Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

I too was frightened to death about my total colectomy before I had it. I had lived with horrible constipation all of my life. It was to the point where I became septic after 21 days without a BM. I took the "plunge" (no pun intended), in December of 2007 and boy am I glad that I did. I do NOT go 11 times a day. In fact I go about 2-3 depending on what I eat. The good outweighs the illness that you are living with in my opinion. My life is so much better since the surgery! I say go for it. The only thing I can think of that is negative is that I have gained 40 pounds since the surgery. I don't know if it is because I eat and feel good when I eat now or if it has something to do with absorbtion. All and all though I would do it again in a "New York Minute". :D
Reply

Loading...

Never in my wildest dreams did I ever think I would be on this kind of forum. But I am, and am very scared and have a lot of questions, but will only ask a couple for now. They may sound stupid, but these are things that i'm worried about. 2 years ago I had a small bowel resect, my small bowell had strictures and ended up collapsing. This is because the first hospital I went to with labor type pains, couldn't diagnose me for a month, so I finally went to a very well known hospital, who also took a while to find the diagnosis. I had to swallow a capsule endoscopy which takes tons or photos, Needless to say, it got stuck in the area that collapsed. A year later, I had to go back to have adhesions removed where the resect was done.

Now here i am 2 years later, and i can't go to the bathrrom without drinking magnesium citrate, which there were 2 times that didn't work too well. So my Dr. sent me for a sitz marker test, and 5 days later got x-rayed and told that my colon has shut down and a total colectomy is recommended. I've read these posts and how they say you have about 6 to 7 bowel movements a day. Do you get a warning, before you have to go? Can something go wrong years after which would call for a colostomy? and I know this is a stupid question, but since you have to have frequent bm's, can it effect your sex life? I'm 41, and wasn't prepared for this and i don't know what the best thing to do is.

Sorry this is so long, hope to hear from somebody here. Thank you.
Reply

Loading...

I had a total colectomy in 1996, at the age of 25. I now have about 6 bowel movements a day. You do have the sensation that you need to go, it is just different in that you can't hold it as long as before the surgery. It's not like you have to rush to the bathroom right then, but I usually try to make it more quickly than before.
It has not affected my sex life, and I can honestly say I've never had the urge to go during sex. Not sure of the reason for this, but I'm glad it's not an issue. It is frustrating having more bowel movements a day, but in my case it was better than the alternative of colon cancer from Ulcerative Colitis. The number of bowel movements you have is also dependent on what you eat, and how much you eat. I also now currently take lots of imodium and fiber. The fiber really helps to "bulk things up"
Hope this helps!
Jennifer
Reply

Loading...

I'm 28 and had a total coletomy due to UC 10 years ago this month, I have a straight ileo anal pull through so no j or s pouch, intestines attached right to my rectum. I've had a lot of problems with this surgery, I would say on a good day I have 10 bowel movements a day but quit frankly I've gotten use to it and not to much a bother unless I'm traveling or not close to a bathroom. As far as food goes I ate whatever I wanted, besides hot stuff for the first couple of years...like one of the post above it travels through the system much more quickly and holy cow is it painful to pass hot food, over the years I began to develop a lot of scar tissue and one by one lost the foods I love most, fruits and veggies due to them becoming stuck for hours...an obstruction, OUCH! I had another surgery 2 months ago for what was thought to be ovarian cyst (I also have endometriosis), it looked exactly like cyst's in the ultrasound but it turned out to be crazy scar tissue everywhere, he didn't feel he was capable of removing it from my ovaries, tubes and uterus but removed it from my small intestines and man was there a lot, he said he thought I would feel 100% better but has proved to be quit the opposite, I've lost 13 lbs which doesn't seem to bad only I was skinny to begin with 123 to 113, my stomach hurts every time I eat and I've been going to the bathroom none stop...I sure hope it passes, I guess it will just take some time for my intestines to get use to their new position, at least that's what I hope :-( I've become quit depressed with all these new porblems, further compounding that is I probably can't have a baby due to the scaring of my female organs. With all that being said I am greatful for my surgery because even as bad as it's been it didn't hold a candle to UC, I had a very bad case which couldn't be keep undercontrol, I only had UC for a little over a year and it had to come out. I hope everyone gets the answers they need and I hope we all live long wonderful, full lives despite our problems.
Reply

Loading...

