hopefully, it's not LS, but better to know than to keep suffering.
H
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Listen up, i have a suspision were all allergic to the antibiotics we've been taking. I dont think it is LS but we should all go back to out GP asap.

I'm going on monday, I'll tell you what she says afterwards.
I hope we all get better soon.
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I honestly think most of you have a yeast infection, not an allergic reaction to the antibiotics. Allergic reactions would have been either trouble breathing and anaphylaxis, or hives, or maybe vomiting. Yeast infection is much more likely considering the reasons someone else has posted above.

I've had ongoing problems with yeast infections for years and I have found that Canasten does NOT work (My yeasts are resistant), Nilstat (nystatin) works sometimes, but other times I've had to use tea tree oil/lotion or garlic, or direct application of acidophilus/non sweetened yoghurt.

While you've got a yeast infection you should avoid sugary foods and drinks. It can take WEEKS to get rid of a yeast infection. Don't panic if it doesn't go away straight away.
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This sounds like....

Lichen Sclerosus
Publication Date: June 2004

Questions and Answers About Lichen Sclerosus
This booklet contains general information about lichen sclerosus. It describes what lichen sclerosus is and how it is diagnosed and treated. If you have further questions after reading this booklet, you may wish to discuss them with your doctor.

What Is Lichen Sclerosus?
Lichen sclerosus (LIKE-in skler-O-sus) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that can affect men, women, or children, but is most common in women. It usually affects the vulva (the outer genitalia or sex organ) and the anal area. While lichen sclerosus appears predominantly in postmenopausal women, this skin condition is also known to develop on the head of the penis in men. Occasionally, lichen sclerosus is seen on other parts of the body, especially the upper body, breasts, and upper arms.

The symptoms are the same in children and adults. Early in the disease, small, subtle white spots appear. These areas are usually slightly shiny and smooth. As time goes on, the spots develop into bigger patches, and the skin surface becomes thinned and crinkled. As a result, the skin tears easily, and bright red or purple discoloration from bleeding inside the skin is common. More severe cases of lichen sclerosus produce scarring that may cause the inner lips of the vulva to shrink and disappear, the clitoris to become covered with scar tissue, and the opening of the vagina to narrow.

Lichen sclerosus of the penis occurs almost exclusively in uncircumcised men (those who have not had the foreskin removed). Affected foreskin can scar, tighten, and shrink over the head of the penis. Skin on other areas of the body affected by lichen sclerosus usually does not develop scarring.

How Common Is It?
Although definitive data are not available, lichen sclerosus is considered a rare disorder that can develop in people of all ages. It usually appears in postmenopausal women and primarily affects the vulva. It is uncommon for women who have vulvar lichen sclerosus to have the disease on other skin surfaces. The disease is much less common in childhood. In boys, it is a major cause of tightening of the foreskin, which requires circumcision. Otherwise, it is very uncommon in men.

What Are the Symptoms?
Symptoms vary depending on the area affected. Patients experience different degrees of discomfort. When lichen sclerosus occurs on parts of the body other than the genital area, most often there are no symptoms, other than itching. If the disease is severe, bleeding, tearing, and blistering caused by rubbing or bumping the skin can cause pain.

Very mild lichen sclerosus of the genital area often causes no symptoms at all. If the disease worsens, itching is the most common symptom. Rarely, lichen sclerosus of the vulva may cause extreme itching that interferes with sleep and daily activities. Rubbing or scratching to relieve the itching can create painful sores and bruising, so that many women must avoid sexual intercourse, tight clothing, tampons, riding bicycles, and other common activities that involve pressure or friction. Urination can be accompanied by burning or pain, and bleeding can occur, especially during intercourse. When lichen sclerosus develops around the anus, the discomfort can lead to constipation that is difficult to relieve. This is particularly common in children. It is important to note that the signs of lichen sclerosus in children may sometimes be confused with those of sexual abuse.

Most men with genital lichen sclerosus have not been circumcised. They sometimes experience difficulty pulling back the foreskin and have decreased sensation at the tip of the penis. Occasionally, erections are painful, and the urethra (the tube through which urine flows) can become narrow or obstructed.

What Causes Lichen Sclerosus?
The cause is unknown, although an overactive immune system may play a role. Some people may have a genetic tendency toward the disease, and studies suggest that abnormal hormone levels may also play a role. Lichen sclerosus has also been shown to appear at sites of previous injury or trauma where the skin has already experienced scarring or damage.

Is It Contagious?
No, lichen sclerosus is not contagious.

How Is It Diagnosed?
Doctors can diagnose an advanced case by looking at the skin. However, early or mild disease often requires a biopsy (removal and examination of a small sample of affected skin). Because other diseases of the genitalia can look like lichen sclerosus, a biopsy is advised whenever the appearance of the skin is not typical of lichen sclerosus.

How Is It Treated?
Patients with lichen sclerosus of nongenital skin often do not need treatment because the symptoms are very mild and usually go away over time. The amount of time involved varies from patient to patient.

However, lichen sclerosus of the genital skin should be treated, even when it is not causing itching or pain, because it can lead to scarring that may narrow openings in the genital area and interfere with either urination or sexual intercourse or both. There is also a very small chance that skin cancer may develop within the affected areas.

In uncircumcised men, circumcision is the most widely used therapy for lichen sclerosus. This procedure removes the affected skin, and the disease usually does not recur.