Hi. I had my colon removed 9 years ago by an excellent doctor in Nashville and the quality of my life has increased dramatically. He removed my colon and attached my small intestine to my rectum. My colon had loops and so my whole life I had problems. I would go weeks between bowel movements. I was told to eat fiber and exercise more etc.... til I finally found a colo-rectal specialist who helped me. The initial weeks after the surgery--months actually--were challenging. I did lose 20+ pounds initially, but after 6 months to a year, I was quite regulated and to my new "normal". My doctor gave me a list of foods and how my body would process them, and it has proven to be really accurate. I have had less sickness--like colds and bronchitis which I used to get regularly. My bowels are very regular now. my stomach is not bloated and distended now. I feel like a new person. I used to say "so this is what normal people feel like!"
Do your homework on what doctors do this procedure regularly, and talk with their prior patients to hear their outcomes. I only wish I had met this doctor in my 20s. I had my surgery at 40 years old. I have no real problems with foods(though beef is not good and eggs are out of the question.) Salads are good, chicken, fish. fruit, veggies, breads, cereals, pasta.....
Reply

Loading...


My sister has a total colectomy with ileostomy & fiber is more or less discouraged because of the lack of having a colon.
Reply

Loading...

I suffered for about 8 years with sever colon issues IBS and diverticulitis. I had a tear in my colon in 2004 that almost cost me my life before I realized what was wrong and was treated. I had a partial colectomy at that time. My bowls were full of diverticulum. I was sick and in the hospital approximately twice a year being admitted for a typical stay of 5 days being treated with antibiotics. I tried various approaches to eating differently which usually resulted to me being hospitalized with a flare up of infection. I had sever infection in 01/09 and my doctor said that it was time to make a more drastic move to a total colectomy. I was terrified but being on the edge of 40 and tired of spending so much time in and out of hospitals I decided the risk outweighed the alternative risk of dying from my own slow septic poisoning. After recovering from the infection I scheduled my total colectomy. 02/09. It was the best decision I could have made. I immediately felt overall my health was greatly improved. My mind was clearer. My energy increased. I looked bright and felt better. Of course there were recovery challenges. I had a bout with adhesions which was very painful and scary. I suffered post surgery nausea and vomiting. When I came out of the procedure the pain was sever and I was thinking WTH did I just do to myself. July I flew from GA to CA for my daughters college graduation. I had a great time in CA even enjoyed a day in the gym with my daughter and her friends and kept up with their workout. I just wanted to share to let people know that in my case at least it is something I am very thankful that I had the option to utilize. Yes there are challenges but the results in my health and the fact that I can eat raw veggies w/o going to the hospital and I have energy again and can go to the gym and do things with my family has hugely outweighed the challenges I had before. :-) Best wishes to all suffering the likes and God speed in recovery.
Reply

Loading...

I know this is an older post, but just happened upon this. Unlikely that your drinking had anything to do with your bowel obstruction- I had a total back in 2004-the usual-7 days in hosp, home for about a week, then back in another week because of bowel obstruction. The majority of bowel obstructions are due to #1- the surgery itself-manipulation of the intestines often cause the remaining bowel to "lock-up" or obstruct. The #2 reason (no pun iontended!), is due to the narcotic pain medicine that we take for control of post-op pain-narcotic pain meds are notorious for causing the problem, though a necessary evil as we all know that post op pain can be a living hell! Don't beat yourself up- if you were up and about and trying to help yourself recover, there's nothing that you did to make this happen. Hope you've healed well and gotten on with it!
Reply

Loading...

Thankyou to everyone for sharing your information. My husband Rod had a total colectomy and small bowel resection with ileal loop 3 weeks ago (due to tumour and perforations). We will be now be aware that you can still have bowel obstructions - ? related to what you eat and or adhesions. I assumed that Rod would not ever put on much weight - as he is always hungry - but you have made me aware that might not be the case. Yes greasy foods do create some problems. He is on Loperamide Hydrocloride 2 mgs twice a day to thicken up the bowel motion - seems to work well. So far so good. I will keep an eye on this post. Thanks again

Avrielle from Australia
Reply

Loading...

Hi there, I'm new to this site. I am a 31 year old female and have had problems going to the restroom as long as I can remember. The last year and a half has become worse. I started paying more attention to my gi tract and wanted to help myself become more regular. So I started with the fiber, water, diet, exercise change and it only seemed to make things more heavy in my stomach. I tried miralax, stool softeners, laxatives, colonics,herbal teas, prescription meds and nothing is working to make me regular.it now, it actually has made things worse and more uncomfortable. After a year of struggling, it seems as though my gi does not respond well to any meds or supplements. When I take meds my bowel seems to just turn to mush and sit there or swim back and forth like a fish bowl, but no release. When I push on my right side its all mushy and swishy sounding and my stomach makes a lot of noise - like clogged drains. When I don't take meds, I get very bloated and feel full all the time, constipated. It usually takes 4-5 days or more and then ill have a release. Sometimes very lil, sometimes one big load. I feel sluggish and fatigued most days.
I have been in and out of the gi dept with plenty of tests. All blood tests come back normal, my heart rate is a lil above average but they say normal. I have had the sitz marker test and on day 3 they sit in my sigmoidcolon. I just did the camera capsule a wk and a half ago and waiting on results. My doc mentioned removing my colon/large intestines. I'm anxious for a resolution as my quality of life...honesty, *****. I am tired and just want to lay down. But really what I want is to feel normal and get out and enjoy the world.
Should I push for surgery? Larposcopic or open? Surgery is scary but living life the way I feel is even more scary to me. I feel I just want the surgery, recovery, and get back to my life.
Anyone have the same weird gi issues and/or results from doc? Please respond. Thanks.
Reply