Prescription medications are required to treat vulvar lichen sclerosus, nongenital lichen sclerosus that is causing symptoms, and lichen sclerosus of the penis that is not cured by circumcision. The treatment of choice is an ultrapotent topical corticosteroid (a very strong cortisone cream or ointment). These creams or ointments may be applied daily for several weeks, which will be sufficient to stop the itching. However, long-term but less frequent applications (sometimes as infrequently as twice a week) will be needed to keep the lesions from reactivating and to help restore the skin's normal texture and strength. Treatment does not reverse the scarring that may have already occurred.

Because prolonged use of ultrapotent corticosteroid creams and ointments can cause thinning and redness of the skin, give rise to "stretch marks" around the area of application, and predispose individuals to vulvar yeast infections, periodic followup by a doctor is necessary.

Young girls may not require lifelong treatment, since lichen sclerosus can sometimes, but not always, disappear permanently at puberty. Scarring and changes in skin color, however, may remain even after the symptoms have disappeared.

Ultrapotent topical corticosteroids are so effective that other therapies are rarely prescribed. The previous standard therapy was testosterone cream or ointment, but this has been proven to produce no more benefit than a placebo (inactive) cream. Prolonged use of the testosterone cream or ointment can cause masculinization (low-pitched voice, increased coarse facial hairs). Another hormone cream, progesterone, was previously used to treat the disease, but has also been shown to be ineffective. Retinoids, or vitamin A-like medications, may be helpful for patients who cannot tolerate or are not helped by ultrapotent topical corticosteroids.

Tacrolimus (Protopic*) ointment has been reported to benefit some patients, but more research is needed to confirm this. Tacrolimus is a steroid-free ointment; it is not a corticosteroid. Tacrolimus has no apparent side effects other than local irritation in some patients.

* Brand names included in this booklet are provided as examples only, and their inclusion does not mean that these products are endorsed by the National Institutes of Health or any other Government agency. Also, if a particular brand name is not mentioned, this does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory.

There are some early indications that different forms of ultraviolet light treatments, with or without psoralens (pills that intensify the effect of ultraviolet A light), may be effective and well-tolerated treatments for some patients with lichen sclerosus on nongenital skin.

Patients who need medication should ask their doctor how the medication works, what its side effects might be, and why it is the best treatment for their lichen sclerosus.

For women and girls, surgery to remove the affected skin is not an acceptable option because lichen sclerosus comes back after removal. Surgery may be useful for scarring, but only after lichen sclerosus is controlled with medication.

Sometimes, people do not respond to the ultrapotent topical corticosteroid. Other factors, such as low estrogen levels, an infection, irritation, or allergy to the medication, can keep symptoms from clearing up. Your doctor may need to treat these as well. If you feel that you are not improving as you would expect, talk to your doctor.

Can People With Lichen Sclerosus Have Sexual Intercourse?
Women with severe lichen sclerosus may not be able to have sexual intercourse because of pain or scarring that narrows the entrance to the vagina. However, proper treatment with an ultrapotent topical corticosteroid can help restore normal sexual functioning, unless severe scarring has already narrowed the vaginal opening. In this case, surgery may be needed to correct the problem, but only after the disease has been controlled.

Is Lichen Sclerosus Related to Cancer?
Lichen sclerosus does not cause skin cancer. However, skin that is scarred by lichen sclerosus is more likely to develop skin cancer. The frequency of skin cancer in men with lichen sclerosus is not known. It is important for people who have the disease to receive proper treatment and to see the doctor every 6 to 12 months, so that the doctor can monitor and treat any changes that might signal skin cancer.

What Kind of Doctor Treats Lichen Sclerosus?
Lichen sclerosus is treated by dermatologists (doctors who treat the skin) and by gynecologists if the female genitalia are involved. Urologists (a specialist of the urinary or urogenital tract) and primary health care providers with a special interest in genital diseases also treat this disease. To find a doctor who treats lichen sclerosus, ask your family doctor for a referral, call a local or State department of health, look in the local telephone directory, or contact a local medical center. The American Academy of Dermatology also provides referrals to dermatologists in your area, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists can refer you to a gynecologist. The Directory of Medical Specialists, available at most public libraries, lists dermatologists, gynecologists, and urologists in your area.
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ok i am having the same problem. ive never had sex but my boyfriend did finger me for the first time a few weeks ago. i had an upper respiratory infection and so the dr gave me two really strong pills and they made me really sick and so i got a new prescription. shortly after that i noticed that my vagina was extremely itchy. i assumed it was a yeast infection due the the medicine so i started taking monistat i was on it for a week in a half before i started my period. i stopped taking the monistat because i felt i was better but a few days of wearing a pad i noticed from my clitoris to my anus was red on the outside with white peeling flaky skin all around it. i started freaking out i have a cold and have been on benedryl and claritin and zicam for 5 days now.....i cant go to the dr for another 2 months, please help!!! im FREAKING out
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Guest wrote:

you guys all need to get a herpes test. almost 1 out of every two people have it and dont know it. and you all have symtoms for it.l




Although it's always smart to get tested, your numbers are ridiculously off, although STDs and STIs are common 50% of the population does not have herpes. Genital warts is the most common and it's said it's 1 in every 4 people 19-45 and personally I even think that's exagerating.

Don't try to scare all these girls
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