Loading...

Hi guys. After reading about problems some of you have after colectomy I wanted to let anyone who is anticipating the op. know about the success I have had. It is 9 years since I had a laparoscopic total colectomy. The op. was a success and there have been no problems to speak of since. An autoimmune disease is the reason I needed the colectomy. I eat most things in small amounts - a healthy diet- and do not eat any fermentable fibre. Occasionally I have some pain if I have eaten too much at one time, but Movicol helps with that. I eat no red meat but am fine with chicken and fish. The main thing is not to eat very much at one time. Small meals frequently, being sure to eat enough protein - AND be sure to drink plenty of water. I have had some problem with adhesions but that may be due to my autoimmune problems. However, a small quick op. is all it takes to fix that. Be sure to seek out a colon surgeon of repute and all should be well. Remain positive and do whatever your doctor tells you. I have had success - I am 68 - and so can you.
Reply

Loading...

My husband just had 1/3 of his right colon removed. After having an attack this past Saturday, they did a colectomy Sunday morning. Today is day 3. He is 63 yrs old. He has cardio myopathy, diabetes and had just returned to work last Wednesday after being diagnosed with cardiac myopathy 6 months ago. He just worked 4 days then this happened. I will go to the hospital this am to be with him. We don't know what to expect after this. His colon had essentially died due to lack of blood supply. Doctor said it was like a heart attack of the colon. Doctor reattached his colon and a colostomy was avoided. I will be checking in this site to see if anyone can offer more positive hope and what to expect. Thank you GG
Reply

Loading...

It's 11 days post op. My husbands feeling very weak, and naps frequently. He seems to be in a daze sometimes. Is this the norm? Maybe realizing just how close he came to death, puts him into a shock. Septic shock was happening to him just before surgery. He is going poops several times a day now. Will this slow down? His surgeon was very pleased with his progress 2 days ago. Going to see his PCP this afternoon, and will voice my concerns. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you Gg
Reply

Loading...

Hi to all,
Thankyou to all who are sharing information. I first submitted to this site after my husband had a total colectomy with ileostomy in Feb 2010. All is well so far and he has had 4 out of 12 chemo sessions. We have learnt a few things over the months.
Dont miss a meal - causes liquid stools
Someone suggested marshmellows. They definately work to thicken the stool. he has about 4 a day
He has a good diet but still has a protein drink and a poweraid each day to supplement any lost electrolytes (as the small bowel doesnt absorb as well as the large colon)

I think our best breakthrough has been with his stoma. He had a period where the stoma was excoriated due to liquid stools. The stoma nurse put us onto EAKIN Cohesive SLIMS. Its a ring to apply to the base plate before application to the skin. Works fantastically. We have never had a problem since. Rod says he should get stoma of the year. (You have to joke about something).

Good luck to all having future surgery. I always think of it as "so far so good"

Regards
Avrielle from Australia
Reply

Loading...

I am 38 and three years post-op. I had a terrible time at first. My surgery was not laproscopic and I developed a severe infection requiring several months on a wound vac. This meant additional time with the iliostomy and a very slow recovery. After the surgery to reverse the illiostomy, my bowels completely shut down and I was unable to keep anything down resulting in a g-tube being inserted. I was in the hospital for 11 days rather than the expected 2-3 days. Since recovering from all of that life has improved but very slowly. I cannot eat anything I want. I avoid foods that are high in fiber like fresh fruits and vegetables and I still have trouble with popcorn nuts and seeds. I usually have a bm every time I use the bathroom and get up at least once a night to use the restroom. This is not a surgery to be taken lightly. If you have cancer or other life threatening disease it is the lesser of two evils. I battled UC for 12 years and was unresponsive to typical UC drugs. I wish I would have waited a few more years because the new UC drugs on the market are more effective, have fewer adverse side effects, and are less invasive than what I was offered. Good luck to any of you considering the surgery.
Reply

Loading...